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    (Original post by Tortious)
    1. Not necessarily - if you can engage in intelligent discussion about the topic beyond the basics, it'll help to convince them that you're genuinely interested. A good way of doing that might be to look at any developments in that area of law. For instance, if I were to discuss Criminal, I could refer to the Law Commission's proposals for reform of homicide (assuming I knew a little about the problems with the current law); someone who knows that murder is "intending to kill someone and killing them" wouldn't be able to do that.

    2. There's no "proving wrong" at interview - unless you've read all of their books, you probably won't know what views they hold and they'll always argue the opposing case anyway. It shouldn't matter what your opinion is if you can argue your case convincingly, which is what they're really interested in.

    Honestly though, you're worrying about this a little too much. They won't have time to waste on asking you about stuff in your PS because they want to see how you cope under pressure and think on your feet, not how well you can deliver rehearsed answers.
    Oh no, I know that they won't question me about the PS a lot. My PS is about Jurisprudence, but if I were to be asked which of the first year topics I'm most interested in, the answer would be Constitutional.

    Since I'm mainly interested in Jurisprudence I haven't really read much about Constitutional. Would something like the effects of the Constitutional Reform Act and the creation of the Supreme Court be recent enough or is that far too old?
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Oh no, I know that they won't question me about the PS a lot. My PS is about Jurisprudence, but if I were to be asked which of the first year topics I'm most interested in, the answer would be Constitutional.

    Since I'm mainly interested in Jurisprudence I haven't really read much about Constitutional. Would something like the effects of the Constitutional Reform Act and the creation of the Supreme Court be recent enough or is that far too old?
    Hmmm...I'm not sure - I haven't done much Constit since the AS was fairly superficial. :sigh:

    As far as I know, the Supreme Court is the most recent major development, although The West Wing might have a better idea. Also, it's worth bearing in mind that they may ask about the second year options of interest to you - according to my sixth form, some people make the mistake of only looking at what's covered in the first year.
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Hmmm...I'm not sure - I haven't do
    ne much Constit since the AS was fairly superficial. :sigh:

    As far as I know, the Supreme Court is the most recent major development, although The West Wing might have a better idea. Also, it's worth bearing in mind that they may ask about the second year options of interest to you - according to my sixth form, some people make the mistake of only looking at what's covered in the first year.
    Cool. S'good that I already anticipated that they might ask about second year options! I think I actually know the whole degree structure off by heart tbh...

    Anyway, thanks for the help! :hugs: I'll rep you later on. Good night (morning?)

    EDIT: Before I sleep I'd like to know your AS UMS scores. I messed up and scraped As in 3 subjects (2 of them really took me by surprise) but only got 90+ in one subject. I've got a reeeaaally slim chance of getting an offer, and so the interview is my only hope.
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Cool. S'good that I already anticipated that they might ask about second year options! I think I actually know the whole degree structure off by heart tbh...

    Anyway, thanks for the help! :hugs: I'll rep you later on. Good night (morning?)
    Night Morning

    Bye.
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Night Morning

    Bye.
    Sorry, but can you check the edit in my last post? It only occured to me to ask you now!
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Sorry, but can you check the edit in my last post? It only occured to me to ask you now!
    I'll PM you.

    EDIT: Your message box is full. :p: Here's what I was trying to send, but you'll need to clear space for the message to be forwarded.

    Spoiler:
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    Hi,

    I'm not really a typical applicant because I had 5 A2s before I applied. However, looking at my ongoing AS subjects, I had something like:

    Physics - 295/300 (89/90, 150/150 and whatever the other works out at :p:)
    History - can't remember, but over 90%
    English Lit - about 177/180 (just shy of 90% but I got them to predict an A*).

    If you perform well at interview, you could still be in with a chance. Strange as this sounds, they're not looking for a reason to make you an offer - if you get an interview, they're looking for a reason to reject you and narrow down the applicants. All you have to do is not give them that reason.

    I've got a PM I sent to someone the other day about interview advice and preparation - you might find it helpful, so I'll forward it to you. :yep:
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Thanks very much - I haven't got the book yet because it's a draft chapter from his new edition (he sent it as summer reading), but I can give you the argument in context later tomorrow/today.

    The examples you give are rather odd in that they seem to be in the middle of the public/private Venn diagram. I can see that because they're crimes, they're "wrongs against the State", but aren't they closer to being "wrongs against an individual" (and therefore private wrongs)? As a relative layman (:p:) I'd say they're "definitely torts" because there's an identifiable individual who's been harmed. As an example of a public wrong, McBride gives destroying a rare bird's nest - that doesn't cause harm to a specific individual so it's not a tort because it's not a private wrong.

    I think what confused me was that he said a tort can be thought of as a "civil wrong", where a "wrong" can be public or private, but he didn't really link that back to what type of wrong a tort is until the residual wrongs part.

    Thanks again for your help.

    I see what's going on now, he's getting at the fundamental debate in tort, which is whether it's wrong based or duty based. Wrongs based theorists argue that the purpose of tort is to vindicate wrongs (e.g. you punched me, I fell and broke my leg, you have to pay me for my loss), where as duty based theorists argue that it's about duties (e.g. you have a duty to drive carefully, if you drink and drive off the road you have to pay me for the loss I suffer when you run over my leg).

    I think they are definitely torts as well as well as crimes. The reason destroying a rare bird's nest doesn't give rise to an action in tort is because nobody has been wronged (in the wrongs based approach, a duty based approach would argue it's not a tort because you have no duty to act prudently around birds nests), that's how Nick McBride sees it. It can be a criminal action if at law it's defined as a public wrong, but there is no way that can be a private law wrong (unless we give personhood to birds)

    Edit: I've just looked in my lecture handout - this is definitely about this point. Nick McBride is a well known legal rebel in tort and this is one of the theories he's most well known for. He's a self-professed 'idealist'.

    He's an absolutely amazing man and I loved his lectures, but definitely don't rely entirely on his text book as he doesn't give the established view, and you may tie yourself in knots if you don't have a full picture. My recommendation is Winfield and Jolowicz.
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    (Original post by The West Wing)
    I see what's going on now, he's getting at the fundamental debate in tort, which is whether it's wrong based or duty based. Wrongs based theorists argue that the purpose of tort is to vindicate wrongs (e.g. you punched me, I fell and broke my leg, you have to pay me for my loss), where as duty based theorists argue that it's about duties (e.g. you have a duty to drive carefully, if you drink and drive off the road you have to pay me for the loss I suffer when you run over my leg).

    I think they are definitely torts as well as well as crimes. The reason destroying a rare bird's nest doesn't give rise to an action in tort is because nobody has been wronged (in the wrongs based approach, a duty based approach would argue it's not a tort because you have no duty to act prudently around birds nests), that's how Nick McBride sees it. It can be a criminal action if at law it's defined as a public wrong, but there is no way that can be a private law wrong (unless we give personhood to birds)

    Edit: I've just looked in my lecture handout - this is definitely about this point. Nick McBride is a well known legal rebel in tort and this is one of the theories he's most well known for. He's a self-professed 'idealist'.
    :giggle:

    So what does this mean about "what the law says" on whether public wrongs are torts? Would it be fair to say that they can be, but aren't always (unlike private wrongs, which are)? I'm sure you've answered this point, but I can't quite make the link.

    EDIT: I think I've got it now! Thanks again - I'll rep you soon.
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    thanks everyone
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    :five:

    To be honest, everybody has read "What About Law?" and "Letters to a Law Student" - especially at Pembroke, since Nick McBride is the DoS! :p: I doubt they'll mention it because it's not particularly unique. In my General interview, the interviewer barely referred to my PS; it was a case of "I can see you're clearly interested in Law. Tell me about a book you've read." (I deliberately picked one from the SAQ form which wasn't about Law.) As for the Law interview, they were more interested in my Law Test and the scenarios I'd been given to look at 15 minutes before.

    Have you studied Law before?
    No I haven't studied Law before, I'm in year 13 and just sent my application off.
    I heard from a few others that they do not really refer to PS so that's reassuring .
    Thanks for you help
    Apart from UMS what else do you have to put on the SAQ?
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    I'll PM you.

    EDIT: Your message box is full. :p: Here's what I was trying to send, but you'll need to clear space for the message to be forwarded.

    Spoiler:
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    Hi,

    I'm not really a typical applicant because I had 5 A2s before I applied. However, looking at my ongoing AS subjects, I had something like:

    Physics - 295/300 (89/90, 150/150 and whatever the other works out at :p:)
    History - can't remember, but over 90%
    English Lit - about 177/180 (just shy of 90% but I got them to predict an A*).

    If you perform well at interview, you could still be in with a chance. Strange as this sounds, they're not looking for a reason to make you an offer - if you get an interview, they're looking for a reason to reject you and narrow down the applicants. All you have to do is not give them that reason.

    I've got a PM I sent to someone the other day about interview advice and preparation - you might find it helpful, so I'll forward it to you. :yep:
    Cleared a few messages now.

    Hmm, why did you have 5 A2's? Were you a reapplicant? Awesome UMS btw, but people like you are the reason why I have such a slim chance! :rolleyes:

    I get what you're saying about the interview, but what if they decide beforehand when they see that my grades are weaker than everybody elses? :eek3: Ie they decide to reject me if I slip up just a teensy bit in interview.
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Cleared a few messages now.

    Hmm, why did you have 5 A2's? Were you a reapplicant? Awesome UMS btw, but people like you are the reason why I have such a slim chance! :rolleyes:

    I get what you're saying about the interview, but what if they decide beforehand when they see that my grades are weaker than everybody elses? :eek3: Ie they decide to reject me if I slip up just a teensy bit in interview.
    Not quite - I self-taught my A2s before going to college but then started some more, so I wasn't applying pre- or post-results. :p:

    I wouldn't worry about everyone else's qualifications in that sense. If you're good enough to go to Cambridge but your college can't take you, you'll be pooled and another college could still decide to make you an offer. I happen to know that some colleges have never had the luxury of having too many "Cambridge standard" applicants for places - they could take more, if they found enough of them.

    Also, slipping up a teensy bit in interview won't matter. Interviewers appreciate that you're nervous, so the important thing is that you try and overcome the nerves. If you make a mistake, as long as you handle it well, they won't mind. If they point out a massive flaw in your argument, that's OK, as long as you recognise that your position can't be supported. Review your answer to the scenario accordingly, give your reasoning and go from there. :yep:
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    (Original post by anoushka1)
    No I haven't studied Law before, I'm in year 13 and just sent my application off.
    I heard from a few others that they do not really refer to PS so that's reassuring .
    Thanks for you help
    Apart from UMS what else do you have to put on the SAQ?
    Ummm...I can't really remember, but it's all done online and it's like a more in-depth UCAS form.

    There's a personal details section (note: apparently the photo is the one used on your ID card if you go there...wish I'd known! :woo:), then they ask about your qualifications in more detail. You give the name of each unit in the qualification and the topics it covers, although you don't have many characters, so don't worry about abbreviations.

    They also have a section for anything else you'd like to add (that's pretty much what it's called!) - it allows you to mention things that wouldn't fit in your PS, such as books you've read or relevant work experience, and maybe anything that your referee didn't/couldn't mention in your reference. I'm not sure about the last one though.
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    I didn't get asked a single question on the books I wrote in my PS or SAQ.
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Not quite - I self-taught my A2s before going to college but then started some more, so I wasn't applying pre- or post-results. :p:

    I wouldn't worry about everyone else's qualifications in that sense. If you're good enough to go to Cambridge but your college can't take you, you'll be pooled and another college could still decide to make you an offer. I happen to know that some colleges have never had the luxury of having too many "Cambridge standard" applicants for places - they could take more, if they found enough of them.

    Also, slipping up a teensy bit in interview won't matter. Interviewers appreciate that you're nervous, so the important thing is that you try and overcome the nerves. If you make a mistake, as long as you handle it well, they won't mind. If they point out a massive flaw in your argument, that's OK, as long as you recognise that your position can't be supported. Review your answer to the scenario accordingly, give your reasoning and go from there. :yep:
    Self-taught A2's BEFORE college?!?! :zomg:

    Regarding the pool system, somebody with my academics is unlikely to be pooled or picked up by the pool even with an amazing I terview. :sadnod:

    Thanks for all the advice and info though! Could you PM me the interview advice stuff please?
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    That's excellent. Very few people have a bigger ego than academics. Quote it once or twice and say what a stupendous book you found it to be. I do it all the time.
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    I did that too, unintentionally, and only realised a week before interview.

    Fortunately he didn't question me on that, not that I would have been unable to answer as I was sincere in finding what I wrote interesting, and I had read around it too, but the pressure of telling the author of a book about his own work would have been quite high!
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    (Original post by anoushka1)
    Yes it is! It is Janet O'Sullivan so the chapter on contract law
    Well, in my personal statement I just mentioned the chapter on criminal law so I could just expand on that
    Ha ha, don't worry. Mrs O'Sullivan is lovely and won't start questioning you about her chapter - except for maybe some ideas. But if you want to apply there, just do it; she won't be mean (she supervised me for tort this year so i can attest to how lovely she is She showed one of my essays to her little daughter because i'd drawn a sad face on it and apparently it was so cute, she just had to show her daughter how her students reacted to essays )
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    (Original post by Doughnuts!!)
    Self-taught A2's BEFORE college?!?! :zomg:

    Regarding the pool system, somebody with my academics is unlikely to be pooled or picked up by the pool even with an amazing I terview. :sadnod:

    Thanks for all the advice and info though! Could you PM me the interview advice stuff please?
    Sorry, I completely forgot! :teehee: I'll send it now, honest!
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    (Original post by Tortious)
    Sorry, I completely forgot! :teehee: I'll send it now, honest!
    I LOVE YOU SO MUCH! :love:

    That PM was so helpful. I'll rep you now.
 
 
 
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