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    Hello everyone,

    I've graduate in Linguistics this year and I'm planning on going into human rights law. What is the best route to take? Would I be required to do the 3 years degree over again or are there any alternate methods which hold the same status?

    I would really appreciate your advice and thoughts on this!

    Thank you,

    Milli
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    Conversion course, GDL - takes a year full time.
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    Have you looked into the GDL programme? Available at some unis or, if not, legal institutions such as the College of Law or BPP on a year full-time or two year part-time basis. However, your chance of moving into employment beyond this will all hinge on factors such as how you perform in the GDL, how you perform in the subsequent LPC and the institution you did your degree at, as well as the classification you obtained and any relevant work experience (such as vacation schemes).
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    I read that the GDL programme doesn't cover all aspects of Law, considering that is only one year. As a result it's not as credible as a 3 years law degree and will subsequently reduce my chances of being considered for a law firm. Is this true?
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    (Original post by Milli)
    I read that the GDL programme doesn't cover all aspects of Law, considering that is only one year. As a result it's not as credible as a 3 years law degree and will subsequently reduce my chances of being considered for a law firm. Is this true?
    That's utter rubbish. It covers all the compulsory sections of a qualifying law degree. Half of all new solicitors did a non-law degree & then converted.

    If you're serious about going into law - bear in mind it will cost you 2 years' law school fees + living costs for 2 years, you really should go and do some research first and not believe rumours that you hear!

    Have a look at these sites:

    www.thelawyer.com

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/becomingasolicitor.law
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    (Original post by angelmxxx)
    That's utter rubbish. It covers all the compulsory sections of a qualifying law degree. Half of all new solicitors did a non-law degree & then converted.

    If you're serious about going into law - bear in mind it will cost you 2 years' law school fees + living costs for 2 years, you really should go and do some research first and not believe rumours that you hear!

    Have a look at these sites:

    www.thelawyer.com

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/becomingasolicitor.law
    Glad to hear that! Living costs wont be a problem as I'll be travelling from home. I'm serious about human rights law and would love to specialise in this area.

    Thank you for the websites!
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    (Original post by Milli)
    I read that the GDL programme doesn't cover all aspects of Law, considering that is only one year. As a result it's not as credible as a 3 years law degree and will subsequently reduce my chances of being considered for a law firm. Is this true?
    Nope.
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    (Original post by Milli)
    I read that the GDL programme doesn't cover all aspects of Law, considering that is only one year. As a result it's not as credible as a 3 years law degree and will subsequently reduce my chances of being considered for a law firm. Is this true?
    As someone else said, there's no disadvantage to taking the GDL. I was told by the head of Graduate Recruitment at a magic circle firm that those who have studied a different undergraduate degree often perform better than those who have only studied law as they bring different skills to the job. I wouldn't recommend taking a law degree, it'd be a waste of your time considering you could do the GDL...
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    If you want to go into more depth then there are senior status law degrees of 2 years. But the GDL will do the job in one
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    I still don't understand this obsession with "Human Rights law"
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    (Original post by Milli)
    Hello everyone,

    I've graduate in Linguistics this year and I'm planning on going into human rights law. What is the best route to take? Would I be required to do the 3 years degree over again or are there any alternate methods which hold the same status?

    I would really appreciate your advice and thoughts on this!

    Thank you,

    Milli
    What do you mean by "human rights law" as many areas of law incorporate this but it is not really a discrete discipline.

    You may mean working for a social justice type law firm? This is a very competitive area of law so only consider it at the moment if you

    a) have a very good degree (2.1 oxbridge, durham etc or 1st from anywhere else)

    b) are able to gain EXTENSIVE work experience over the next couple of years with an HR element eg death row volunteering, working for a DV charity, Prison advice, immigration advice
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    (Original post by Milli)
    I read that the GDL programme doesn't cover all aspects of Law, considering that is only one year. As a result it's not as credible as a 3 years law degree and will subsequently reduce my chances of being considered for a law firm. Is this true?
    I don't mean to be funny, but it doesn't really sound like you've thought about this very seriously. Do you have any work experience in human rights law (or any legal sector), or experience volunteering for one of the legal aid charities? If you haven't, why do you want to be a human rights lawyer, and why did you not realise until you graduated - I'm not trying to be rude, this is a question that will come up at interview and you need to think about it. Have you applied for any training contracts or vacation schemes? Do the firms you want to work for recruit two years ahead?

    Even living at home you're still looking at £6000 for the GDL and £8000+ for the LPC, plus probably another £3000 each year for clothes, food and travel. £20,000 is a lot of money, and it's even more if you won't necessarily have a job at the end of it and don't have the experience to be sure that it's the career that you want and to show employers that you can do the job.

    Finally, without wanting to be overly negative, you should bear in mind what others have said: law is very competitive, and "human rights" is a very 'trendy' area to aim for. Before you take this step look carefully at your CV: Do you have a good 2(i) or better from a respectable university? Do you have good A levels (or equivalent)? Do you have legal work experience? Do you have a variety of extra-curriculars and positions of responsibility? Do you have experience relevant to human rights? If you answered "no" to any of those questions, what is it that makes you stand out when compared to the dozens of applicants that do? My aim by asking this is not to discourage you, simply to make sure you have looked objectively at your chances and your commitment.
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    (Original post by LoveBites)
    I was told by the head of Graduate Recruitment at a magic circle firm that those who have studied a different undergraduate degree often perform better than those who have only studied law as they bring different skills to the job.
    Some people say this but I don't really buy this unless someone has done e.g. particular languages that might be of use in their job. I don't really see that an English or History graduate brings more to the table than someone who did Law. It's all pretty much even.

    But certainly, doing the GDL does not put anyone at a disadvantage except if you encounter the odd recruiter at a smaller firm who prefers someone to have studied Law (this doesn't tend to happen so much any more).
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    subscribed :ninja:
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    (Original post by Fysidiko)
    I don't mean to be funny, but it doesn't really sound like you've thought about this very seriously. Do you have any work experience in human rights law (or any legal sector), or experience volunteering for one of the legal aid charities? If you haven't, why do you want to be a human rights lawyer, and why did you not realise until you graduated - I'm not trying to be rude, this is a question that will come up at interview and you need to think about it. Have you applied for any training contracts or vacation schemes? Do the firms you want to work for recruit two years ahead?

    Even living at home you're still looking at £6000 for the GDL and £8000+ for the LPC, plus probably another £3000 each year for clothes, food and travel. £20,000 is a lot of money, and it's even more if you won't necessarily have a job at the end of it and don't have the experience to be sure that it's the career that you want and to show employers that you can do the job.

    Finally, without wanting to be overly negative, you should bear in mind what others have said: law is very competitive, and "human rights" is a very 'trendy' area to aim for. Before you take this step look carefully at your CV: Do you have a good 2(i) or better from a respectable university? Do you have good A levels (or equivalent)? Do you have legal work experience? Do you have a variety of extra-curriculars and positions of responsibility? Do you have experience relevant to human rights? If you answered "no" to any of those questions, what is it that makes you stand out when compared to the dozens of applicants that do? My aim by asking this is not to discourage you, simply to make sure you have looked objectively at your chances and your commitment.
    Thanks for your honest advice! In all honesty, no I don't have the relevant experience and yes I am confused

    Initially I wanted to go into journalism and report on international human right issues, but this is very far fetched considering that I don't have the relevant knowledge in that area. In all likelihood, I believe i could use one degree to inform or supplement my work on the other, to round out my journalism. If I specialise in human rights I could report on human right issues.

    I considered a masters in human rights but even then they want a law/politics related bachelors.

    I'm confused.
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    (Original post by Milli)
    Hello everyone,

    I've graduate in Linguistics this year and I'm planning on going into human rights law. What is the best route to take? Would I be required to do the 3 years degree over again or are there any alternate methods which hold the same status?

    I would really appreciate your advice and thoughts on this!

    Thank you,

    Milli

    Yeh conversion course, I wouldnt do law though, I know so many people who are unemployed who have done the conversion course. The course is also brutal from what Ive heard, just offering some advice.
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    (Original post by Milli)
    Thanks for your honest advice! In all honesty, no I don't have the relevant experience and yes I am confused

    Initially I wanted to go into journalism and report on international human right issues, but this is very far fetched considering that I don't have the relevant knowledge in that area. In all likelihood, I believe i could use one degree to inform or supplement my work on the other, to round out my journalism. If I specialise in human rights I could report on human right issues.

    I considered a masters in human rights but even then they want a law/politics related bachelors.

    I'm confused.
    As someone who works in media I'd suggest that you pitch ideas to Guardian's Comment is Free and build up a portfolio. Alternatively, if you could find a job in human rights, though from what my peers have told me/experienced first hand it involves 3-12 months working unpaid.

    You could find a job in this area and then move back to journalism later. I personally, would suggest you think long and very hard about a legal career, there are so many bright students who end up unemployed without any job prospects after leaving the course at the lpc/bvc level. Do bear that in mind please.
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    (Original post by Milli)
    Thanks for your honest advice! In all honesty, no I don't have the relevant experience and yes I am confused

    Initially I wanted to go into journalism and report on international human right issues, but this is very far fetched considering that I don't have the relevant knowledge in that area. In all likelihood, I believe i could use one degree to inform or supplement my work on the other, to round out my journalism. If I specialise in human rights I could report on human right issues.

    I considered a masters in human rights but even then they want a law/politics related bachelors.

    I'm confused.
    There are a number of organisations that offer human rights related internships, some of them more legal, some more journalistic. If you can afford it you could do one or more of those.
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    If you don't have the relevant knowledge to report on human rights issues from a journalistic sense, what made you think law would be a fall-back (presumably needing less knowledge!)?
 
 
 
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