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    I don't think there is much in the world which is 'impossible'. However, that is a big goal in a short time period.
    I think you could certainly become very good, perhaps even fluent in them all over your lifetime. I guess it depends how good you are at learning languages!

    I am fluent in English (mother tongue) and German... I want to learn more languages and particularly want to become fluent in Italian. But I am slightly put off by the fact it has taken me so long to become fluent in German- and I live here haha xD
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    Well, my dad speaks six fluently. Ofc it's possible, better get on with it though.
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    (Original post by Miss_Scarlet)
    I don't think there is much in the world which is 'impossible'. However, that is a big goal in a short time period.
    I think you could certainly become very good, perhaps even fluent in them all over your lifetime. I guess it depends how good you are at learning languages!
    To tell you the truth, I don't know if I'm good at languages. All I know is that I want to learn them. You see, my school never offered foreign languages (and it is too late for me to pick it up in January when I go to the UK), so I have no system to gauge my ability on.

    It is a big dream! :yes: And I love dreaming big!

    (Original post by Bubbles*de*Milo)
    Well, my dad speaks six fluently. Ofc it's possible, better get on with it though.
    I'm on it!
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    I want to do something similar, I think it's definitely possible

    Although atm I am only fluent in English and barely semi-fluent in Japanese, but at uni i'm planning on learning Spanish and other languages that hopefully don't take as long to learn as Japanese :P
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    (Original post by laryxle)
    I want to do something similar, I think it's definitely possible

    Although atm I am only fluent in English and barely semi-fluent in Japanese, but at uni i'm planning on learning Spanish and other languages that hopefully don't take as long to learn as Japanese :P
    あなたならきっと出来る :yes: 頑張ってね♥

    A language is long to learn only if you make it long to learn!
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    ...
    I think that dream is perfectly possible, I also have about 9 languages I want to learn throughout my life. I think being fluent in them all before you're 30 would be asking a bit much though! Even most hardcore polyglots go into old age before reaching fluency in that many languages! And it wouldn't really be a life goal unless you put all of your life into it rather than just a 3rd of your life now would it! :p: I personally wouldn't mind if I spent my entire life learning the languages as it's what I enjoy the most (and travelling, culture etc.) and I assume you feel the same, so it's win-win really
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    Thank you! I definitely will!

    I am seriously considering pursuing a period of language study in Switzerland. However, different languages are spoken in different regions, right? Are there cities where all three languages are being spoken equally?
    Yeah. German's spoken in the North/East.
    French in the West/South and there are some Italian communities in the South. (Pretty much corresponding with the respective borders of neighbouring countries' national languages).

    Whilst there are areas which are typically 'French' or 'German', the vast majority of people would be able to talk to you in both.

    Montreal (Canada) is good for this sort of thing, whilst French is mainly spoken, everyone has some amount of English, plus there are so many 'insular' communities there, that there are areas that speak other languages. Pretty much every language under the sun is represented to some degree in Montreal.
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    (Original post by MarcD)
    I think that dream is perfectly possible, I also have about 9 languages I want to learn throughout my life. I think being fluent in them all before you're 30 would be asking a bit much though! Even most hardcore polyglots go into old age before reaching fluency in that many languages! And it wouldn't really be a life goal unless you put all of your life into it rather than just a 3rd of your life now would it! :p: I personally wouldn't mind if I spent my entire life learning the languages as it's what I enjoy the most (and travelling, culture etc.) and I assume you feel the same, so it's win-win really
    I think I've mentioned it in another post, but the only reason why I set that 25~30 limit is because I want to motivate myself harder!

    Precisely. I love the fact that we're thinking on the same wavelength :hugs:
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    Depends how old you are and whether you have a good sound knowledge of grammar- you should invest in that first.

    Next consider maintaining the languages once you've learned them. They will only stick if you use them regularly enough (especially with hanzi/kanji)- so only learn languages you are sure you'll use. For every person there is an optimum number of languages- a point where you can comfortably maintain them without any of them slipping. In this regard, I think you've chosen too many (unless you plan to work as a linguist the rest of your life).

    That said, the 3 romance languages should be easy as there are so many similarities. Once you get to your third you can reach an advanced level in 2 months easily. With mandarin AND japanese I think you've bitten off more than you can chew- I think you're underestimating the work involved. Indonesian, while gramatically simple, might not have many uses (depends entirely on you) so consider whether it is or isnt totally superfluous.

    Is it possible- Yes, but with provisos. By the time you're 25, yes, possibly provided you have the right methods and background knowledge of grammar. By the time you're 30, yes, provided you have the perseverence to stick it out!
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    I think I've mentioned it in another post, but the only reason why I set that 25~30 limit is because I want to motivate myself harder!

    Precisely. I love the fact that we're thinking on the same wavelength :hugs:
    Ohh I get you, that's a good idea actually! Means you'll really be immersing yourself in the languages and keeping engaged

    There's a lot of similarity in our languages too, I wanna be fluent in:

    English, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Russian, Arabic, Korean, Mandarin & Tagalog/Cebuano (I've paired those in one as they're two different dialects of Filipino and pretty similar to each other).

    My main interests lie in the Asian languages though. Just got back from a 3 month trip around Asia actually and I've fallen in love with Asia even more now! Still haven't been to Japan yet though, ironic considering Japanese is what started my love for languages!!
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    (Original post by DJ_Black)
    Yeah. German's spoken in the North/East.
    French in the West/South and there are some Italian communities in the South. (Pretty much corresponding with the respective borders of neighbouring countries' national languages).

    Whilst there are areas which are typically 'French' or 'German', the vast majority of people would be able to talk to you in both.

    Montreal (Canada) is good for this sort of thing, whilst French is mainly spoken, everyone has some amount of English, plus there are so many communities there, that their are areas that speak other languages. Pretty much every language under the sun is represented to some degree in Montreal.
    I am finding this very fascinating, considering Switzerland's sheer size (or lack thereof )

    If I were to travel to Switzerland one day, I would probably just stop by at Zürich and live there for a while. I heard the land is indescribably lovely, so that's a bonus!

    Montreal sounds like a great place for languages! I have also heard that Canadian French differs from the French from France. I do want to learn enough French to understand both, so which variant should I start with?
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    The dream: To be fluent in English, Spanish, Japanese, Mandarin, Russian, Indonesian, French, German & Portuguese (+ other languages if it goes well) before the age of 25~30.

    Thoughts anyone? Is it possible? Impossible? Go ahead, write all you wish. Don't forget to give your reasons! I always need more inspiration from both encouragement and discouragement to keep on going
    It's best to learn by total immersion in other languages, so I would become a polygamist with wives and children in all of those countries. That's the easiest way.
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    (Original post by Ilios_Lampros)
    With mandarin AND japanese I think you've bitten off more than you can chew- I think you're underestimating the work involved.
    While they are both very difficult languages to learn, surely learning them together is somewhat beneficial? I found that I coped more easily with the Hanzi when I started learning Mandarin as I'd already gotten experience in the script from Kanji. Aside from the fact that I was able to recognise more characters than those who hadn't studied Japanese, it meant writing out the characters came more naturally to me.

    But yes, by no means are they languages to be taken lightly! Especially Mandarin, I still struggle with the tones -.-
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    To tell you the truth, I don't know if I'm good at languages. All I know is that I want to learn them. You see, my school never offered foreign languages (and it is too late for me to pick it up in January when I go to the UK), so I have no system to gauge my ability on.

    It is a big dream! :yes: And I love dreaming big!



    I'm on it!

    I think you can become good or very good at languages, but becoming fluent takes longer and I think it helps if you spend time living in the country where the language is spoken. I don't think it is impossible to become fluent in so many, but try to be realistic with your goal else you may get tired of not achieving it in a short time. I'd begin with the other European languages...
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    (Original post by Ilios_Lampros)
    Depends how old you are and whether you have a good sound knowledge of grammar- you should invest in that first.

    Next consider maintaining the languages once you've learned them. They will only stick if you use them regularly enough (especially with hanzi/kanji)- so only learn languages you are sure you'll use. For every person there is an optimum number of languages- a point where you can comfortably maintain them without any of them slipping. In this regard, I think you've chosen too many (unless you plan to work as a linguist the rest of your life).

    That said, the 3 romance languages should be easy as there are so many similarities. Once you get to your third you can reach an advanced level in 2 months easily. With mandarin AND japanese I think you've bitten off more than you can chew- I think you're underestimating the work involved. Indonesian, while gramatically simple, might not have many uses (depends entirely on you) so consider whether it is or isnt totally superfluous.

    Is it possible- Yes, but with provisos. By the time you're 25, yes, possibly provided you have the right methods and background knowledge of grammar. By the time you're 30, yes, provided you have the perseverence to stick it out!
    Thank you so much for your input. Unfortunately, I will be the judge of that. I have taught myself to a good level of Japanese when I was 12, and I know enough Mandarin to be able to survive linguistically in China (not very comfortably, mind you) ), so I don't think I've bitten off more than I can chew.

    Indonesian is very grammatically simple, despite the fact that it is an agglutinative language. I am now fluent in Indonesian having spoken nothing but Indonesian for the past two months (I am part-Indonesian, but I forgot it all when I was two). My biggest achievement was when I attended a party filled with Indonesians. I spoke nothing but Indonesian the entire night, yet no one batted an eyelid. In fact, I was a little disappointed -- I expected comments like "Wow, you have improved so much!", but it never came. Only then did it hit me that nobody realised I wasn't a native speaker of the language. I was so proud! I am actually considering learning Tagalog, since they are part of the same family tree ...

    Gotta brush up on my grammar though. Heard it gets quite nasty for Russian :holmes:

    With regards to age, I am still very, very young.
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    (Original post by MarcD)
    But yes, by no means are they languages to be taken lightly! Especially Mandarin, I still struggle with the tones -.-
    Contrary to popular belief, you will still be understood even if you get your tones mixed up. I do that all the time and it has never hindered conversation in any way (of course, the recipient has to spend an extra split-second correcting my tone). Learning tones are not very hard!
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    I am finding this very fascinating, considering Switzerland's sheer size (or lack thereof )

    If I were to travel to Switzerland one day, I would probably just stop by at Zürich and live there for a while. I heard the land is indescribably lovely, so that's a bonus!

    Montreal sounds like a great place for languages! I have also heard that Canadian French differs from the French from France. I do want to learn enough French to understand both, so which variant should I start with?
    I can understand both, and tbh it's not that much different. Maybe a bit more pronounced than the difference between American and British English, just a very different accent and varied vocab for the same thing. There are some minor differences with some elements of grammar, but if you are fluent in one, it's barely noticeable (in the same way that chav's talk Jafaican with different grammar to English, yet it's still comprehensible)

    If I had to recommend one, I'd advise you to learn Parisian French, since it's universally understood (plus if you learn French in Quebec, you'll have a Quebec accent, and people will judge/make assumptions about you just for this).
    Whereas Parisian French is kind of the equivelant to Recieved Pronunciation in Britain or General American in the U.S.
    It's free of any sort of stigma, and all that people will be able to tell is that you speak English(/French), and are from out of town.

    I personally have found this website to be very informative and helpful:
    http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/e/index.html
    It's nothing more than one guy's opinions on his experiences of becoming a polyglot, but his provides some very useful insights and explanations, as well as advice.
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    (Original post by Miss_Scarlet)
    I think you can become good or very good at languages, but becoming fluent takes longer and I think it helps if you spend time living in the country where the language is spoken. I don't think it is impossible to become fluent in so many, but try to be realistic with your goal else you may get tired of not achieving it in a short time. I'd begin with the other European languages...
    Oops, I have sort-of begun with the Asian ones ... :getmecoat:

    I am learning Spanish now though!
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    The dream: To be fluent in English, Spanish, Japanese, Mandarin, Russian, Indonesian, French, German & Portuguese (+ other languages if it goes well) before the age of 25~30.

    Thoughts anyone? Is it possible? Impossible? Go ahead, write all you wish. Don't forget to give your reasons! I always need more inspiration from both encouragement and discouragement to keep on going
    9 subjects, I don't know how old you are, but people often go on language crash courses which (whilst not covering the nuances of the language) get them competently fluent easily under a year. If you focus all your attention on learning these then it should be achievable with a good teacher - good luck!! :yes:
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    (Original post by MarcD)
    Ohh I get you, that's a good idea actually! Means you'll really be immersing yourself in the languages and keeping engaged

    There's a lot of similarity in our languages too, I wanna be fluent in:

    English, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Russian, Arabic, Korean, Mandarin & Tagalog/Cebuano (I've paired those in one as they're two different dialects of Filipino and pretty similar to each other).

    My main interests lie in the Asian languages though. Just got back from a 3 month trip around Asia actually and I've fallen in love with Asia even more now! Still haven't been to Japan yet though, ironic considering Japanese is what started my love for languages!!
    DUDE YOU MUST TRAVEL TO JAPAN RIGHT. THIS. INSTANT. Nothing is better than walking amidst the sakura blossoms in Osaka during springtime ...

    Learning Tagalog is a fantastic choice! It is incredibly annoying for me to listen to it though -- do you know the feeling? It's the sort of irritation you get when you know you're SUPPOSED to understand something, but you just don't. You see, as an Indonesian speaker Tagalog sounds come off as sounding very similar. It sounds a little like this to you. One day I will learn Tagalog to ease my frustration!
 
 
 
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