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'Irritating punctuation.' Not 'irritating punctuation'. watch

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    Greetings,

    After reading various posts on sites and such like, I'm increasingly finding what I believe is incorrect punctuation.

    At school, I was taught that quotation marks should be applied as follows:

    "Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year."

    Ok note how the quotation marks proceed the full stop.

    Ok does the same rule apply to apostrophes such as the following example:

    This type of attitude is 'childish.'

    Or should the full stop proceed the apostrophe:

    This type of attitude is 'childish'.

    I am getting frustrated because I see both variations used all the time. I just want to know which one is grammatical correct.

    Thanks.

    Also, this might seem tedious but when I was 15-16 I used to use big words such as Thus, Nevertheless, On the Other hand, but now I cringe when I see people use these, unless their syntax is appropriate for them.

    I don't know but I find that uses 'thus' and other discourse markers makes your writing look forced... Or doesn't fit the context. Like if someone was responding to a thread on the internet and use 'thus,' I get the feeling they're trying to be more intelligent than they actually are.

    Other words include Consequently, Moreover, Subsequently... Gah! I cringe when I see people using these on here, they make you sound like a 70 year old. They are completely out of context and degrade your writing style, unless they're used mimicking a 70 year old of course.

    However, 'however' isn't too bad as long as it's used in moderation, of course!
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    grammar nazi
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    The language people use when replying on here, will be influenced by the language they are accustomed to using in their general communications. I don't see the problem.
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    Standard UK usage is to put the full stop outside of the apostrophes. Putting it inside the apostrophes is standard US usage.
    Aha! So Oxford's Geography website didn't have punctuation errors on. http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/

    I was going to send off an email to them complaining and all!

    I would've looked like a total idiot. I didn't know that fact.
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    (Original post by Justin1265)
    Also, this might seem tedious but when I was 15-16 I used to use big words such as Thus, Nevertheless, On the Other hand, but now I cringe when I see people use these, unless their syntax is appropriate for them.

    I don't know but I find that uses 'thus' and other discourse markers makes your writing look forced... Or doesn't fit the context. Like if someone was responding to a thread on the internet and use 'thus,' I get the feeling they're trying to be more intelligent than they actually are.

    Other words include Consequently, Moreover, Subsequently... Gah! I cringe when I see people using these on here, they make you sound like a 70 year old. They are completely out of context and degrade your writing style, unless they're used mimicking a 70 year old of course.[/I]
    :lolwut: But these are just normal words... most people use them in everyday speech/writing. They just come naturally. If none of those words existed, what would you use instead?
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    Why is "On the Other hand" capitalised when it's in the middle of a sentence? Orthography fail
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    (Original post by Justin1265)
    Aha! So Oxford's Geography website didn't have punctuation errors on. http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/

    I was going to send off an email to them complaining and all!

    I would've looked like a total idiot. I didn't know that fact.
    It's also customary to use single quotation marks in the UK and double in the US. But neither is right or wrong.


    "Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year." <-- US
    'Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year'. <-- UK
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    (Original post by FormerlyHistoryStudent)
    :lolwut: But these are just normal words... most people use them in everyday speech/writing. They just come naturally. If none of those words existed, what would you use instead?
    Meh... I accept the words, but only if they are used appropriately when placed in the right context.
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    Who gives a 'flying ****.' or is that 'flying ****'. Who knows?
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    (Original post by Justin1265)

    "Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year."



    This type of attitude is 'childish'.

    i would guess that these two are correct because in the first case the quotation marks cover a whole sentence whereas in the second they only cover a single word.
    thats what seems logical to me
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    (Original post by Justin1265)

    "Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year."

    Ok note how the quotation marks proceed the full stop.

    Ok does the same rule apply to apostrophes such as the following example:

    This type of attitude is 'childish.'

    Or should the full stop proceed the apostrophe:

    This type of attitude is 'childish'.
    of course!
    I would say,

    "Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year."

    is correct as you're quoting a sentence therefore you put the sentence punctuation in the quote.

    However I think the following sentence is correct.

    This type of attitude is 'childish'.

    This is because you are quoting a word which requires no punctuation, therefore you don't need any inside the quotes.

    This may not be correct but it's what I would expect to see.
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    You mean PRECEDE, not PROCEED.
    The correct answer is 'childish'. Not 'childish.' But I can see how it could be tricky.
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    (Original post by Justin1265)
    Ok note how the quotation marks proceed the full stop.
    Do you mean "the quotation mark succeeds the full stop"?

    If so, then the irony of you using big words to sound more intelligent is not lost!
    :woo:
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    When the whole sentence is quoted, the the full stop remains within the quotation marks, however when only one word is quoted, it remains outside of the quotation marks.

    And bro, 'thus' isn't a big word.
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    (Original post by Justin1265)
    Greetings,

    After reading various posts on sites and such like, I'm increasingly finding what I believe is incorrect punctuation.

    At school, I was taught that quotation marks should be applied as follows:

    "Child mortality rates have increased by 23% in the past year."

    Ok note how the quotation marks proceed the full stop.

    Ok does the same rule apply to apostrophes such as the following example:

    This type of attitude is 'childish.'

    Or should the full stop proceed the apostrophe:

    This type of attitude is 'childish'.

    I am getting frustrated because I see both variations used all the time. I just want to know which one is grammatical correct.

    Thanks.

    Also, this might seem tedious but when I was 15-16 I used to use big words such as Thus, Nevertheless, On the Other hand, but now I cringe when I see people use these, unless their syntax is appropriate for them.

    I don't know but I find that uses 'thus' and other discourse markers makes your writing look forced... Or doesn't fit the context. Like if someone was responding to a thread on the internet and use 'thus,' I get the feeling they're trying to be more intelligent than they actually are.

    Other words include Consequently, Moreover, Subsequently... Gah! I cringe when I see people using these on here, they make you sound like a 70 year old. They are completely out of context and degrade your writing style, unless they're used mimicking a 70 year old of course.

    However, 'however' isn't too bad as long as it's used in moderation, of course!
    Anybody who starts off a post with 'Greetings' and then lectures other about sounding like a 70 year old needs to sit themself down in a corner and have a quiet word.
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    (Original post by failingatm)
    When the whole sentence is quoted, the the full stop remains within the quotation marks, however when only one word is quoted, it remains outside of the quotation marks.

    And bro, 'thus' isn't a big word.
    I hate 'Thus'.

    It sounds so forced and fake.

    Thus, thus is for kids who like to sound intelligent.

    The real professionals don't use Thus at the start of every paragraph or sentence as they're able to link their points more coherently.

    I think that anybody who uses any discourse marker when writing should use them sparingly. I hate this...

    'Next, discourse markers should be used sparingly. Therefore, allowing what you write to be more coherent. Thus, making it easier to understand and subsequently, making people want to read it'.

    That's just overkill but do you know how many retarded posts like that I've seen on here? Gah... It makes you look like a GCSE kid you think he sounds smart. In reality, you sound like a total moron and people will not take you seriously.

    You will be laughed at if you write like the above.

    Advice to 99% of people on here, please find a suitable syntax structure that isn't forced. Please.
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    "Hello, my name is kim." You are ending the sentence which is in quotation marks, so the full stop is inside to.

    What always confuses me is, if you put a quotation at the end of a paragraph "Is it written like this?".

    In magazines the seem to miss the full stop off after quotations. Are they just wrong?

    The childish one would be outside of the apostrophes because you're only putting apostrophes around the word, not the sentence.
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    > Used 'proceed' rather than 'precede'
    :ahee:


    ...............
    There's your ******* punctuations ^^
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    (Original post by Justin1265)
    Advice to 99% of people on here, please find a suitable syntax structure that isn't forced. Please.
    This.

    I see too many people trying to sound intelligent in their posts. It just makes you look like an ass.
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    (Original post by NathanW18)
    This.

    I see too many people trying to sound intelligent in their posts. It just makes you look like an ass.
    Ah! Someone with some sense!

    I was beginning to question whether I was the only intelligent one on here. :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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