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    Basically, what I intended to do was apply to the U.S as a Civil Engineer and then a couple of years into my course, take up a second major or a minor in Political Science and take lots of Economics courses along the way - because those are the three things I've always wanted to study. It's possible - I've done my research.

    Seeing as my school is British and provides better support to applicants to U.K unis, I figure I may as well fill out a UCAS application.

    I thought I would apply to different courses in different unis - politics or engineering and maybe one of those Ecnomics + Engineering courses.

    Genius that I am, I did not take my Personal Statement into account when I made this plan up. Obviously, I cannot apply for engineering with a politics PS or vice versa.

    So at last, I'm being forced to make a decision about what I want to do with my future and I don't like it. The U.K is my fall back option really, if I don't get into a good uni in the states, but I still don't like it.

    What would you all recommend? I'd probably be more interested in studying politics but have wanted to be an engineer for a while and find the whole field interesting.

    I don't think I want to go into Politics, it's just something I want to study.
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    Engineering - much better job prospects. Just keep up with politics as a hobby.
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    I'd study engineering and retain the interest in politics. You could always take an Open Uni course in politics if you wanted to take a course.
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    (Original post by PercyChatsworth)
    I'd study engineering and retain the interest in politics. You could always take an Open Uni course in politics if you wanted to take a course.
    Sorry, do you mind me asking what an Open Uni course is?

    I have a heavy interest in politics. I want to learn about the different political systems in depth, how they function as well as knowing their histories.
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    Lifes not all about job prospects, so study what you enjoy.
    I mean on TSR, everyones going to tell you to do engineering, and it does have better prospects.

    Bottom line (and I'm a Politics student) is that engineering will lead you into a better graduate career with more ease than Politics will.
    Don't rule out a joint degree.. if such things exist with engineering?
    You could always do engineering and do elective politics modules?
    Most degrees, particularly first years, are very flexible for that kind of thing.

    If, like a lot of people on this site, job prospects are the most important thing to you, go for engineering.
    But if your hearts not in it, whats the point?
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    (Original post by Sequin)
    Lifes not all about job prospects, so study what you enjoy.
    I mean on TSR, everyones going to tell you to do engineering, and it does have better prospects.

    Bottom line (and I'm a Politics student) is that engineering will lead you into a better graduate career with more ease than Politics will.
    Don't rule out a joint degree.. if such things exist with engineering?
    You could always do engineering and do elective politics modules?
    Most degrees, particularly first years, are very flexible for that kind of thing.

    If, like a lot of people on this site, job prospects are the most important thing to you, go for engineering.
    But if your hearts not in it, whats the point?
    No, I don't think I could work in politics day to day, regardless of the job prospects. I think I would learn more from and enjoy being an engineer more. It's just Politics fascinate me and I would find it as a more soothing thing to learn after the heavy courseload of engineering.

    Could you maybe please explain the electives system in the U.K? I don't really get it. And I don't think such a thing as a joint Politics - Engineering course exists.
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    (Original post by Sequin)
    Lifes not all about job prospects, so study what you enjoy.
    I mean on TSR, everyones going to tell you to do engineering, and it does have better prospects.

    Bottom line (and I'm a Politics student) is that engineering will lead you into a better graduate career with more ease than Politics will.
    Don't rule out a joint degree.. if such things exist with engineering?
    You could always do engineering and do elective politics modules?
    Most degrees, particularly first years, are very flexible for that kind of thing.

    If, like a lot of people on this site, job prospects are the most important thing to you, go for engineering.
    But if your hearts not in it, whats the point?
    I don't actually understand people who say this. No, i'm not saying you're wrong or whatever, infact you're probabaly right

    I was just wondering how would your employer or whatever you do know you did these modules? Coz at the end of the day, wouldn't it just say the Degree you did?
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    (Original post by bob247)
    Sorry, do you mind me asking what an Open Uni course is?
    A course at the Open University (the distance learning university)

    www.open.ac.uk

    You can take one module/course or a full degree. But you will probably be expected to pay the cost of tuition as well as buy any books. You won't get financial support if you've already got a degree (or currently studying another degree at a "brick" uni and receiving financial support for it)
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    (Original post by delasandro)
    I don't actually understand people who say this. No, i'm not saying you're wrong or whatever, infact you're probabaly right

    I was just wondering how would your employer or whatever you do know you did these modules? Coz at the end of the day, wouldn't it just say the Degree you did?
    Well I'm doing a Politics degree, but am doing some geography too, just for my own interest. It will still be a Politics degree. An employer wouldn't know unless I told them. I'm not doing them to increase my employability. I'm doing them for variety and a bit of fun.
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    (Original post by delasandro)
    I was just wondering how would your employer or whatever you do know you did these modules? Coz at the end of the day, wouldn't it just say the Degree you did?
    Some (although probalby only a very small minority) might ask for a transcript. A transcript will list all modules you've taken and the result you acheived.

    Or you can name the modules you've studied in your CV. Not that I'd do this myself as there'll be too many. If you do this then only name modules particularly relevant to the position you're applying for.

    But in the OP's case I don't think it really matters whether or not an employer knows he did politics modules. He's not looking to do politics for its career prospects but just as an interest. What's more, there's no career you can get into with a politics degree that you can't with an engineering degree as far as I'm aware.

    (Original post by Sequin)
    Don't rule out a joint degree.. if such things exist with engineering?
    No joint honours degree with politics will be accredited with a professional engineering body (e.g. IEE) as far as I'm aware.
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    (Original post by River85)
    No joint honours degree with politics will be accredited with a professional engineering body (e.g. IEE) as far as I'm aware.
    Yeah, I thought as much, and a quick google just confirmed this. Suppose you cant combine when its a vocation. It would be like a medic doing ancient history on the side.
    Can't say I knew much about it to begin with really, it was just a thought
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    (Original post by River85)
    No joint honours degree with politics will be accredited with a professional engineering body (e.g. IEE) as far as I'm aware.
    There are some engineering courses with a little bit of, say, foreign languages, or music, or something. These aren't a proper joint honours (so you're technically right), so the course won't be half and half - it'll be really heavy on the engineering with only a little of the music or language - but I reckon they'd be good courses for someone in the OP's position.

    E.g. Electronics with Music MEng at Glasgow.

    http://pn.iee.org/about/scholarships...e/accredit.cfm
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    (Original post by bob247)
    What would you all recommend? I'd probably be more interested in studying politics but have wanted to be an engineer for a while and find the whole field interesting.

    I don't think I want to go into Politics, it's just something I want to study.
    Well you don't require any specific degree to go into politics; however, if you want to be an engineer, an MEng degree is now the standard route. However, if you're more interested in studying politics, then study that - engineering is hard and during the degree you'll probably reach breaking point at least once if you are working hard enough. That's a lot to go through for someone that'd rather be studying something else, or doesn't really want to be an engineer. The people on my course are all highly motivated engineer wannabes. There is someone who did their first degree in politics, too, though.
 
 
 
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