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Classical Composers: Who is your favourite? watch

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    (Original post by kurovalte)
    i know many will disagree but Beethoven drives me mad, i find it so dull and repetitive, on the other hand Chopin, i think, is pure genius and his pieces are really amazing to play and Rachmanninov is really fun as well
    OH take that back about Beethoven

    Chopin is very beautiful, but I think, overplayed and some people completely mangle his pieces. Rachmaninov is splendiferous.
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    (Original post by j.alexanderh)
    My three reasons
    Very Nice Also I forgot this!?!



    Im also partial to Granados, Mozart, Chopin (yep I like chopin and Bach ) and Barber. I think this pretty much sums up my top favourites!







    Love it...who needs dubstep!
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    (Original post by Haeron)
    That is beautiful. I like the Cantata - I forget which number, it is the one with the soprano and alto aria "wir eilen..." etc. and the tenor and bass arias with the false starts?
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    (Original post by Haeron)
    You'd hate Andras Schiff!
    Haha, he still retains more visceral parts than Barenboim though so I don't mind him. But yeah, there are far more pianists I'd rather listen to. I'm guessing you've heard his Beethoven sonata lectures from the Guardian? I thought they were worth a listen, at least.
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    Well it is sort of dreamy romanticism versus technicality is it not? In the layman's view at least.

    I object to your Nazism. Beethoven is a husband of mine, and he and I are greatly attached. (It is sort of an incestuous marriage, but hey :cool:)

    Beethoven over Bach! :dancing:
    I do love the technicality of Bach, but as a cliched example the chords that close T+F in d minor are pure catharsis.
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    That is beautiful. I like the Cantata - I forget which number, it is the one with the soprano and alto aria "wir eilen..." etc. and the tenor and bass arias with the false starts?
    It's the Easter Oratorio. There's accomagnato recitatives and recitatives which develop into accompagnato, if that's what you mean. Arias for S, T and A. Poor B!
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    (Original post by Just-Some-Guy)

    Love it...who needs dubstep!
    ... What is dubstep?

    (Original post by Ideot)
    Ooh good one. I played the third movement but ballsed up on the staccato bit
    Aww. You don't seem to like staccato, do you?
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    (Original post by Maths_Lover)
    ... What is dubstep?



    Aww. You don't seem to like staccato, do you?
    Gershwin is really good too. :P
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    I really like Philip Glass lately, especially his song Closing from the Glassworks album.
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    Haha, he still retains more visceral parts than Barenboim though so I don't mind him. But yeah, there are far more pianists I'd rather listen to. I'm guessing you've heard his Beethoven sonata lectures from the Guardian? I thought they were worth a listen, at least.
    I love his playing. Total agogic freedom, whilst never losing the sense of forward motion. I actually have those lectures on my iPod...
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    Ooh good one. I played the third movement but ballsed up on the staccato bit

    Ah I think Barenboim is one of the best interpreters of Beethoven perhaps - though it could do with a little bit more passion definitely. Which interpretation would you recommend?
    As a first set to familiarise, probably Kempff, Arrau or Ashkenazy. If you like Barenboim, maybe Brendel and Schiff.

    If I had to pick one set... either Schnabel or Backhaus.

    Also can never go wrong with Gilels and Richter (they didn't record complete sets though). I like Gulda's Beethoven too.


    Sorry, couldn't suggest one without suggesting more
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    Rachmaninoff is undoubtedly beautiful, to play as well as to listen to, and I think that if you listen and enjoy his music, a natural development in terms of who you enjoy listening to is Chopin. Well ahead of his time, his music is just sublime and gorgeous.
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    (Original post by Articaaa)
    Gershwin is really good too. :P
    OK. ^.^

    You didn't answer my question, though.

    I shall just have to Google it, then. :hmmm:
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    (Original post by Maths_Lover)
    ... What is dubstep?



    Aww. You don't seem to like staccato, do you?
    Staccato is fine *chuckles* it's just I become paralysed with fear playing in front of crowds, unless I'm a background music person in a pub

    Staccato + cold and sweaty hands = fail
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    As a first set to familiarise, probably Kempff, Arrau or Ashkenazy. If you like Barenboim, maybe Brendel and Schiff.

    If I had to pick one set... either Schnabel or Backhaus.

    Also can never go wrong with Gilels and Richter (they didn't record complete sets though). I like Gulda's Beethoven too.


    Sorry, couldn't suggest one without suggesting more
    Thank you!
    *gambols along to youtube*

    Crap, I should be studying.
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    (Original post by Maths_Lover)
    ... What is dubstep?



    Aww. You don't seem to like staccato, do you?
    Hah! Dub step: Where people pick a song, speed it up slightly, press a generic "drums" button on a computer, turn the bass up ridiculously and call it music..
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    I do love the technicality of Bach, but as a cliched example the chords that close T+F in d minor are pure catharsis.
    AHH I also have a thing for his closing chords - in almost any piece actually. I did a Bach piece a while ago, his Fugue in D major, the ending is absolutely AMAZING. I also like the Tierce de Picardies which float around in his Cantatas.

    Edit: found an example of the piece here. The guy playing it isn't that great. But just listen to the ending :woo:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VF32ydHo1Es
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    Staccato is fine *chuckles* it's just I become paralysed with fear playing in front of crowds, unless I'm a background music person in a pub

    Staccato + cold and sweaty hands = fail
    I know what you mean! It's always the staccato pieces I mess up in exams! No matter how well I know them, I usually get a lower mark for them as I mess up. :/

    (Original post by Just-Some-Guy)
    Hah! Dub step: Where people pick a song, speed it up slightly, press a generic "drums" button on a computer, turn the bass up ridiculously and call it music..
    Ah...

    In that case... bleurgh...
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    AHH I also have a thing for his closing chords - in almost any piece actually. I did a Bach piece a while ago, his Fugue in D major, the ending is absolutely AMAZING. I also like the Tierce de Picardies which float around in his Cantatas.

    Edit: found an example of the piece here. The guy playing it isn't that great. But just listen to the ending :woo:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VF32ydHo1Es
    So satisfying. I really like the Goldberg variations too, the Glenn Gould recording are amazing. The Aria makes everything better...
 
 
 
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