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    Right this thread is going to reveal a lot about myself. Basically its going to show how ignorant and stupid I am. Basically I studied English combined for a year at AS level, didn't revise and had poor attendance so I obviously failed.

    Anyway I am thinking of taking the subject up again but this time I only want to take up one (not combined) However I'm not sure which subject it which.

    I want to do more written stuff and I always thought that Lit' was more written work and Language was more analysing speech etc.... However a friend told me that this was wrong and that the opposite was true. So was I right or was my friend? Is English Lireature was all about creative writing and not analysing texts and speech.
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    (Original post by spaceman5000)
    Right this thread is going to reveal a lot about myself. Basically its going to show how ignorant and stupid I am. Basically I studied English combined for a year at AS level, didn't revise and had poor attendance so I obviously failed.

    Anyway I am thinking of taking the subject up again but this time I only want to take up one (not combined) However I'm not sure which subject it which.

    I want to do more written stuff and I always thought that Lit' was more written work and Language was more analysing speech etc.... However a friend told me that this was wrong and that the opposite was true. So was I right or was my friend? Is English Lireature was all about creative writing and not analysing texts and speech.
    There is no creative writing in English Literature. It's analysing texts i.e. poetry, novels, plays etc. There is a lot of writing, but it's not creative; largely essays on the texts you study.

    Source: me, having done English Lit AS and A2.
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    (Original post by rylit91)
    There is no creative writing in English Literature. It's analysing texts i.e. poetry, novels, plays etc. There is a lot of writing, but it's not creative; largely essays on the texts you study.

    Source: me, having done English Lit AS and A2.
    So what about English Language?
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    Hmmm in this case it sounds as if your friend was right. Sorry to disappoint But for the note, Literature is more highly regarded than Language... But its up to you as to what you prefer at the end of the day...
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    (Original post by spaceman5000)
    So what about English Language?
    Language is more 'creative' if you like. Look at the spec for Language course you'll be doing... Which exam board is it?
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    (Original post by spaceman5000)
    So what about English Language?
    Don't know, I didn't do it, but it's likely I'll be doing it during my Gap Year. I assume it's more geared towards studying the development of English as a Language. Therefore, perhaps studying Chaucer, Anglo-Saxon stuff etc. But I should suppose there would be a fair amount of creative writing as in GCSE English Lang.

    One note to make, however, is that English Lang doesn't hold as much 'weight' at University. One more thing, is that a peer of mine studied English Lit and is now at Bath Spa studying creative writing.
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    (Original post by rylit91)
    Don't know, I didn't do it, but it's likely I'll be doing it during my Gap Year. I assume it's more geared towards studying the development of English as a Language. Therefore, perhaps studying Chaucer, Anglo-Saxon stuff etc. But I should suppose there would be a fair amount of creative writing as in GCSE English Lang.

    One note to make, however, is that English Lang doesn't hold as much 'weight' at University. One more thing, is that a peer of mine studied English Lit and is now at Bath Spa studying creative writing.

    I'd me more than willing to do Eng Lit, the thing is Im just very aprehensive because I failed it last time. The problem I had was that I didn't know all the different terms. So when analysing an interview that Richard and Judy had with JK Rowling I didn't have the terms to use.

    Obviously if I had revised I could do better, Do you have any tips?
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    (Original post by spaceman5000)
    I'd me more than willing to do Eng Lit, the thing is Im just very aprehensive because I failed it last time. The problem I had was that I didn't know all the different terms. So when analysing an interview that Richard and Judy had with JK Rowling I didn't have the terms to use.

    Obviously if I had revised I could do better, Do you have any tips?
    mmm, it's difficult to give tips. You wouldn't, however, be analysing interviews of authors. You won't even necessarily be studying authors. More different genres of texts. For instance in my AS year, I studied Enduring Love (Ian McEwan) The Crucible and Death of a Salesman (Miller) A Handful of Dust (Waugh) and Wilfred Owen's Poems. So in my course we studied a range of plays, poetry and novels from modern to [if we chose] Chaucer.

    I think your 'poor attendance' may be a cause of your 'failing'. I missed two lessons in a row once and was called in to my teachers' office to be questioned as to why I was, "Never in."

    The biggest tip I can give you, and it may sound like a bloody obvious one, is to read the texts first time round, and learn them first time round. Don't be nonchalant and procrastinate and think, 'I've got all the time in the world.' I learnt this the hard way. Reading the whole text once is a must; reading it twice, or thrice is a very good idea. If you want to know anything else, just pm me, or post on here
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    Yup, I would agree

    My revision technique for english lit would be to read the texts a few times each and make sure you understand them. Maybe annotate them the first time you read them, so concentrating on key features and themes. When you read over it again, read your annotations with the text so they stick in your memory. I generally research and read other people's interpretations and write them down too, off the internet or something. Find some blank versions of the text you are reading (especially with poems) and try to annotate them without looking at your notes to make sure you know them. Then the big thing for me is to do practise questions, and maybe get your teacher to mark a few. This way you get used to thinking fast and planning and knowing what the examiner is looking for. You won't be surprised at the types of questions you get in the exam then

    For language i find online quizzes and whatever i can to test myself on key terms. Maybe you could read a newspaper and annotate the key terms and what effect they create?

    This has always worked for me anyways :P any other questions I'd be pleased to help
 
 
 
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