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How much should I revise for A-level if I am aiming for straight A's? watch

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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Agreed. I tried to make the gradient tend towards zero, but its difficult on MS paint. whatever your intelligence too, a certain amount of work is needed. you can't just spontaneously gain knowledge.
    I also didn't specify what work was measured in. depends both on time spent, and how hard the person concentrates etc.
    It may need to be redrawn

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    yes, this afternoon is that boring for me
    Keep me updated, I need that report by 9.

    Onto other business, we're all obviously working toward the efficiency ratio, so if Johnson could take point on that?
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    A lot. I didn't do all that much throughout the year - mainly focussed on coursework/ homework. But for about 1 and a half months before exams I barely left my room because I felt strangely compulsed to spend every second of the day working!! (It was very abnormal behaviour, and hasn't been repeated since A2!) but it paid off and I got my 3 A's
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    Just do as much as you feel you need to. For example, I did sweet FA revision for my French exam (literally just reading over some quotes for the literature essay to memorise them an hour before the exam) and got an A*. I did a lot more work for Maths (did past papers solidly starting four days before the exam) and got an A. For me personally, starting any earlier would have been pointless. I knew in myself that I knew most of the material already, and that only a bit of reinforcing was needed to jump start the old memory (mine's terrible, honestly). I wouldn't say you really need to go over your notes as soon as you get them (or even make notes at all in my case) but just make sure you understand everything. If you don't understand something you won't succeed no matter how much you revise/memorise it or how good your exam technique is.

    Another tip for essay-based subjects: look out the specimen and January papers (or the ones from last June if it's a January paper), look at those questions and you can safely discount the info asked in those questions. Means there's less to revise as they won't ask the same questions that close together. Anything further than that is fair game, however. Using this method allowed me to predict several questions on my History of Art and Politics papers, meaning I had ready-made answers in my head. :awesome: You need to be smart about your revision, not just spend hours on everything. It doesn't work like that.
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    (Original post by adam271)
    I revise everything the teacher mentioned in class so I am sure I got everything in class. You could do this and when exams come start revising.

    How long you revise does not really matter it's what you take in.
    you can force yourself to revise for 5 hours a day and not take anything in. Yet someone else could revise for 1 hour a day and take in more then the guy who was revising for 5 hours.
    This
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    You should know how much you need to revise by the end of the year. Just "keep up" with it for about half the year. It varies wildly between people so taking advice here wont work. Personally i slept/played poker in lessons for 3/4 of the year then crammed it in for a few weeks beforehand. Obviously this is a ridiculous example to follow so don't. I wouldnt start too early or you'll burn out.
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    Depends how intelligent you are. You could be revising 3-5 hours a day but hardly taking anything in whereas someone else could be doing 2 hrs and taking alot in. Im a slow learner so takes me quite long.. that doesnt mean ive done load of revision its just that it takes me time. different for different people
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    i think cramming is the worst. if you are really aiming for those top grades i suggest you spend 4 hours a day revision. if you are doing maths like i am (AS) I would recommend going through every excerscise in the text book and also do past papers.
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    (Original post by emmaD96)
    Question in the title
    I'm doing CIE A Levels and the best strategy that I can come up with, is first of all revise the chapters from the book, thoroughly, then from the notes from your teacher, really get your concepts clear, then solve questions from past papers (without looking from the mark scheme) first try it, struggle with it, spend some time on it, and if all else fails, then refer to the mark scheme. Its not about the amount of time that you give to your studies, its about how well you know your work and how good your concepts are, so I would suggest that make a timetable for your subjects, arrange your subjects on how you want to study and apply on it, I think two hours (maybe an hour up or down) of 'concentated' studying for one chapter, including some past paper questions is fine. As said before, its not about quantity, its about quality. Good luck in getting those result, and also pray for my A Levels too. Thanks
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    Revise until you know everything and you'll get an A in a fact based subject.

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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Don't think about it in terms of 'revising', if you are starting your A levels now, think about it in terms of 'being on top of the subject from the word go'. If you are on top of the subject then you don't really need to revise, you have just learned and understood everything as you have gone along, yes you need to be regularly reading over stuff you did in the past to make sure it makes sense, but if you are on top of the material from the start then you will just be confident when it comes to exam time.

    Problem with a lot of peoples approach is they kind of halfheartedly go through the term and then draw up a 'revision timetable' which is basically a form of cramming where they have to teach themselves parts of the syllabus for the first time, when it comes to revision.

    University is like this as well, if you are somewhere where they don't examine at the end of every semester and it comes down to a load of exams in the summer, you can't possibly revise enough for those, you just have to make sure from week 1 of the course you are on top of the material so by the time it comes to exam you just know you will know what to do.
    really appreciated dat
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    i revise 23 hours a day and have a power nap for thirty minutes. this is really effective. the information in the textbook goes into my head by osmosis.
 
 
 
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