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    Hi, some advise needed urgently please!

    I have only just been informed (a week before my course starts) that I am 'not eligible' for a tuition fee loan, as I am resitting my second year, and I already had to resit my first year. Before prejudging as 'University not for you' etc, please just know that the past couple of years have been crazy for me, outside of university, and that the work has unfortunately played second-fiddle a lot of the time. Now, just as things have sorted themselves out there seems to be more spanners in the works!

    In basic, I did a foundation year 'Computing Foundation', before going onto an 'Accounting and Finance' degree course. Firstly they say this counts as an extra year as I transferred ti a different course, whereas I actually completed the course and went on to the degree, which I needed in order to move onto it. The fees for this year were a reduced £1200. I then did my first year, and had a resit, I was completely unable to attend. I then had to redo the whole year again just to do the resit (it was a core module so had to be done before progressing). Due to it only being one exam I was charged no tuition fees for this.

    Now my first actual resit of a year I am told that I am not entitled to a tuition fee loan as it is not my first resit. But I have not been funded for any extra tuition fees. Anyone that can provide any help on this, it would be very, very much appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!
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    Whether a year at uni was funded or not is irrelevant in determining your years of entitlement to funding.
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    That seems... extremely illogical/unfair?
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    It's correct. For that foundation year not to count, it would've had to have been an integral part of the accounting course. It's not, and therefore counts as your +1 year for funding. You've no entitlement to fee support for the repeat, in accordance with Regulation 22 of The Student Support Regulations 2009
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    Just get a job. Take a gap year if you need to- but seriously, £3,000 isn't that hard to raise if you get a job during the holiday times.
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    (Original post by Uvagba)
    [...] I have only just been informed (a week before my course starts) that I am 'not eligible' for a tuition fee loan, as I am resitting my second year, and I already had to resit my first year. Before prejudging as 'University not for you' etc, please just know that the past couple of years have been crazy for me, outside of university, and that the work has unfortunately played second-fiddle a lot of the time. Now, just as things have sorted themselves out there seems to be more spanners in the works!

    In basic, I did a foundation year 'Computing Foundation', before going onto an 'Accounting and Finance' degree course. Firstly they say this counts as an extra year as I transferred ti a different course, whereas I actually completed the course and went on to the degree, which I needed in order to move onto it. The fees for this year were a reduced £1200. I then did my first year, and had a resit, I was completely unable to attend. I then had to redo the whole year again just to do the resit (it was a core module so had to be done before progressing). Due to it only being one exam I was charged no tuition fees for this.

    Now my first actual resit of a year I am told that I am not entitled to a tuition fee loan as it is not my first resit. But I have not been funded for any extra tuition fees. Anyone that can provide any help on this, it would be very, very much appreciated. [...]
    Taiko is right; I did a foundation year in a computing subject, with reduced fees like you too, before transferring to an undergraduate degree in English, and I was well aware of the funding implications if I did not pass. In addition, whether you want to hear it or not, I think you should question whether university is right for you at the moment; it seems that you have other priorities at present. For example, you say that you were not charged tuition fees for your first year resit, but did you receive a maintenance grant?
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    There would've been no grant for the first year resit, as you have to be in attendance to qualify.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    Taiko is right; I did a foundation year in a computing subject, with reduced fees like you too, before transferring to an undergraduate degree in English, and I was well aware of the funding implications if I did not pass. In addition, whether you want to hear it or not, I think you should question whether university is right for you at the moment; it seems that you have other priorities at present. For example, you say that you were not charged tuition fees for your first year resit, but did you receive a maintenance grant?
    Cheers for the reply, but please don't question whether I should be at university. For one it completely misses the point, and secondly you are in no position to be able to judge me or my situation/previous situation properly. I have my reasons, and I don't want to go into them here. It is behind me now, and that is not the issue I am asking about. Thanks again.
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    (Original post by Uvagba)
    Cheers for the reply, but please don't question whether I should be at university. For one it completely misses the point, and secondly you are in no position to be able to judge me or my situation/previous situation properly. I have my reasons, and I don't want to go into them here. It is behind me now, and that is not the issue I am asking about. Thanks again.
    That is all well and good, but the student loan company will (or have) judge you with little or no detail about your circumstances. In addition, I think a dose of realism is necessary; the first two years of university are academically easy (the first year is almost impossible to fail), and you failed to pass them on two separate occasions. There might have been extenuating circumstances, but it seems odd to me that neither you nor someone from your university had the sense to withdraw from university to avoid further repercussions. My girlfriend, for example, had a number of issues in her third year, and the year tutor, who happened also to be my programme leader so we discussed these issues as a group, basically advised her to drop out, take some time to resolve her issues and then retake her third year the following year so that she would stand a better chance of graduating with a respectable mark instead of finishing her degree with an extremely poor mark. She had to make some sacrifices (she did not graduate with her friends and had to move out of student accommodation), but it was worth it in the end as she graduated with a better mark then she would have. It seems to me that it is not the student loan company who you should be 'blaming' (do you not realise just how much money you have borrowed so far?), but your university. Their behaviour seems rather suspect to be honest.

    I apologise if you think I am being harsh or impersonal but I am giving you as much personal experience as I possibly can so you can make the best decision(s). I am not suggesting that you should not be at university, but whether you can be there.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    That is all well and good, but the student loan company will (or have) judge you with little or no detail about your circumstances. In addition, I think a dose of realism is necessary; the first two years of university are academically easy (the first year is almost impossible to fail), and you failed to pass them on two separate occasions. There might have been extenuating circumstances, but it seems odd to me that neither you nor someone from your university had the sense to withdraw from university to avoid further repercussions. My girlfriend, for example, had a number of issues in her third year, and the year tutor, who happened also to be my programme leader so we discussed these issues as a group, basically advised her to drop out, take some time to resolve her issues and then retake her third year the following year so that she would stand a better chance of graduating with a respectable mark instead of finishing her degree with an extremely poor mark. She had to make some sacrifices (she did not graduate with her friends and had to move out of student accommodation), but it was worth it in the end as she graduated with a better mark then she would have. It seems to me that it is not the student loan company who you should be 'blaming' (do you not realise just how much money you have borrowed so far?), but your university. Their behaviour seems rather suspect to be honest.

    I apologise if you think I am being harsh or impersonal but I am giving you as much personal experience as I possibly can so you can make the best decision(s). I am not suggesting that you should not be at university, but whether you can be there.
    I'll make it simple and say I can, and you are wrong. I know this, and I don't need your advise on it, thanks.
    But since you're insistent on going into it, I missed my final exam due to it being rearranged, and me being stuck away with the army, and being told by them that if I left to take the exam I would be classed as AWOL. I figured at the time, no real biggy; I know what I'm doing so I'll just do the resit, which I was not allowed to do because I hadn't failed the original exam, but rather hadn't sat it. These extenuating circumstances seemed to mean nothing to my university, and I was forced to resit the year doing a single hour a week... As you can imagine, not the most ideal situation by a long way. That is all I'm willing to say on the matter, now move on please.
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    Means nothing, for funding purposes you're not eligible. You really need to grow up on this, as before you made a decision without thinking of the consequences. Those consequences are now rearing their head, and you only have yourself to blame.
 
 
 
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