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    I know it may sound silly but I just don't know how to take notes! My first lecture was on today and although it was fairly interesting I didn't make any notes. Other people around me were all scribbling stuff down (some more than others). Everything the lecturer said was on the projector, on his notes, which we all get a copy of during our tutorials (and I believe they are available online).

    So... what am I missing? HOW do u take notes during a lecture?
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    Bullet points and key words.

    Brain storm??
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    I thought most people didn't take notes - either the students recorded the lecture on dictaphones or the lecturer handed out notes at the end.

    I think a lot of people make notes for the sake of looking smart.
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    Maybe rephrase what he's saying so you completely understand? Idk.. sounds like there's no point tbh
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    Condense the notes down further and write down the very key points and add in anything extra he says that's not on the notes.
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    Your lecturer will not be reading directly from their own notes: they'll always elaborate on points or go off on slight tangents. That's what you should make notes on. You'll need much more than basic bullet points from handouts to really do well at uni. However, if you're the kind of person who learns best from listening anyway, then taking notes may just be a waste of ink.
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    Grab important points from slides and combine them with important things that the lecturer is saying. Jot down important references (not in full form, just, say, Smith 1991) if they are given. Paraphrase quotations, but make sure you get the name right so you can look it up later. If you have time, make very quick sketches of important diagrams, and definitely write down a given name for any diagram so you can easily look it up, print it out and insert it into your notes later. Often, lecturers will be working from a set textbook even if they aren't reading it out word for word, so try to find that set text so you can fill in the blanks about whatever subject you're studying if you don't like the pace of the lectures. I actually got a good grade for a module where I didn't understand half of the lectures at all due to the bloke who was taking them, because he was working from a good textbook that I could read up on later. It may also help to develop a kind of short-hand for long words to save some time, so for evapotranspiration, a term I have to use a lot in my chosen field within geography, I just use "E-T".

    I tend to just furiously write down everything that I see and hear, or as much of it as possible, and write it up on my computer later - it's exhausting but since I've got time to kill outside of lectures, it gets the job done - I can absorb information at my own pace. Some people take fewer notes but probably devote more attention to what is being said so it sinks in immediately. Some people even just put a dictaphone on, find a seat at the front of the lecture hall and take very sparse or even no notes. Regardless, you should be recording the information presented in some way so that you can access it later.
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    Learn and use a few shortcuts for words that pop up often, like your own type of shorthand.
    If absolutely everything he says you get a hard copy of, then you don't need to take notes I shouldn't think, but it will help it sink in better?
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    Unless you get a transcript of the entire lecture, you should be taking notes of the things said that are not on the slides/handouts.
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    (Original post by dd4483)
    I thought most people didn't take notes - either the students recorded the lecture on dictaphones or the lecturer handed out notes at the end.

    I think a lot of people make notes for the sake of looking smart.
    Ha, it's not Year 7. You either try hard, and you should do good, or the converse.
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    It kind of depends on your learning style.

    I find that when I write stuff down myself, it helps me learn it - just the act of writing something down. So I bullet point what's on the slides (the detail depends on whethermy lecturer puts the notes up online as some of them don't) and try to summarise any key points of what the lecturer is saying.

    But I can imagine that if you are more of an auditory learner it's not going to be too helpful to focus on notes; better for you to listen (or even ask if you can use a dictaphone to record the lecture).

    You'll also get to know the styles of different lecturers. Some of mine just have a slide show which they basically just read out, which goes up online. No point me taking too detailed notes - I can do it when I'm revising if I need to. Some basically use their slides to show images and not much else, so I need to take notes if I want to remember what they said or come back to it later.
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    (Original post by tehforum)
    Ha, it's not Year 7. You either try hard, and you should do good, or the converse.
    You don't necessarily have to be working hard in order to do well.
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    another good way is to look over friends notes after the lecture and get down points which you may not have had time to write down.
    Sharing information helps you to get a better overview and also see things from other perspectives.
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    Thanks for all the responses guys and gals. This particular lecture was just him reading things from his slides which are available to us afterwards anyway. Im more of an auditory learner so im just not gonna bother writing notes unless he writes something else on the blackboard thats not on the slides. All the things he says that "branch out from the slides" are interesting (well to me) but I can tell they are unimportant and are just his musings lol.

    I like the idea of a dictaphone though! I think i'll do that from now on, saves me from taking notes and plus I can actually absorb what he's saying there and then and "repeat" the lecture in my own time lolll.

    Thanks again!
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    often lecturers will expand on the information they put on the slides but if they don't in your course then don't bother taking notes!
    if you don't think it necessary, don't do it.
    whatever works best for you.
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    Print off lecture slides/notes in advance. Once the lecture has started listen to the lecturer and write down any important information s/he gives you, then try to link it with the notes on the slides.

    You could also try to record the lectures, but ask for permission to do this.
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    you really do need to take notes - the handouts are normally much less useful than what they say even though it may seem they are reading - if you struggle taking notes maybe follow the handout and add comments to the sections they talk about!

    also when it seems liek they are talking about their "musings" as you put it - i wouldn't dismiss it - its little things like that which you could shove in to get higher marks it often seems unimportant as its not necessarily needed, but if you note it, it shows u know ur stuff! they don't really say things for the sake of it!
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    You write down every other word they say and try to draw diagrams of each and every slide that is shown. That is the only way to do well in uni exams.
 
 
 
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