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    Hey guys.

    I'm a bit confused at the moment as I'm sort of still mostly weighing up my options.

    I've been advised by most of the games programmers where I did my work placement to just go to a Uni which focuses mainly on C/C# (if not C++) seeing as Java isn't really good for games programming unless you're looking to do iPhone apps... etc. However, I'm really stumped as to which University teaches C the most. It's hard to get an idea just from looking online at their course structure, so I figured I'd ask and see whether anyone had been to a good uni which focuses on this or knows of one.

    I'm still unsure where to go specifically, but based on my qualifications I'm sort of swinging towards Kent (but they focus on Java), Surrey (not sure entirely), Nottingham (not sure), Sussex, and Reading.

    I don't have A Level Maths unfortunately so couldn't just apply to Computer Games Technology at Abertay but they told me of Computer Games Application Development instead - (http://www.abertay.ac.uk/studying/find/ug/cgad/) of which I know nothing about or if it's even that good. I'm also looking at Derby's Games Programming course.

    I'm not actually that sure of whether any of them really concentrate on the right stuff for me, but I know Computer Science is the right degree/path to take.

    Advice?
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    Shame you don't have A-level maths. That limits your choices quite a bit. You'll probably find that at most unis, most of what they teach isn't really tied to any particular language. Even if the coursework has to be done in Java, the language is often irrelevant to the theory the course is teaching.

    Oh and don't think of C# as being similar to C and C++. Other than the name, it's not really any closer to them than Java is. It is used quite a bit for programming tools for games, but it wouldn't take that long to get the hang of C# if you know Java.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Shame you don't have A-level maths. That limits your choices quite a bit. You'll probably find that at most unis, most of what they teach isn't really tied to any particular language. Even if the coursework has to be done in Java, the language is often irrelevant to the theory the course is teaching.

    Oh and don't think of C# as being similar to C and C++. Other than the name, it's not really any closer to them than Java is. It is used quite a bit for programming tools for games, but it wouldn't take that long to get the hang of C# if you know Java.
    Yeah I'm totally kicking myself about it, but ah well. I'm just wondering whether just learning Java limits me too much to not being able to go on to do games programming. C++ is really what I need but I've been told it's much harder to jump right into that without getting the hang of a basic language such as C or C# first.

    Thanks though
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    I'd reccomend a little C first, then jump into c++. But hey, just my opinion really..

    Anyway, information I can give you is: if you do CompSci at Sussex, you'll learn java. (with the exception of doing the foundation year first which will get you some c and c++)
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    Yeah I think I'd go with C first too. Ah, really? Interesting. I guess you can always learn C (and C++) alongside Java or separate? Are they really different?
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    Well, I've never used java before, so I'm not going to say much about comparisons.

    But yes, learning other languages in your own time never does any harm.
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    Since when were iPhone apps written in Java?
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    (Original post by microserfs)
    Yeah I think I'd go with C first too. Ah, really? Interesting. I guess you can always learn C (and C++) alongside Java or separate? Are they really different?
    Programming in most languages is fundamentally similar. Java and C++ do have big differences, but there are many concepts that apply to both, as well as many other languages. Once you get the hang of programming, it's not usually that difficult to learn another language. Unless it uses a vastly different paradigm. It's a bit of a head **** going from a procedural language like C/C++/C#/Java/etc. to a declarative one like Haskell or Prolog.

    For a job in games you will need to at least be competent in C. But you can become competent in C by doing it on the side while you are taught Java at uni. Anyway, I'm sure at any uni you will have the chance to do projects where you can pick the language you want to use.
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    (Original post by K the Failure)
    Since when were iPhone apps written in Java?
    Good point. They're generally written in Objective-C (yet another C derivative:p: )
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Programming in most languages is fundamentally similar. Java and C++ do have big differences, but there are many concepts that apply to both, as well as many other languages. Once you get the hang of programming, it's not usually that difficult to learn another language. Unless it uses a vastly different paradigm. It's a bit of a head **** going from a procedural language like C/C++/C#/Java/etc. to a declarative one like Haskell or Prolog.

    For a job in games you will need to at least be competent in C. But you can become competent in C by doing it on the side while you are taught Java at uni. Anyway, I'm sure at any uni you will have the chance to do projects where you can pick the language you want to use.
    Oh yeah, Haskell is taught at Kent alongside Occam, PHP and then mainly Java. They have an optional module for C.

    I've got a list of universities I'd be interested in, but I guess calling round them to find out the language they focus on couldn't hurt.

    If Java is fine to learn C alongside then I guess I'd be happy enough. Reading and Nottingham are both places I'd be interested to go to, but if I could get into Bristol, UWS or Kings I'd be happy.
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    (Original post by K the Failure)
    Since when were iPhone apps written in Java?
    Oh my bad, I think I must have remembered wrong.
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    (Original post by microserfs)
    If Java is fine to learn C alongside then I guess I'd be happy enough. Reading and Nottingham are both places I'd be interested to go to, but if I could get into Bristol, UWS or Kings I'd be happy.
    I went to Bristol and I ended up programming games, so I can vouch for that one.
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    Just jump right in and learn C++. Learning C# or C first isn't necessary. If I was able to learn C++ when I was 14 (and I know others who started even earlier) then I'm fairly sure you will be able to do it at whatever age you are.

    As for the course you do, I wouldn't do a games course unless you want to be forced into a specific job area (and thus suffer from unemployment). Sure making games is great, but if you can't even use C++ yet I'm afraid your chances of getting into a games programming job off the bat are slim. I have a friend doing the course at derby and he says it's good.

    Personally I recommend doing a computer science course, because then at least that way if you fail as a games programmer (which isn't unlikely, how many people do you think want to make games?) then I don't think a computer games development degree is going to be what other programmer employers are looking for. Furthermore the majority of game programmer jobs I've looked at specify a want for a degree in Computer Science, not some unheard of and unregulated "game programming" degree.

    I'm doing Computer Science and building up my portfolio with my own game projects, I've put a lot of thought into how I'm going to stand out.

    That's my 2 cents.
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    (Original post by microserfs)
    Oh my bad, I think I must have remembered wrong.
    Probably thinking of the old school Java mobile games that you could get for old nokias (actually i still own one of those!) and the like. IPhone games are written in C++.
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    (Original post by Jallenbah)
    Just jump right in and learn C++. Learning C# or C first isn't necessary. If I was able to learn C++ when I was 14 (and I know others who started even earlier) then I'm fairly sure you will be able to do it at whatever age you are.

    As for the course you do, I wouldn't do a games course unless you want to be forced into a specific job area (and thus suffer from unemployment). Sure making games is great, but if you can't even use C++ yet I'm afraid your chances of getting into a games programming job off the bat are slim. I have a friend doing the course at derby and he says it's good.

    Personally I recommend doing a computer science course, because then at least that way if you fail as a games programmer (which isn't unlikely, how many people do you think want to make games?) then I don't think a computer games development degree is going to be what other programmer employers are looking for. Furthermore the majority of game programmer jobs I've looked at specify a want for a degree in Computer Science, not some unheard of and unregulated "game programming" degree.

    I'm doing Computer Science and building up my portfolio with my own game projects, I've put a lot of thought into how I'm going to stand out.

    That's my 2 cents.
    What Uni are you studying at? I am definitely going to put a portfolio together both this year and when I go to university for when I graduate. But yeah, I am aware most employers look for a Computer Science course over a games course. The Derby course I hear is quite good, seeing as it's taught by ex-industry lecturers. Other than Derby and UWS I wouldn't want to do any other games programming course as I've heard there's no point.

    I guess it would be best not to limit my choices anyway. As for the C++ I was only going by what I was told :o: I'm not really sure of the best route to take. I haven't really any language experience yet, but I'm going to be doing a little programming in my Access Course. I think C++ can be a monster of a language to learn, but then again, if you know where to start...
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    I went to Bristol and I ended up programming games, so I can vouch for that one.
    Yeah Bristol sounds like a good university to go to. It's very hard to get into though, I'll imagine. I'm gonna give them a call tomorrow.
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    (Original post by TheQueenOfComputerScience)
    Probably thinking of the old school Java mobile games that you could get for old nokias (actually i still own one of those!) and the like. IPhone games are written in C++.
    No, iPhone games are written in objective C or use adobe flash.
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    (Original post by TheQueenOfComputerScience)
    Probably thinking of the old school Java mobile games that you could get for old nokias (actually i still own one of those!) and the like. IPhone games are written in C++.
    Hey Out of curiosity what is Queens University like and what do you mostly study on the course? I was thinking of looking at Queens Uni, Belfast, but wasn't sure whether it was for me.
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    (Original post by Jallenbah)
    As for the course you do, I wouldn't do a games course unless you want to be forced into a specific job area (and thus suffer from unemployment). Sure making games is great, but if you can't even use C++ yet I'm afraid your chances of getting into a games programming job off the bat are slim. I have a friend doing the course at derby and he says it's good.

    Personally I recommend doing a computer science course, because then at least that way if you fail as a games programmer (which isn't unlikely, how many people do you think want to make games?) then I don't think a computer games development degree is going to be what other programmer employers are looking for. Furthermore the majority of game programmer jobs I've looked at specify a want for a degree in Computer Science, not some unheard of and unregulated "game programming" degree.

    Not true. I know of people who have gone straight into the finance industry on graduation from games programming degrees.
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    (Original post by Jallenbah)
    No, iPhone games are written in objective C or use adobe flash.
    Don't contradict the iPhone game widow! IPhone apps are usually written in objective C. Games are either written in some scripting language using an engine which then converts the game into C++ or written directly in C++. Adobe flash has been banned by apple.

    I'll check with John when he gets home to make sure im totally correct.
 
 
 
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