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    No nobody will accept you with that.
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    Definitely worth it. Well done on the AS marks in particular.
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    Have you thought about vocational training I don't think university is really for you.
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    You weren't really trying yet got 6A*'s and 5A's :rolleyes: that just makes you sound like you're bigging yourself up and I don't think this is a serious question.

    Anyway if you are serious why aren't you applying for Oxbridge with them grades?
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    People with better grades will be rejected (like me) but you would have a chance and should consider Oxbridge too (I got rejected by Oxford too)
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    (Original post by I_am_the_eggman)
    You weren't really trying yet got 6A*'s and 5A's :rolleyes: that just makes you sound like you're bigging yourself up and I don't think this is a serious question.

    Anyway if you are serious why aren't you applying for Oxbridge with them grades?
    He got 195/200 in History...

    Cambridge only accepts 201/200, and the occasional 200/200 :yes:
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    (Original post by I_am_the_eggman)
    You weren't really trying yet got 6A*'s and 5A's :rolleyes: that just makes you sound like you're bigging yourself up and I don't think this is a serious question.
    To be fair the OP goes to a high performing grammar school. Schools where great pressure is placed on getting good results and results like the OPs are only average to good.

    At many private schools and very high performing state schools (particularly certain grammars) students are coached into how to an answer exam questions. Getting high marks is as much technique, almost jumping through hoops, as it is what you know. Also most of these schools are going to be very middle class dominated and middle class students are going to be far more likely to have better support and more encouragement than working class students. As well as access to additional facilities and tutoring.

    So it's quite possible for someone to put little effort into their GCSEs but still come away with high grades. These people are usually bright students but have also been highly coached

    I could have put a lot more effort into my GCSEs but still managed 4 A*s, 5 As and a B (waaaaaay back in 2001). I didn't go to a private or even grammar school. But it was a high performing state faith school (althiugh with an intake of students from a mixed social background).

    There would have been people who put as much, effort as I put into my GCSEs and who are just as intelligent but who didn't get as high results.

    Also, about your Oxbridge comment, some departments at Durham (at a few other universities) can be more "competitive" than the same departments at Oxbridge. History being one.

    Cambridge and Oxford have the benefit of being able to interview all applicants. It's not quite as blind as it is in most other universities where applicants can only be judged on grades and a few words of a statement and reference.

    (Original post by callupjah)
    I was thinking of applying to Durham for the History (V100) course, but recently I've read a lot of stuff about Durham being particularly strict with regards to GCSEs, and possibly even having a cut off point.
    Meant to reply to your PM earlier but was having Internet troubles. I'll just reply here if you don't mind? If you want to know more than you can either ask here or PM me again but I'm not sure if I can really offer much :p:

    I haven't been able to find the modifier table, but due to the generally high level of attainment I assume my modifier would be very low, if not nonexistent.
    I don't think there's any actual clear cut off mark, certainly not the same semi-arbitary number each year. The department just make it no secret that a high number of A*s are preferred.

    The modifier table was a little difficult to find, I think. I can't actually find it at all now.

    This is possibly because I think they have either abandoned it or changed the system. I think it was discussed at a University Senate meeting back in June. Admissions tutors are informed if an applicants' school is below average. So for those from poorer schools context is still taken into account, but I'm not sure if the measurement/modifier score is still used

    The Modifier table wasn't actually used by every department anyway. I'm not sure if history used it although they do certainly look at GCSE resuts.

    With predicted grades of A*A*A*, and the AS level at an A, I think you should certainly apply.

    Your GCSEs are still excellent results.

    You won't know unless you apply. It is competitive, you might get rejected, but then you've probably got just as good a chance of getting an offer.

    In short; your qualiications are comparable to the average Durham history student. Perhaps even slightly better in terms of your A-level results. It's not like you're applying with only 3 A*s and a few As, then and A*BB at AS level.

    So yes your application will be considered and there is a fairly realtistic possibility of an offer.
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    (Original post by River85)
    To be fair the OP goes to a high performing grammar school. Schools where great pressure is placed on getting good results and results like the OPs are only average to good.

    At many private schools and very high performing state schools (particularly certain grammars) students are coached into how to an answer exam questions. Getting high marks is as much technique, almost jumping through hoops, as it is what you know. Also most of these schools are going to be very middle class dominated and middle class students are going to be far more likely to have better support and more encouragement than working class students. As well as access to additional facilities and tutoring.

    So it's quite possible for someone to put little effort into their GCSEs but still come away with high grades. These people are usually bright students but have also been highly coached

    I could have put a lot more effort into my GCSEs but still managed 4 A*s, 5 As and a B (waaaaaay back in 2001). I didn't go to a private or even grammar school. But it was a high performing state faith school (althiugh with an intake of students from a mixed social background).

    There would have been people who put as much, effort as I put into my GCSEs and who are just as intelligent but who didn't get as high results.

    Also, about your Oxbridge comment, some departments at Durham (at a few other universities) can be more "competitive" than the same departments at Oxbridge. History being one.

    Cambridge and Oxford have the benefit of being able to interview all applicants. It's not quite as blind as it is in most other universities where applicants can only be judged on grades and a few words of a statement and reference.



    Meant to reply to your PM earlier but was having Internet troubles. I'll just reply here if you don't mind? If you want to know more than you can either ask here or PM me again but I'm not sure if I can really offer much :p:



    I don't think there's any actual clear cut off mark, certainly not the same semi-arbitary number each year. The department just make it no secret that a high number of A*s are preferred.

    The modifier table was a little difficult to find, I think. I can't actually find it at all now.

    This is possibly because I think they have either abandoned it or changed the system. I think it was discussed at a University Senate meeting back in June. Admissions tutors are informed if an applicants' school is below average. So for those from poorer schools context is still taken into account, but I'm not sure if the measurement/modifier score is still used

    The Modifier table wasn't actually used by every department anyway. I'm not sure if history used it although they do certainly look at GCSE resuts.

    With predicted grades of A*A*A*, and the AS level at an A, I think you should certainly apply.

    Your GCSEs are still excellent results.

    You won't know unless you apply. It is competitive, you might get rejected, but then you've probably got just as good a chance of getting an offer.

    In short; your qualiications are comparable to the average Durham history student. Perhaps even slightly better in terms of your A-level results. It's not like you're applying with only 3 A*s and a few As, then and A*BB at AS level.

    So yes your application will be considered and there is a fairly realtistic possibility of an offer.

    Cheers for clearing that all up. I will be sure to apply to Durham as I like the course and it seems like a great place to be, and if I'm with a chance and its only one out of five choices then I might as well really. I'm sending off my application in a couple of days so I'll let you know how it goes! Once again, thanks for the help.
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    (Original post by callupjah)
    I was thinking of applying to Durham for the History (V100) course, but recently I've read a lot of stuff about Durham being particularly strict with regards to GCSEs, and possibly even having a cut off point.

    For GCSEs I ended up with 6A*(eng. lit, history, geog., business studies, chemistry, religious studies) and 5 As (phys., maths, french, eng. lang., bio.). I also go to a state grammar, so my points score is 602 points, compared to a school average: 582 points. I haven't been able to find the modifier table, but due to the generally high level of attainment I assume my modifier would be very low, if not nonexistent.

    So, basically, do you know within the context of my GCSE's and school background if it's worth applying?

    Cheers, any help would be much appreciated!
    Durham have stopped using the modifier for 2010 (entry 2011) applications. Instead, they look at whether your school performed above or below the national average GCSE results.

    They do say they that
    of those applicants who have taken GCSEs, a high proportion have achieved top marks in most subjects taken.
    and they say they have 'excellent' UMS scores too but you're allowed to have one high risk choice, after all.

    source: Durham history website
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    (Original post by callupjah)
    Thanks for the link, I'm going to get my referee to mention all my UMS and will declare my grades, even though I don't think my school certificates them, I think I can still declare them right? Hopefully that'll help my application.
    Hmm, I don't think you can. The TSR UCAS Apply wiki agrees and says you must leave them as pending. You might want to check with UCAS to see if that's still the case. If your results are mentioned in your reference, I wouldn't worry too much- unis will still see what you had.
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    (Original post by callupjah)
    I never said I wasn't applying for Oxbridge. Yes it is a serious question, I have heard it around and read on TSR that Durham have a quota for GCSEs of 7+ that has to be met or the application is binned. That's why I posted it here, in the Durham forum, so someone with an actual knowledge of the history admissions system for the university could advise me on whether or not an application is worth it, and will even be considered.

    I wasn't trying to 'big myself up', my GCSEs aren't much better than average within my school, where the best A Level candidates will all have 10A*+.
    I have heard it around and read on TSR that Durham have a quota for GCSEs of 7+

    Rubbish!
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    (Original post by hypocriticaljap)
    I have heard it around and read on TSR that Durham have a quota for GCSEs of 7+

    Rubbish!
    No, there's certainly no strict number expect in any department.

    But the history department do openly declare their preference for a "high number of A*s including an A* in history". High number if unlikely to be anything less than five. But, being a preference, exceptions are made. I still re-iterate that for the OP, who does have a high number of A*s, an application is certainly worthwhile.

    I've heard people trying to tell me that Philosophy and Politics,departments I know well, operate some quota system. They don't seem to listen to me when I tell them it's nonsense and, having direct experience of the departments (and knowing the admissions tutors) I know this is rubbish. But I must be wrong as they'd rather believe that person at the open day who told them that seven A*s are needed.

    I don't know why it's always seven.

    I think these rumous are spread by fellow applicants in order to put off other applicants
 
 
 
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