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    (Original post by Stella476)
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    I am sorry for the financial issues. I will be an international student studying in the UK soon, and I feel like I will rake up a similar mountain of debt as well. Maybe we'll dig up an oilfield or a gold mine somewhere, but our loans will be repaid one day!

    Ah, eres de los Estados Unidos? Algún día viajaré al país para conocer muchas personas americanas. También seguro que hay muchos paisajes bonitos en Norte America. :yes:

    ¡Muchas gracias por tu "advice"! Fue muy bueno. Vale, creo que necesito un diccionario de español ahora, porque en realidad hay muchas palabras que ya no entiendo. Aunque no me gustan los libres de gramatica española (son aburridos, no?), si es necesario para mejorar mi español, *dramatic sigh* I might get one, eventualmente.

    There are still many gaps in my conversational skills (sorry for the long reply, it took me a long time to regurgitate the accents). But hey, I'm always looking to improve it!
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    Fluency: "The features which give speech the qualities of being natural and normal, including native like use of PAUSING, rhythm, INTONATION, STRESS, rate of speaking, and use of interjections and interruptions".

    It is difficult to learn a SECOND language fluently if you start after the age of 5 and extremely difficult after the age of 14. The brain changes as we get older and abilities like language acquisition are locked away/lost. Learning further similar languages may be all right but learning two/three completely unrelated languages e.g. Spanish, Japanese and Mandarin would increase the difficulty exponentially.

    Assuming you're 18 that gives you 7-12 years to fit the above definition in 9 different languages. To be honest, unless you have a crazily abnormal knack for languages like that guy who learnt Icelandic in a week, I very much doubt it's possible. To be able to hold a basic conversation in each of those languages would be a more realistic goal in my opinion.
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    Do french, portugese then German first. I know English, Russian, Spanish fluently. I used to know french quite well. I know what the deal is :teeth:

    I dont know about the asian languages, korean is the simplest, so I dunno here (maybe change indonesian to Korean Im half korean)

    Are you trying to become an international interpreter at the UN or something? :awesome: Everyone told me to study to become one !

    I wish you the best of luck! If you want tips with Russian I can help!
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    (Original post by anongeek)
    Swiss German isn't the same as German.
    But both are mutually comprehensible, so it doesn't really matter.
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    (Original post by quadruple_twist)
    Fluency: "The features which give speech the qualities of being natural and normal, including native like use of PAUSING, rhythm, INTONATION, STRESS, rate of speaking, and use of interjections and interruptions".
    taken from www.dictionary.com (which I follow, by the way)

    flu·ent
    1. spoken or written with ease: fluent french.
    2. able to speak or write smoothly, easily, or readily: a fluent speaker; fluent in six languages.
    3. easy; graceful: fluent motion; fluent curves.

    Yep, I think this is more doable than what you have just described above. :yes:

    (Original post by quadruple_twist)
    It is difficult to learn a SECOND language fluently if you start after the age of 5 and extremely difficult after the age of 14. The brain changes as we get older and abilities like language acquisition are locked away/lost. Learning further similar languages may be all right but learning two/three completely unrelated languages e.g. Spanish, Japanese and Mandarin would increase the difficulty exponentially.
    This may be just me, but learning completely separate languages prove to be much simpler than learning related languages. For example, I can look at a book and think "book", "el libro", "buku", "ほん", "书", just as well as I can look at a cat and think "cat", "el gato", "kucing", "ねこ" and "猫" without safely mixing up any one of them. If I were to learn Portuguese, Italian, Spanish and French one after the other then I might get confused between them all. I think of my brain as a huge shelf with many drawers -- one language goes into one separate drawer. I haven't gotten confused yet! Never underestimate the extent of the human brain!

    (Original post by quadruple_twist)
    To be honest, unless you have a crazily abnormal knack for languages like that guy who learnt Icelandic in a week, I very much doubt it's possible.
    No, I don't have any above-average knack for languages, just the right mindset and the zeal to succeed. It is exactly your mentality that I want to disprove at all costs!
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    I want to be the one who assassinates david cameron as the country goes to hell after the cuts! I will be regarded as hero a modern day che
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    (Original post by cowsgoquack)
    a square circle is impossible. fact.
    ooft there's always one.
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    (Original post by yurihammo)
    Do french, portugese then German first. I know English, Russian, Spanish fluently. I used to know french quite well. I know what the deal is :teeth:

    I dont know about the asian languages, korean is the simplest, so I dunno here (maybe change indonesian to Korean Im half korean)

    Are you trying to become an international interpreter at the UN or something? :awesome: Everyone told me to study to become one !

    I wish you the best of luck! If you want tips with Russian I can help!
    Hey, that's not fair! You're halfway through MY journey Korean is not the simplest, although I love their characters! Similarly, I'm half-Indonesian, so naturally I'm going to find Indonesian easier than Korean! Before I begin Korean I must get myself in the right mindset first!

    Is there even any distinguishable difference between "Ш" and "Щ"? I've listened to the recording fifteen times and I can't tell, aside from a slight intonation change! :rant:

    EDIT: I do want to work for such an inter-governmental organisation one day, but I've never imagined myself working in the line of translating/interpreting! Hmm .. maybe I should rethink
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    (Original post by spike1707)
    ooft there's always one.
    The unfortunate cynic. :sadnod:
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    (Original post by Left Hand Drive)
    I want to be the one who assassinates david cameron as the country goes to hell after the cuts! I will be regarded as hero a modern day che
    You do that, I dare ya.
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    It's not impossible to do those, especially if you work hard to achieve it. Goodluck!
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    (Original post by dotty_but_good)
    Good luck with that, I am currently trying to improve my french for I shall be living in France for 6 months this year, but it will be a struggle as I am really a scientist not a linguist.
    IMPOSSIBLE :rant: That kind of mentality hinders your language learning! (Although being a scientist is pretty damn admirable)

    (Original post by EDCE88)
    How do you plan to do this? As in lessons with a tutor? books? software etc..
    I plan on learning it by first listening to music, watching movies + tv shows until I get a basic feel of the language. After that, I will search for native penpals and/or skype buddies to practice what I have learnt. Once I get the opportunity, I will travel to that country for an extended stay to improve it further. I don't trust tutors, and I want to take charge of my own learning!

    (Original post by Lewk)
    would help if you told us how old you actually are in the OP, and how much you've learnt already
    Sorry, didn't read this last night :facepalm:

    I speak fluent Indonesian and English + Bangka, which is creolised Hakka, self-learnt Japanese to a conversational level for a year when I was twelve, and I speak conversational Mandarin. A month ago, I started learning Spanish through skyping natives online, and am writing to Spanish penpals with what little Spanish I know. I'd love to pick up Japanese again once I'm satisfied with my Spanish, though.

    (Original post by ilickbatteries)
    Do it. I can't wait for you to reply 'no pics' to me in Portuguese on TSR
    Wait till I think of a smartass reply to that in five hundred languages!

    (Original post by jit987)
    Will you be able to maintain it?
    If I make friends :yes:

    (Original post by studyload)
    It's not impossible to do those, especially if you work hard to achieve it. Goodluck!
    :hugs:
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    I think this is perhaps a silly idea.

    The problem is that in so many of the languages you've listed, there's a huge difference between "being able to get by" and "being fluent".

    My experience comes entirely from Mandarin. I know stacks of people who claim to be 'fluent', but the difference between them is huge.

    Some genuinely are fluent - they can read and write, speak idiomatically in the language, pronounce correctly, and so on. Most, however, sound more like Borat does in English...if that. Yes, the Chinese can understand what they're saying, and yes, they can impress their friends with it. But to anyone with an ear for the language, what they're saying is garbled and a mess and simply comedy to the locals. They wouldn't be able to 'hang out' with Chinese for any period of time and be accepted as one of them, any more than Borat would when he's dallying around with Brits and Americans.

    In short, I think your strategy will at best leave you with this broken level of fluency in most of your languages. You'll be able to grasp something of all of the languages, but you'll be spreading yourself so thin that it'll actually leave you unable to really get into any of them at a deep level.

    In the timeframe you're talking about, I would specialize a little more if you want to get success. A couple of obvious strategies:

    1. Try and master the Latin languages - Spanish, Portuguese, possibly French as well.

    2. Go live in Asia and try to gain mastery of one of the languages (e.g. Mandarin) while getting reasonable fluency in another (e.g. Japanese).

    A really good strategy would be to aim for fluency in Mandarin, then try and get some progress in other Chinese dialects - Shanghainese, Cantonese, etc. This would really give you good prospects and ability to get round the Middle Kingdom, while at the same time remaining possible within the timeframe you're looking at.

    As you can see, I'm not saying you need to focus on one language alone, but your current mix is ludicrous and completely impossible to all but the language savant by 25 or even 30.

    In short: you need to get focused now, or you'll end up in a muddle further down the line.
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    :smug: just checking what that emote looks like
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    Also, for the guy who said Korean is the easiest Asian language, think again. It's easier than Mandarin and Japanese, or so I've heard. But it's a lot harder than Indonesian or Malay, which both strike me as pretty easy.
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    Hey, that's not fair! You're halfway through MY journey Korean is not the simplest, although I love their characters! Similarly, I'm half-Indonesian, so naturally I'm going to find Indonesian easier than Korean! Before I begin Korean I must get myself in the right mindset first!

    Is there even any distinguishable difference between "Ш" and "Щ"? I've listened to the recording fifteen times and I can't tell, aside from a slight intonation change! :rant:

    EDIT: I do want to work for such an inter-governmental organisation one day, but I've never imagined myself working in the line of translating/interpreting! Hmm .. maybe I should rethink

    "Ш" - "hard" sound - like in the word SHaman.
    "Щ" - softer sound - like in the word SHeer.

    They are really similar but you will need to get used to the writing of them (putting "И" instead of "Ы" ) Rather than pronounciation Youll get the hang of it!!
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
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    Thank you for your well-articulated reply! Very sound advice too, except I ain't listening to none of it :eviltongue:

    Just kidding.

    You may be right. I am aware that my dream sounds and looks ridiculous, but I shall be the final judge of that; once I reach the age of 25 I will review exactly how far I have gone in these languages.

    I understand where you're coming from with Mandarin. Fortunately, I live in a country where Mandarin is spoken on a daily basis, so I am able to distinguish between the "truly-fluent" and the "non-fluent". What is unfortunate, however, is that in my current circumstances it is impossible to live in a "full" immersion environment, so I cannot practise my Mandarin! One day, I will go to Beijing and master the language.

    My proposed strategy differs from yours though. I think that with my current opportunities, it will be easier to better my skills in Asian languages. However, I will be relocating to England in January next year, so perhaps there I can practise Romance-based languages.

    I beg to differ, though. I think that it is entirely possible to speak all those languages fluently (even though the age limit may seem a little strange), and I will, of course, be focusing on one language at a time, not the entire batch at once!
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    Also, for the guy who said Korean is the easiest Asian language, think again. It's easier than Mandarin and Japanese, or so I've heard. But it's a lot harder than Indonesian or Malay, which both strike me as pretty easy.
    Grammatically, yes, it is easy :yes: However, because of it's simplicity, context becomes important. A simple phrase such as "Jangan kelamaan" can be anything from "Do whatever you like, but make sure you don't come back too late" to "You'd better be home on time or else..!" or even "Don't take too long!" depending on how it is spoken what the person's facial expression reflects. Also, by inserting colloquial terms such as "sih", "nih", "dong", it changes the entire meaning of the sentence in ways that I can't even explain using English words :sad: There is also a huge distinguish between formal and informal Indonesian, and I'd even say that they should be considered different languages altogether! It doesn't exist in any other language I've experienced before because nobody mutilates their language on a daily basis like the Indonesians do.

    When they type like "Pa KbR dddx????" it makes you go :lolwut: is that even a language?!

    Indonesians speak faster than Malays, who in turn speak faster than Koreans, so speed is a factor.

    I'm still wondering what on earth the "easiest" Asian language is, because Indonesian/Malay definitely isn't it!
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    The dream: To be fluent in English, Spanish, Japanese, Mandarin, Russian, Indonesian, French, German & Portuguese (+ other languages if it goes well) before the age of 25~30.

    Thoughts anyone? Is it possible? Impossible? Go ahead, write all you wish. Don't forget to give your reasons! I always need more inspiration from both encouragement and discouragement to keep on going
    Nothing is impossible, but to learn so many languages will be a hell of a lot of work.

    You will need to do nothing else but study and live in these countries to learn the language fluently. I don't think you can really understand a language until you've lived in the country and experienced the culture.
 
 
 
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