Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Basically I have always wanted to become a physiotherapist, however securing a place has been a struggle. I have secured a place for next year however this year I have been offered a place on an osteopathy degree, a subject I am also very interested in...

    I would like to know the peoples opinions on each career (pros cons) and what they would do.

    Cheers
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Way I understand it is that with osteo, it's a longer degree and you focus a bit more on manipulations than a physio does. In order to be able to manipulate spines for instance as a physio, you have to do a year long masters (MACP). I think that as a physio, you go a lot more into areas such as respiratory and cardiac than osteos do, but I don't know fully what an osteo course entails so I could be wrong. I am about to start my second year on a physio course and have enjoyed pretty much everything so far. One big thing that maybe you might want to think about is that at the moment physios are the only strand of rehab therapists that are employed within the NHS. Qualifying as an osteo it's pretty much private practice or nothing which is possibly why the course takes longer as you have to be that much more polished upon graduation, as opposed to spending a couple of years as a junior after graduating before you are recognised as being fully competent.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    thanks for your input ironmike.

    your right about physio having more scope, from what I have read osteopaths seem to be very similar to musculoskeletal physios (although I am not completely sure about the techniques used).

    Missing uni means I will be 21 when I start which is a bit scary... Ive been looking into doing an nvq in personal training to pursue a job in a gym for a year before I go next year
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    you can manipulate spines without a masters, you can do it as part of a physio degree. The thing you need extra training for (and not necessarily a masters) is what are known as grade V manipulations, which are more like what osteos do (or at least what people think of as osteo, my osteo friend says they do other levels of manips as well).

    Osteos are more specialised but personally I think the boradness of physio is interesting and often useful even for a patient who outwardly may be a musculoskeletal patient. In real life problems don't always fit neatly into boxes. Osteos also don't get funded for the degree.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank for your input iainmacn.

    I found this interesting article comparing the two professions, although it is a little biased towards osteopathy. http://www.osteopath-help.co.uk/oste...siotherapy.pdf

    It doesnt seem to be anywhere near as popular as physio, this may be due to the fact that you cannot be employed by the nhs but apparently it is very easy to find work
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    There are also far fewer training places given there are 7 unis for osteo, so I guess that has an impact on the number of osteos around. One option would be to do an osteo degree and then try to get onto a masters in physio. This route would take you around 6 years, but then you would have them both. The Msc physio route is 18 months of training I believe. I think you can do it the other way round too training as a physio and then doing an osteo course for 3 years from memory. If it were me, I would (and did) choose physio as I think it opens up a lot more doors for you upon graduation. I also want to work within the NHS, and when I started my course, physio was the only option allowing me to do that. The point about getting an NHS bursary is valid too when thinking about how to fund your training. As for being 21 when you start, don't stress about that at all - I was 31 :-)
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: September 26, 2010
The home of Results and Clearing

2,411

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. Keele University
    General Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 19 Aug '18
  2. University of Melbourne
    Open Day Undergraduate
    Sun, 19 Aug '18
  3. Sheffield Hallam University
    City Campus Undergraduate
    Tue, 21 Aug '18
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.