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You're a bus driver. It's 12.05am. Passenger has day-to-go valid until 12. Do you... watch

  • View Poll Results: Would you let the passenger off even though their bus ticket is invalid by 5 mins?
    Yes
    86.21%
    No
    13.79%

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    As much as refusing to let them on would annoy me if they seemed genuinely sorry, I would have to decline on the basis that they could be a company spy.
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    I'd let them off, some people become too power happy when they are in authority and they forget to use their own discretion
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    Yeah, why not? They're not trying to get a whole extra day of use out of the ticket and they're just getting home a bit later than usual. It doesn't exactly set a dangerous precedent.
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    I thought they last until the last bus?
    So you buy a ticket during the day, and it is valid until when the buses stop running.
    It is certainly the case with the buses in Bath (finish at around 3am), and I think its the same with the trains too.

    (Original post by Ewan)
    Anyway, I would just walk on, bus drivers can't do squat anyway...
    Yes they can. I've been on a bus where the driver has refused to leave the stop until a person either paid or got off.
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    Just goes to show that 88% of people on TSR are tree hugging, asylum seeker welcoming, beardy weirdy, Daily Mail-hating, wishy washy liberals - who believe in the 'ancient British tradition' of tolerance and fair mindedness of course.
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    (Original post by Fusion)
    I remember when it was easy to alter the dates on travelcards with a pen to fool bus drivers.
    I did that before, can't remember how it happened exactly but as far as I can remember I'd doctored my travelcard to the day before, but had to go in for an exam the next day and forgot about needing to get a new one or something. Got on the bus with it but got inspected and taken off and fined the standard "out of date pass" amount. Silly woman never noticed that I'd doctored it!
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    I imagine a bus driver's life is full of aggro and very little satisfaction. Therefore winding up students with invalid tickets would probably be the highlight of their day. I would refuse :awesome:
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    So it's fine to break rules, but not laws? Why does anyone bother then? Why do we try to run an orderly society so we don't descend into anarchy and we just do what we want? Imagine life if we all pushed into queues because we're in a hurry, or parked in disabled parking bays because they're closer to the shop, or took up the whole pavement whilst riding our bikes three abreast.

    But it's fine to do that, because they're not laws!
    Different rules & laws within a society are naturally and politcally grades, even if not officially. A great example of this is murder and stealing a potato from a market stall.

    Both crimes are breaking the law, do they get the same punishment? Do you give life imprisonment to the guy stealing the potato from the market? Of course not! The most would be a fine, to put someone in jail for stealing a potato would cost more then its worth, and its just blantly stupid.

    Secondly, someone commits murder, do you just give them a slap on the wrist? Of course not! Each crime (or in this case, breaking the rules) is treated individually with something some of us humans lack, COMMON SENSE.

    If someone break a rule such as "stealing" £100,000 from a company (although they might be doing it legally so in the law its not stealing but Mr bob the CEO doesn't see it that way), then its treated more sever then someone letting a bus ticket slide by 5 minutes.

    To be honest, its a total matter of common sense, logic and just human decency when thinking about rule breaking. You have to apply logic to every situation because non can be treated the same, even high cases in law via murder cannot be treated the same, hence why the punishment changes in terms of jail time and what not.

    Also, there is no line to draw, because often the line is too far merged that its indistinguishable, so that phase is kinda out dated (its like drawing a line between rich a poor.... You say okay everyone one earning over 100,000 a year is rich! What about Miss Jane Doh who is earning 99,000 a year? Does that make her poor? Of course not, you have to apply LOGIC to each situation)


    BTW I would let it slide prolonged as they where a nice individual, if they demanded it was there right to get on the bug, I'd say bugger off and learn some manners.


    My 2 cent,
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    So it's fine to break rules, but not laws? Why does anyone bother then? Why do we try to run an orderly society so we don't descend into anarchy and we just do what we want? Imagine life if we all pushed into queues because we're in a hurry, or parked in disabled parking bays because they're closer to the shop, or took up the whole pavement whilst riding our bikes three abreast.

    But it's fine to do that, because they're not laws!
    Come on Sown, you're confusing a minor act of kindness with mass public disorder.
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    I would definitely let them off. It's only five minutes.
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    No i'm not a bus driver, i'm a student.
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    (Original post by James Carter)
    If he/she was polite and seemed like an okay person I would yeah.

    Oh but I'm a bus driver, so 90% of the time I'm a rude, pretentious, dastardly scoundrel.
    I know a lot of bus drivers. They're all very nice people. Nobody remembers the nice bus drivers who let you on if your pass is just out of date, or the bus has already left the stop and picks you up, or waits for your mam/gran who is walking to the bus stop when the bus pulls up. Everyone just remembers the minority of bus drivers who are *********. You get ********* in every job, man.
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    id let them off everytime, no one will know, if anyone asks. i'll say "oh my watch must be slow"
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    Let them off. Ffs it would be so harsh if I didn't.
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    I'd pretend I wasn't going to, have a huge argument with the passenger, just for the laughs, then pull away, decide to stop and then let them on anyway..
    I'm a *****.
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    I'm a bus driver...

    *shoots self*
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    (Original post by micky022)
    Come on Sown, you're confusing a minor act of kindness with mass public disorder.
    exactly
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    (Original post by River85)
    Erm, the bus driver wouldn't break the "law" if he allowed the passenger to continue. He wouldn't be commiting some illegal act. It's only the terms and conditions set by the bus company. He might get in trouble with the company if found out but wouldn't be a major disciplinary offence.

    Would entirely depend on who the passenger was, the area they were travelling in their age and gender and whether travelling alone. But in most cases I wouldn't accept it. Unless the bus was supposed to arrive before 12 but I was running late, of course.

    Rules is rules I'm afraid.

    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    But where do you draw the line? The laws and rules exist so we don't have to decide what is acceptable, and what is not.

    I thought this quote by Douglas Bader, British WWII air ace, seemed pretty appropriate as a response to you two, and this thread in general:

    "Rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men."
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    (Original post by JmJtr)
    GOD I HATE PEOPLE LIKE YOU! Sort of person that can spoil a persons wholeee day, just to follow stupid rules made by monkeys who want to become richer and richer.
    Wow. Thanks for attempting to judge me, and my entire personality, on the basis on one post on the internets.

    You don't know me. I have my faults, as we all do, but will always try my best to help someone and make allowances.

    However, you do have to draw a line somwhere.

    How is a bus driver supposed to know it was a genuine mistake or this person was late just out of lazyness?

    They will get people like this every single day of the week. If the driver kept allowing customers to use the bus, even without a valid ticket, then they will most likely lose their job.

    You are a bus driver. Say you have few formal qualifications and a family to support. Is it worth losing your job, or facing other disciplinary action, because of this?

    Finally, public transport often isn't particularly well funded and can operate with a loss. These rules and fares aren't here to "make people richer" but to actually adequately fund public transport and keep services working. Not to make Chief Execs rich.

    (Original post by OMG TOOTHBRUSH)
    I thought this quote by Douglas Bader, British WWII air ace, seemed pretty appropriate as a response to you two, and this thread in general:

    "Rules are for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men."
    Hmmmm. See above. Quoting people in that manner does come across as quite pretentious though, I also did make it clear that whether or not I accept the customer would depend on the circumstances so it's not just blind obedience to a rule.
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by Picnic1)
    Just goes to show that 88% of people on TSR are tree hugging, asylum seeker welcoming, beardy weirdy, Daily Mail-hating, wishy washy liberals - who believe in the 'ancient British tradition' of tolerance and fair mindedness of course.
    :rofl:

    Interesting replies and an interesting poll.

    Keep it coming.
 
 
 
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