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    (Original post by imzir)
    is it possible to go from home to Oxford everyday if i wake up early in the morning. I don't want to take the extra debt of going on campus. i live in redbridge
    I've no idea where Redbridge is but you have to live within 6 miles of Carfax. Travelling in would also depend on your course and its structure, I'm guessing :yes:
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Well...

    Officially, it's not included in any offers (and probably won't ever be). However, apparently universities "like it" - some say in their FAQs that they "welcome" it - and it can't hurt any application if you've got the spare time to do it. It shows you have an ability to sustain an argument, express yourself clearly and evaluate other people's arguments, as well as all of the research and note-taking skills you'll need. It also gives you an excuse opportunity to study something which interests you but which you don't cover as part of the standard A Level syllabus. :yep:
    but i've heard that if you put it in then they are not going to talk about it in the interview as they see it less as wider reading out of your own interest and more as a ' i'm doing it for a qualification'. If i do it i want them to talk about it in the interview - if they dont i wont do it. ive already put it in my personal statement.
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    I've no idea where Redbridge is but you have to live within 6 miles of Carfax. Travelling in would also depend on your course and its structure, I'm guessing :yes:
    what if i go by tube and wake upp 6.00 in the morning. OH WAIT WILL there be lectures with big long gaps in between because then ill have nowhere to stay. To be honest i dont even want the student finance because u have to payy taht back as well. In my religion I cant pay back something with interest on it u see.
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    (Original post by imzir)
    what if i go by tube and wake upp 6.00 in the morning. OH WAIT WILL there be lectures with big long gaps in between because then ill have nowhere to stay. To be honest i dont even want the student finance because u have to payy taht back as well. In my religion I cant pay back something with interest on it u see.
    Um, if you're talking about tubes I'm guessing you're not within 6 miles of Carfax (city centre) so no, that's not an option.

    Theoretically speaking, if you qualify for the maximum bursary and government grant, the idea is that the amount is sufficient that you don't need to take out the maintenance loan. So if your family is poor enough to qualify for these maximums but you can somehow self-fund the tuition fees, you might be alright? Though I guess that's a huge contradiction... :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    No, no, more please

    My school doesn't have timetabled lessons for it.

    Thanks for the two week bit though. I started suspecting how long it would actually take when a friend told me he did his in about a week and a half in the summer holidays!

    What happens in the timetabled lessons?

    Do you know anything about how long an "investigation" has to be? My teacher showed me this sheet about it with a list of things you could do and it said that [essays?] are 5000 words and then it went on to list the other things such as "investigation", drama performance etc with no word limit or anything

    Do you really need to do alot of wider research for it or could you just use logic and A2 stuff to write it up? How is it marked?
    I misplaced the commas in that first sentence and heard "no, no more please! :woo:".

    The timetabled lessons were completely pointless. The way it worked was you had a "teacher" who was meant to watch 20 of you to check you were getting on with your work, although you were expected to do most of it at home. They couldn't really help you because they didn't teach your subject - it was whoever wasn't teaching another class at the time. Every so often, you'd have meetings with your supervisor (specialist in your subject) who'd check your progress and help you develop the content.

    As far as I know, the only two exam boards offering the EPQ are AQA and Edexcel. For AQA, if you do an essay, it's up to 5000 words. For other "artistic" stuff (e.g. a film or sculpture), you still have to write 1000 words about what you did, so it seemed easier to do the essay, especially as I'm not at all creative. :awesome:

    In terms of my project, I did Law A2 a year early, so by the time I started the EPQ I knew a fair amount about the subject I was going to base my essay on. It was shortly after the Debbie Purdy assisted suicide case, so I wrote mainly about the effects of the law on doctors in terms of ending life (assisted suicide/euthanasia), the potential for liability if they attempt dangerous rescues (e.g. a tracheotomy on an aeroplane without specialist equipment) and some discussion of the relationship between Law and morality for good measure.

    Since the reader is supposed to be a layman, I was able to discuss the law on murder as part of the euthanasia section, and the Law and morality aspect was something else I'd covered at A2. This meant that I could write 75% of my essay off the top of my head with reference to my Law textbook; the bulk of the research related to the "dangerous rescue" part because I hadn't studied that in great detail. I had about 30-40 references in all, but most of them were case citations which are of a standard format (e.g. Smith [2010] UKHL 44) so the referencing wasn't too tricky.

    I'm sure there's some rule about not being able to write about stuff you study at A Level, but I never fell foul of it. :erm:
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    (Original post by imzir)
    what if i go by tube and wake upp 6.00 in the morning. OH WAIT WILL there be lectures with big long gaps in between because then ill have nowhere to stay. To be honest i dont even want the student finance because u have to payy taht back as well. In my religion I cant pay back something with interest on it u see.
    Student loan is (currently) pegged to inflation so in nominal terms there is interest but in real terms there is none at all...I know some religions that don't allow interest do allow this.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_versus_nominal_value
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    (Original post by imzir)
    but i've heard that if you put it in then they are not going to talk about it in the interview as they see it less as wider reading out of your own interest and more as a ' i'm doing it for a qualification'. If i do it i want them to talk about it in the interview - if they dont i wont do it. ive already put it in my personal statement.
    What do you mean?

    If you mention in your PS that you've done an EPQ looking at X to improve your understanding of Y, they can't object to that as long as your claim about the benefits can be justified. I don't know enough about Medicine to tell how important the PS is (for Law, mine was barely mentioned) but I think in any case it's probably a gamble. Also, the Oxford interview system is slightly different, which could have an effect.

    At Cambridge, you have a General interview (with the Admissions Tutor) and a subject one with the Director of Studies (i.e. an expert). My PS was only mentioned in the General interview, so it's not much of a surprise that I wasn't asked about my EPQ - the interviewer may have felt that she didn't have the knowledge required for any discussion of it to be meaningful. I suspect that I'd have been grilled about it had the Law tutor mentioned it because he's on familiar ground.

    What I'm trying to say (in a rather roundabout way) is that it's not as simple as "if they won't mention it, I won't do it" - they're too unpredictable for you to adopt that strategy! :wink2:
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    (Original post by imzir)
    does the extended project qualification give an advantage over people who aren't doing it? does that apply for medicine as well?
    If my sources prove me correctly, apparently, either no or not many schools give out predicted grades so I had a plan which was to sign up for it and then if I come out with a U then so be it. But then I started hearing stories about how some universities might ask for a lower standard offer but with a certain grade in EPQ. But then (2), I heard stories about how this doesn't occur very often. Hopefully, my awesome-nating plan is flawless...oui? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    Student loan is (currently) pegged to inflation so in nominal terms there is interest but in real terms there is none at all...I know some religions that don't allow interest do allow this.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_versus_nominal_value
    I'm a muslim but I don't know anything about economics. Using the google search engine I can't see whether I am allowed or not?
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    (Original post by imzir)
    I'm a muslim but I don't know anything about economics. Using the google search engine I can't see whether I am allowed or not?
    I'm still looking, but here - the first part supports what Jordan656 said.

    EDIT: There's no official guidance on it on the Directgov website - it looks like a matter of personal choice...

    http://www.central-mosque.com/fiqh/stuloan.htm
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    (Original post by imzir)
    I'm a muslim but I don't know anything about economics. Using the google search engine I can't see whether I am allowed or not?
    I don't know - isn't there someone you can ask?

    Basically it means that the number of pounds you repay will have a larger number, so you borrow 3000 and pay back 3300, but what you could buy with 3000 when you took the loan now costs 3300, so really you're jusst making sure the government doesn't lose anything on the deal, and the value of what you pay back is the same even though the number is different.
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    I don't know - isn't there someone you can ask?

    Basically it means that the number of pounds you repay will have a larger number, so you borrow 3000 and pay back 3300, but what you could buy with 3000 when you took the loan now costs 3300, so really you're jusst making sure the government doesn't lose anything on the deal, and the value of what you pay back is the same even though the number is different.
    OK i've found out that I cant take the student loan out because it is in a way interest. Assuming I get a bursary which will be about £3,000 a year will i be able to cope on that only? If I dont get student finance nor a bursary can i still cope then?
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    (Original post by imzir)
    OK i've found out that I cant take the student loan out because it is in a way interest. Assuming I get a bursary which will be about £3,000 a year will i be able to cope on that only? If I dont get student finance nor a bursary can i still cope then?
    I don't know, I'm not a student yet. I guess ask someone who has been there.

    Pretty sure from what I have read though that you have to be taking a student loan to qualify for the bursary.
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    (Original post by imzir)
    OK i've found out that I cant take the student loan out because it is in a way interest. Assuming I get a bursary which will be about £3,000 a year will i be able to cope on that only? If I dont get student finance nor a bursary can i still cope then?
    If you can't put together £10,000 a year, you won't be able to afford to go to university. Fees are probably going up soon too, which will further increase the amount you need to find. Unless you're from a wealthy family, you won't be able to go to university without taking out loans.
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    i guess it may be no choice for me and many others like me.
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    I'm a pretty quiet person who doesn't drink, like clubbing, am not that confident etc. I never really even considered Oxford until recently. I want to do Geography and recently learnt that the places:applications ratio is very low! Only around 1:4! My predicted grades are also higher than their entry requirements. The thing I am scared most about is the interview and my thinking that Oxford has tonnes of confident, well spoken people which I am not. Should I apply? :o:

    My first/highest choice was LSE because I was told that LSE has loads of quiet people. I'm not exactly mute but I'm just not extremely extroverted.
    I wouldn't apply if I was you. Oxford usually takes interesting, slightly eccentric people with something different to offer. You sound like none of those things.

    If you aren't confident how are you going to get anywhere in life?
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    Give it a try! You can apply for four other unis, and you'll always wonder what would have happened if you don't try! I understand why you're nervous, but you might surprise yourself in interview. I applied to Cambridge and really surprised myself by enjoying my interview, and I think it went pretty well - I've always been pretty shy, but it's definitely easier talking about something you're passionate about.
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    I'm a pretty quiet person who doesn't drink, like clubbing, am not that confident etc. I never really even considered Oxford until recently. I want to do Geography and recently learnt that the places:applications ratio is very low! Only around 1:4! My predicted grades are also higher than their entry requirements. The thing I am scared most about is the interview and my thinking that Oxford has tonnes of confident, well spoken people which I am not. Should I apply? :o:

    My first/highest choice was LSE because I was told that LSE has loads of quiet people. I'm not exactly mute but I'm just not extremely extroverted.
    I don't drink or go clubbing and I'm enjoying it there. And there are plenty of people much quieter than me! Go for it :-)
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    I misplaced the commas in that first sentence and heard "no, no more please! :woo:".

    The timetabled lessons were completely pointless. The way it worked was you had a "teacher" who was meant to watch 20 of you to check you were getting on with your work, although you were expected to do most of it at home. They couldn't really help you because they didn't teach your subject - it was whoever wasn't teaching another class at the time. Every so often, you'd have meetings with your supervisor (specialist in your subject) who'd check your progress and help you develop the content.

    As far as I know, the only two exam boards offering the EPQ are AQA and Edexcel. For AQA, if you do an essay, it's up to 5000 words. For other "artistic" stuff (e.g. a film or sculpture), you still have to write 1000 words about what you did, so it seemed easier to do the essay, especially as I'm not at all creative. :awesome:

    In terms of my project, I did Law A2 a year early, so by the time I started the EPQ I knew a fair amount about the subject I was going to base my essay on. It was shortly after the Debbie Purdy assisted suicide case, so I wrote mainly about the effects of the law on doctors in terms of ending life (assisted suicide/euthanasia), the potential for liability if they attempt dangerous rescues (e.g. a tracheotomy on an aeroplane without specialist equipment) and some discussion of the relationship between Law and morality for good measure.

    Since the reader is supposed to be a layman, I was able to discuss the law on murder as part of the euthanasia section, and the Law and morality aspect was something else I'd covered at A2. This meant that I could write 75% of my essay off the top of my head with reference to my Law textbook; the bulk of the research related to the "dangerous rescue" part because I hadn't studied that in great detail. I had about 30-40 references in all, but most of them were case citations which are of a standard format (e.g. Smith [2010] UKHL 44) so the referencing wasn't too tricky.

    I'm sure there's some rule about not being able to write about stuff you study at A Level, but I never fell foul of it. :erm:
    How many books do you reckon I need to read (as a bare minimum)?

    And what do you mean by "Case citations"? :confused:
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    (Original post by Stefan1991)
    If you aren't confident how are you going to get anywhere in life?
    I wonder this myself too.

    I am confident enough to think that I can satisfy at least AAB sooooo, as long as most of my places are around that requirement (which virtually all are), I don't think I cna do that wrong in terms of grade requirements.

    ALthough...I have heard stories about unis asking some applicants for higher grades than their minimum requirement (due to weak personal statement or something) :confused: To what extent is this true? :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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