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    Hello again :p:

    I'm sitting here wondering if I should have applied to Oxford too.. My school's internal deadline for Oxbridge applicants was 2 weeks ago, so they won't let me apply anyway XD
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    (Original post by CityOfMyHeart)
    Hello again :p:

    I'm sitting here wondering if I should have applied to Oxford too.. My school's internal deadline for Oxbridge applicants was 2 weeks ago, so they won't let me apply anyway XD
    Hey

    Screw the internal deadline! My own internal deadline is next week but suppose I apply to Oxford, I plan on giving it later than this and send it independently. You should definitely apply - I don't know you very well but you have awesome grades and everything so definitely worth a shot
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    (Original post by Rayel)
    If you think you have the academic rigour to study at Oxford
    What type of "academic rigour" are Oxford looking for?:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    Hey

    Screw the internal deadline! My own internal deadline is next week but suppose I apply to Oxford, I plan on giving it later than this and send it independently. You should definitely apply - I don't know you very well but you have awesome grades and everything so definitely worth a shot
    I really don't have a clue on how to go about that though. My school made such a huge deal about applying to Oxbridge - we had all these talks to put people off applying even though most people have AAA predictions or more. They keep sending out lists via email as well - 'Is this everyone applying to Oxbridge? Let me know asap if you're not on here' - and keep talking about the colleges and stuff so...

    *sigh*

    I've also realised the internal deadline for personal statements is the 8th of October. WHAT THE ****. That's 2 weeks. I haven't even started, as you know! XD
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    (Original post by CityOfMyHeart)
    I really don't have a clue on how to go about that though. My school made such a huge deal about applying to Oxbridge - we had all these talks to put people off applying even though most people have AAA predictions or more. They keep sending out lists via email as well - 'Is this everyone applying to Oxbridge? Let me know asap if you're not on here' - and keep talking about the colleges and stuff so...

    *sigh*

    I've also realised the internal deadline for personal statements is the 8th of October. WHAT THE ****. That's 2 weeks. I haven't even started, as you know! XD
    Oohh that's early :eek: Good luck (and have fun!)
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    What type of "academic rigour" are Oxford looking for?:rolleyes:
    You can see the Geography selection criteria at http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/undergradua...-criteria.html

    Generally, Oxford want people who are sufficiently engaged by the subject to spend three well-motivated years studying it intensely, who are prepared to work hard, and who will benefit from the tutorial system.

    Being shy is not a problem; I'd say that I am shy too. It's good to be thoughtful and measured in your answers at interview; you're not there to bubble over with social chat! What you must not do is sit there staring at your shoes, and then mumble!
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    How many books do you reckon I need to read (as a bare minimum)?

    And what do you mean by "Case citations"? :confused:
    It's not about "reading books", it's about research. In my case, the ethical debates about Law and morality are pretty old, so you'll find them in books, but in terms of knowing what the law is, the Internet (and my latest edition Law textbook) was most helpful because it was up to date.

    In total, I think I had maybe five books and some journals, but I didn't read them all from cover to cover - I used the index to find the relevant sections, and went from there.

    Case citations are the standard way of lawyers writing the names of cases so others can find them. As an example:

    Donoghue v Stevenson [1931] UKHL 3

    The citation tells you the names of the parties in the case - the first is suing the second here; we know it's a civil case because if it were a criminal prosecution, the first party would be "R" (Regina, effectively the State).

    The year in brackets is the year the case was reported in law reports. The letters relate to which court heard the case (UK House of Lords), and the number is - I think - which volume of the law reports it can be found in. :yep:
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    Oohh that's early :eek: Good luck (and have fun!)
    You too! Let me know how you're getting on with your personal statement and applications
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    (Original post by Stefan1991)
    I wouldn't apply if I was you. Oxford usually takes interesting, slightly eccentric people with something different to offer. You sound like none of those things.

    If you aren't confident how are you going to get anywhere in life?
    Whether you are confident or quiet does not affect how interesting or individual you are.

    Oxford are not looking for the confident, polished 'finished product'. They are looking for potential; someone who is very intelligent, dedicated to their subject, who will be interesting to teach and who will respond to their teaching methods.

    I would say to definitely apply! When I made my application , I wasn't very confident either, but it doesn't matter. The best way to think about the interview is to consider it as an academic exercise, and try not to worry about how you appear. The tutors there aren't trying to catch you out; they want to help you to demonstrate your potential. My interviews were very informal, only lasted 15 mins each and the tutors interviewing me were friendly. There are usually only one or two of them, so it's not like you're being interrogated by a panel! I was asked to talk about a passage that they had given be 20mins beforehand. You need to think laterally, and consider fully the questions that they ask you, and demonstrate your thinking process. As long as you can stay calm enough to respond to any tasks they give you, it won't matter if you're shy or nervous - they don't make their judgements based on that.Don't be put off by other candidates who boast about how well their interview went, and don't be intimidated by anyone - be sure in your own abilities: Oxford will have invited you to interview because they really think you're good enough, and you have just as much chance of winning a place as anyone else.
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    Definitely go for it!
    I felt exactly the same before i applied. I'm useless talking in front of groups and don't enjoy giving presentations etc and didn't know whether i'd cut it because of my shyness. You'll be surprised though; if you're passionate about your subject it will definitely come across to your interviewers.
    Also, you're more likely to find a lot of like-minded people there with the same work ethic and interest in their subject which will boost your confidence. Not everyone will be hugely confident, it's the same as any other university.

    I think you'll regret it later if you decide not to apply because of your confidence, don't let it stop you doing what you want to do
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    (Original post by Banzaii)
    What type of "academic rigour" are Oxford looking for?:rolleyes:
    Well if I knew absolutly exactly what they wanted I would be charging huge amounts of money to tell people - I might even be there myself! :p:

    But really it's just about genuine passion for your subject and evidence of wider reading. Being hard working and dedicated and stuff come as standard. Same for most Uni's but I imagine Oxbridge just want you to want it a little bit more.

    Though you're better off emailing a tutor and asking them
 
 
 
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