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    (Original post by shruperstar)
    Undergrad I'm guessing? Obviously, I haven't come across too many grad students like myself to answer my queries!
    Aye, undergrad
    I thought all ye postgrads were amassing in that neighbouring thread :eek4:
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    They placed me in the wrong campus, it was John Snow at first but now Idk where I'm gonna be.
    Has any1 had this problem?
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    Well I'm finding differential equations easy at the moment, so we probably haven't gone that deep into it. There are probably more particular integrals to learn. How did you find the practical physics modules?
    There are several second order partial differential equations which we're not expected to even know how to solve - just that "the solution to a [insert name of mathematician here] equation is a [another name] function", and not even to know what the function is. It gets pretty hairy.

    Practical physics, I assume lab modules? I flit between really enjoying them, and hating their guts. First year, and start of second year, they generally feel quite short and pointless, and not enough time to finish the work required. As you get into second year, they get a lot more enjoyable because they're spread over a longer time period, and there's a lot more help available.

    A few people are worried that taking a lab module in 3rd year will drag down their grades (lab reports are our equivalent of essays, and I always get 62-68, no matter how much work I've put into them), but now I feel more reassured that they'll help me get at least a 2:1.
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    (Original post by shruperstar)
    No I didn't! I applied thru the university website! And, thank you Are you a current student at Durham?
    Ye we are all current applicants together here! Most of us still have A levels to do to fulfil our conditions, so you are one of the lucky ones as you have already got in!
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    There are several second order partial differential equations which we're not expected to even know how to solve - just that "the solution to a [insert name of mathematician here] equation is a [another name] function", and not even to know what the function is. It gets pretty hairy.

    Practical physics, I assume lab modules? I flit between really enjoying them, and hating their guts. First year, and start of second year, they generally feel quite short and pointless, and not enough time to finish the work required. As you get into second year, they get a lot more enjoyable because they're spread over a longer time period, and there's a lot more help available.

    A few people are worried that taking a lab module in 3rd year will drag down their grades (lab reports are our equivalent of essays, and I always get 62-68, no matter how much work I've put into them), but now I feel more reassured that they'll help me get at least a 2:1.
    Ah I haven't done partial differential equations yet, that will be something to learn over the summer/first year. You may be surprised that one of the conditions of my offer is an A in A Level further maths which I was surprised at considering you don't even need that for single maths for this year!
    I was relieved when I found out I only do the first lab module and your comments are reassuring that I'll get through them. I looked at a thread about university scores, saying over 80 was publishable standard, do you ever get over 70 in any of your pieces of work?
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    Ah I haven't done partial differential equations yet, that will be something to learn over the summer/first year. You may be surprised that one of the conditions of my offer is an A in A Level further maths which I was surprised at considering you don't even need that for single maths for this year!
    I was relieved when I found out I only do the first lab module and your comments are reassuring that I'll get through them. I looked at a thread about university scores, saying over 80 was publishable standard, do you ever get over 70 in any of your pieces of work?
    Partial differentiation I swear I encountered before we did them in lectures, but I can't remember where. I felt quite familiar with the concept, but actually solving the more involved ones is really horrid, and taken mathematicians a long time.

    I am very surprised about that! Do you know if that's specifically you, a NatSci thing, or a new thing for Physics?

    First labs aren't particularly difficult, just can be quite stressful when the equipment refuses to work - I had a talent for making the apparatus fail just by choosing it (once I had to move desks twice before I could get any results...), but reports are pretty hard to get wrong if you put any work into them. I still have problems with the Discussion/Conclusions sections of them, although I mainly blame that on the limited scope of the experiments we're given.

    I've heard the publishable standard thing before - I don't actually know if anyone I know has gotten that in a lab report yet. The whole point is that if that's how they calibrate the markscheme, logically lower years really shouldn't be able to get highest grades, because you would never publish their work.
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    Partial differentiation I swear I encountered before we did them in lectures, but I can't remember where. I felt quite familiar with the concept, but actually solving the more involved ones is really horrid, and taken mathematicians a long time.

    I am very surprised about that! Do you know if that's specifically you, a NatSci thing, or a new thing for Physics?

    First labs aren't particularly difficult, just can be quite stressful when the equipment refuses to work - I had a talent for making the apparatus fail just by choosing it (once I had to move desks twice before I could get any results...), but reports are pretty hard to get wrong if you put any work into them. I still have problems with the Discussion/Conclusions sections of them, although I mainly blame that on the limited scope of the experiments we're given.

    I've heard the publishable standard thing before - I don't actually know if anyone I know has gotten that in a lab report yet. The whole point is that if that's how they calibrate the markscheme, logically lower years really shouldn't be able to get highest grades, because you would never publish their work.
    I think it must be specifically for me, because I am doing that A level. I remeber the natsci guy saying AS Further maths was needed to do a major in maths but that was it. At least that is achievable for me, FP2 papers are going well so far.
    And ye physics equipment hardly ever works does it? I'll probably end up choosing the stuff that doesn't work too. In my physics ISA I couldn't work out what was going wrong, me or the equipment, and my teacher was patronising me about it, but I eventually found out it was the equipment, phew!
    So you are saying that it is easier to get higher marks as you progress through university?
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    I think it must be specifically for me, because I am doing that A level. I remeber the natsci guy saying AS Further maths was needed to do a major in maths but that was it. At least that is achievable for me, FP2 papers are going well so far.
    And ye physics equipment hardly ever works does it? I'll probably end up choosing the stuff that doesn't work too. In my physics ISA I couldn't work out what was going wrong, me or the equipment, and my teacher was patronising me about it, but I eventually found out it was the equipment, phew!
    So you are saying that it is easier to get higher marks as you progress through university?
    Well most of the equipment is fine - I just seemed to get unlucky. Or it's possible I was actually doing something slightly wrong, but the time constraints in labs meant that neither me nor the demonstrator could find a problem, and it was easier to switch equipment. Although sometimes I've even had the lab technician come in, look at it, and they've been completely clueless to the problem. It's a bit of an issue that usually the lab demonstrators have very little idea about the experiments they're running, especially in second year where it's even more important.
    It wasn't what I meant to say, sorry! It was that, for me, my lab/report marks are staying roughly the same, while I do worse on exams - so they've gone from dragging my grade down, to keeping it up.
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    Well most of the equipment is fine - I just seemed to get unlucky. Or it's possible I was actually doing something slightly wrong, but the time constraints in labs meant that neither me nor the demonstrator could find a problem, and it was easier to switch equipment. Although sometimes I've even had the lab technician come in, look at it, and they've been completely clueless to the problem. It's a bit of an issue that usually the lab demonstrators have very little idea about the experiments they're running, especially in second year where it's even more important.
    It wasn't what I meant to say, sorry! It was that, for me, my lab/report marks are staying roughly the same, while I do worse on exams - so they've gone from dragging my grade down, to keeping it up.
    What topics do you do practicals on in the first year then? And what clubs were you involved in at Durham?
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    What topics do you do practicals on in the first year then? And what clubs were you involved in at Durham?
    Oh gosh, that's going to strain my memory a bit... *some examples*
    - calculating speed of light through water?
    - atomic decay rates
    - probably some to do with refraction of light
    - possibly one involving ballistics
    It's amazing how few I can remember, actually. :-S

    I've been involved with quite a few clubs...
    - on-and-off going to the LGBTa socials (once in the past two terms...)
    - was on the Trevs choir exec last year (I want to quit, but they're in dire need of tenors this term :-/ )
    - currently on the exec of Conservation Society - mainly planting/cutting down things
    - Games Soc, on and off (card games, board games, computer games, etc)
    - gradually been inducted into the Assassins Society
    - and I know quite a bit about DUSAGG - the Scouts/Guides society, since most of my housemates are in it

    Edit: Plus 2/3 college commitees and being an open day rep last year.
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    Oh gosh, that's going to strain my memory a bit... *some examples*
    - calculating speed of light through water?
    - atomic decay rates
    - probably some to do with refraction of light
    - possibly one involving ballistics
    It's amazing how few I can remember, actually. :-S

    I've been involved with quite a few clubs...
    - on-and-off going to the LGBTa socials (once in the past two terms...)
    - was on the Trevs choir exec last year (I want to quit, but they're in dire need of tenors this term :-/ )
    - currently on the exec of Conservation Society - mainly planting/cutting down things
    - Games Soc, on and off (card games, board games, computer games, etc)
    - gradually been inducted into the Assassins Society
    - and I know quite a bit about DUSAGG - the Scouts/Guides society, since most of my housemates are in it
    Ah looks like you are an active member of the student body then, good on you! I was wondering, did you use the 'University Physics' textbook in the first year?
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    Ah looks like you are an active member of the student body then, good on you! I was wondering, did you use the 'University Physics' textbook in the first year?
    In my year, we were highly encouraged to buy the textbook by Wolfson (I'm too used to referring to authors, rather than titles, sorry, since there are a lot of similar names around). But apparently they decided this year that that was a bad idea, and I can't remember what the current Freshers are using.

    I managed to get my hands on a free copy of Tipler, which most of our lecturers still referred to, and is generally regarded as being a better book than Wolfson.

    So sorry, but I don't know about 'University Physics'.
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    In my year, we were highly encouraged to buy the textbook by Wolfson (I'm too used to referring to authors, rather than titles, sorry, since there are a lot of similar names around). But apparently they decided this year that that was a bad idea, and I can't remember what the current Freshers are using.

    I managed to get my hands on a free copy of Tipler, which most of our lecturers still referred to, and is generally regarded as being a better book than Wolfson.

    So sorry, but I don't know about 'University Physics'.
    Thats interesting, a book called 'University physics' is on the reading list for the core modules for physics, I'll wait to be told by the university waht textbooks to buy then. Thanks for your info, its been really helpful.
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    Thats interesting, a book called 'University physics' is on the reading list for the core modules for physics, I'll wait to be told by the university waht textbooks to buy then. Thanks for your info, its been really helpful.
    It's probably a good idea to buy whatever core textbook they suggest (or even better, just try to buy a second hand copy of Wolfson or Tipler off a finalist!), but it's really a waste to buy anything else on reading lists. I got a 1st last year without opening a single textbook apart from Wolfson, and this year you'll be fine if you just get a book out the library occasionally if a section is difficult.
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    It's probably a good idea to buy whatever core textbook they suggest (or even better, just try to buy a second hand copy of Wolfson or Tipler off a finalist!), but it's really a waste to buy anything else on reading lists. I got a 1st last year without opening a single textbook apart from Wolfson, and this year you'll be fine if you just get a book out the library occasionally if a section is difficult.
    Ye I'll try and find a finalist to buy it off, by finalists do you mean third years or people who have just left?
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    (Original post by LukethePianoMan)
    Ye I'll try and find a finalist to buy it off, by finalists do you mean third years or people who have just left?
    I mean third/fourth years, who are still here so you can actually get the book easily, but won't have much use for it if they still have it.
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    (Original post by Awoodrow2)
    I mean third/fourth years, who are still here so you can actually get the book easily, but won't have much use for it if they still have it.
    A third year might want to hang on to it for the general problems paper - don't chuck yours away just yet.
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    (Original post by astro67)
    A third year might want to hang on to it for the general problems paper - don't chuck yours away just yet.
    Thanks for the heads up!
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    I've received a Pre-CAS email about a week ago. How long does it normally take to receive an official CAS number? I need one to apply for a visa.

    Thanks.
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    I'm sooo excited, just hope i make my grades..
 
 
 
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