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    (Original post by yurihammo)
    "Ш" - "hard" sound - like in the word SHaman.
    "Щ" - softer sound - like in the word SHeer.

    They are really similar but you will need to get used to the writing of them (putting "И" instead of "Ы" ) Rather than pronounciation Youll get the hang of it!!
    Imma need audio clips :sad: Don't worry about it though! I plan on taking up Russian someday, but I want to focus on the language I have on my plate now (ie. Spanish)

    Thanks so much for your help :hugs:
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    (Original post by shadow99)
    Nothing is impossible, but to learn so many languages will be a hell of a lot of work.

    You will need to do nothing else but study and live in these countries to learn the language fluently. I don't think you can really understand a language until you've lived in the country and experienced the culture.
    To the bolded part started above: I will think of something, don't you worry!

    You are absolutely right, though. I can say it goes both ways. You can not understand a country's culture without first experiencing their language!
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    What a dream to have!
    Well at least it's attainable if you try hard enough :p:
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    (Original post by Peachesishere)
    What a dream to have!
    Well at least it's attainable if you try hard enough :p:
    You, my friend, deserve a hug for that. So here :hugs:
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    Grammatically, yes, it is easy :yes: However, because of it's simplicity, context becomes important. A simple phrase such as "Jangan kelamaan" can be anything from "Do whatever you like, but make sure you don't come back too late" to "You'd better be home on time or else..!" or even "Don't take too long!" depending on how it is spoken what the person's facial expression reflects. Also, by inserting colloquial terms such as "sih", "nih", "dong", it changes the entire meaning of the sentence in ways that I can't even explain using English words :sad: There is also a huge distinguish between formal and informal Indonesian, and I'd even say that they should be considered different languages altogether! It doesn't exist in any other language I've experienced before because nobody mutilates their language on a daily basis like the Indonesians do.

    When they type like "Pa KbR dddx????" it makes you go :lolwut: is that even a language?!

    Indonesians speak faster than Malays, who in turn speak faster than Koreans, so speed is a factor.

    I'm still wondering what on earth the "easiest" Asian language is, because Indonesian/Malay definitely isn't it!
    I don't think this makes it any harder than most other Asian languages, though. Chinese has all of these difficulties, including the differences between formal and informal language. In addition, it has:

    - ********* more words
    - way, way harder pronunciation
    - tones
    - a writing system almost set up to make things impossible for the learner
    - huge regional variations

    Indonesian is easy to pronounce, phonetically written, and generally far easier than Mandarin/Korean/Japanese. That's why it's a great language to learn, in my view.

    As for the easiest Asian language, it depends how specific you want to get. There are hundreds of languages in Asia and no doubt one or two are very easy, but out of the major languages I'd say Indonesian/Malay are among the easiest to get to grips with.
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    - ********* more words
    - way, way harder pronunciation
    - tones
    - a writing system almost set up to make things impossible for the learner
    - huge regional variations


    Indonesian is easy to pronounce, phonetically written, and generally far easier than Mandarin/Korean/Japanese. That's why it's a great language to learn, in my view.
    Tsk tsk tsk. Don't worry about those! They're easy once you learn all of them! Especially point #3. It ain't much harder than writing 'c-a-t' in English. When I started Mandarin, I never looked for those signs, and so I never found it hard. When you speak Mandarin fast the tones almost disappear anyway, which makes me wonder why on earth they are even there in the first place.

    Hmm ... you may be right. I think the only barrier to learning Indonesian is the speed of the language. If I can videotape my friends speaking, I'll PM you and you'll see exactly why!
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    Tsk tsk tsk. Don't worry about those! They're easy once you learn all of them! Especially point #3. It ain't much harder than writing 'c-a-t' in English. When I started Mandarin, I never looked for those signs, and so I never found it hard. When you speak Mandarin fast the tones almost disappear anyway, which makes me wonder why on earth they are even there in the first place.

    Hmm ... you may be right. I think the only barrier to learning Indonesian is the speed of the language. If I can videotape my friends speaking, I'll PM you and you'll see exactly why!
    True about the speed, but again the same applies in many languages. I've never known Indonesians to be a sort for unnaturally motoring through their sentences (I could be wrong, of course).

    I'm somewhat baffled by your comments on Mandarin, however. The writing system is one of the hardest in the world. You need to memorize all of the characters, and then parse them accurately since the Chinese don't put gaps between the words (you don't know if it's two two-syllable words or four one-syllable words, on first glance).

    I have studied Mandarin for a few years now, and I can still comprehend a French newspaper quicker than a Chinese one. I have never studied a day of French in my life.

    As for the tones, they do not disappear at fast speed unless the context is extremely clear. Sometimes it is, but not always. One of my friends who's not bad at Mandarin recently found himself in a pharmacy asking for a blowjob, precisely because of poor attention to tones. Go figure.

    This is why I think you'll face trouble. It's easy to sweep issues like these under the carpet as a beginner, but once you're out there trying to become fluent it really stalls your progress. Plenty of people live in China for 3 years and still don't master the spoken language, let alone the written. And that's just ONE of your target languages!
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    (Original post by DJ_Black)
    But both are mutually comprehensible, so it doesn't really matter.
    No they're not, spoken Swiss German is mutually unintelligible with standard German.
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    I figured as much. But Austrian German isn't the same as German German, but I'd expect all to be mutually intelligible!
    Austrian German is to German as say Geordie English is to English, a native speaker can probably figure it out with concentration, but anyone else will likely struggle. Spoken Swiss german (written it's closer to standard German) is different enough that it's practically a different language, swiss german TV shows shown in Germany will be dubbed or subtitled.

    Most swiss german speakers will understand standard german as well as it's taught in schools, but it's distinct from swiss german.
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    You do that, I dare ya.

    Now I have a leg to stand on when I go to court
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    Whatever makes you happy
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    True about the speed, but again the same applies in many languages. I've never known Indonesians to be a sort for unnaturally motoring through their sentences (I could be wrong, of course).
    I'll give you a laugh with this one ... wait till I take the video!

    (Original post by Bramlow)
    I'm somewhat baffled by your comments on Mandarin, however. The writing system is one of the hardest in the world. You need to memorize all of the characters, and then parse them accurately since the Chinese don't put gaps between the words (you don't know if it's two two-syllable words or four one-syllable words, on first glance).
    I know I'm no linguistics major, and my method of learning may be unorthodox (or just waiting to be proven wrong by someone else), but I have a trick to learning Chinese characters. I actually liken it to learning English. People insist that Chinese has no alphabet -- however, to me, Chinese DOES have an alphabet. What I consider the "alphabet" are Chinese strokes. A simple word such as "漢字" are made up of little strokes, which are as easy (or dare I say it? Even easier than) as English letters. I had an epiphany -- By breaking down each individual character into their respective "letters", how different is that from stringing together "c-a-t" to form cat? With the sound, of course, it will have to be learnt, or acquired. What I do with these is not through memorisation -- it's true blurred association. I vaguely remember how a word is shaped, and I associate it with the sound in question. Sort of how you vaguely look at a the square edges of a cuboid and your brain automatically thinks "box". Actually writing will come later -- and easier than you think. I look at the character 本 and my brain automatically thinks "ben", because it vaguely recognises how the character is shaped.

    I just noticed that that would not have made any sense to anyone else other than me :facepalm:

    Another theory is because I'm part-Chinese and it may be a genetic thing. However, that is 1000000% impossible, so that theory should be ditched, stomped and burnt to ashes

    (Original post by Bramlow)
    As for the tones, they do not disappear at fast speed unless the context is extremely clear. Sometimes it is, but not always. One of my friends who's not bad at Mandarin recently found himself in a pharmacy asking for a blowjob, precisely because of poor attention to tones. Go figure.
    I'm sorry, I just LOL'ed pretty loudly. I've made such mistakes too, although it has never hindered my conversation. :yes: I'm pretty sure I told this one disgusting guy I wanted to kiss him once, tsk. Tones will come naturally after a while. Also, in Malaysia, the tones are very easy to pick up, AND they have a very nice and clear accent. What more can a foreign language speaker want?
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    (Original post by anongeek)
    Austrian German is to German as say Geordie English is to English, a native speaker can probably figure it out with concentration, but anyone else will likely struggle. Spoken Swiss german (written it's closer to standard German) is different enough that it's practically a different language, swiss german TV shows shown in Germany will be dubbed or subtitled.

    Most swiss german speakers will understand standard german as well as it's taught in schools, but it's distinct from swiss german.
    Thanks for the clarification! I know nothing about German (yet) so I guess my baseless assumptions must be corrected!

    Swiss german compared to standard German sounds a lot like Malay compared to Indonesian. Everyone assumes that they are mutually intelligible (they are, to an extent) but one must not forget why they are thought of as two languages. :yes:
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    (Original post by doodle7)
    Dreams are never impossible if you're willing to work for them Good luck, it's definitely doable!
    I agree
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    No it won't, but I'm prepared to have fun with it as I work on it. I will focus on the "fun" side of language-learning ie. talking to natives, rather than poring over grammar books.

    And I'm very, very young, so there is still plenty of life in me yet!
    Good luck then if you need help with french just PM me I'm fluent in french.
 
 
 
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