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    Hey guys,

    so one of the unis I chose to apply to is Manchester for PPE and UCAS says "If you apply for this course you may be invited to attend an interview or audition or provide a portfolio, essay or other piece of work.".

    Does anyone have any experience if Manchester actually interviews? Or do I have to submit written work?

    Thanks a lot.
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    Hi there,

    I graduated from a PPE degree last year from Durham. I was accepted to Manchester also (foolishly chose Durham instead!). I was given an unconditional offer without an interview and without having to submit anything. However this was four years ago and it may have changed since then. Also, it may be that candidates that are more on the margins are brought in for interview or are asked for written work. The fact that I was applying post-A-levels may also have been a factor. Durham ended up accepting me without an interview also.

    My advice generally would be not to let the prospect of an interview or request for work submission put you off. If you are a good enough candidate to get an interview, then you are bright enough to get through one.

    The advice I would give if you do get an interview is fairly straightforward and will put you well ahead of most of the other candidates: go onto the website and read about the modules in each department particularly for first year. Here's the link http://www.socialsciences.manchester...10/what/ppe/#1

    As you can see, the philosophy components for first year are 'critical thinking' and 'mind and language'. There is one compulsary politics module -- political theory, which is basically political philosophy -- and a choice between comparitive politics and international politics. The economics will be one mathematical and one theoretical. The mathematical component depends on how far you took maths at school.

    There are a few things you can then do, pretty much all on wikipedia if you choose, to get knowledgeable on these modules. Pretty much learn a few of the key theories in each area:

    Critical thinking -- I never studied this at university but read have read a few books on it. Key terms you need to learn here are 'premise', 'valid', 'justified' and 'true'. You need to learn what these mean in a philosophical context. Very central to critical thinking is the difference between a valid statement and a true statement. Also learn some logical fallacies. There's a huge database on this on wikipedia which is very good.

    Mind and language -- key ideas in philosophy of mind are 'dualism', 'materialism' and 'functionalism'. Descartes is always a good place to start with this (he was a dualist) -- if you can talk about the cartesian theater and some the ideas of Descarte on mind, the person interviewing you will be very impressed. Philosophy of language I know less about, but read some of Noam Chomsky's stuff on universal grammar, innate acquisition of language and generative grammar.

    Poltical theory is a huge area of study and there are lots of different thinkers. I imagine since it's an introduction there'll be a lot on studying key ideas in liberalism, conservatism, socialism ad the third way. There's so much you could potential read on this. Key thinkers in liberalism are John Stuart Mill, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The most important thinker by far in conservatism in my view is Edmund Burke. For socialism and communism read a little on Marx and maybe get a copy of The Communist Manifesto. Third way, just read a bit about the Blair and Clinton years and you'll get the jist.

    Comparitive or internation politics should be fairly self-explanatory, differences between the US and UK for instance -- e.g. codified vs. non-codified constitution. Differences between UK and Germany -- e.g. single member constituencies vs. proportional representation.

    Economics -- learn about consumer theory and producer theory. Maybe something on economic growth and productive capacity.

    To be honest I would really consider dropping the econ when there or ideally before you apply unless you are strong at maths and really want to study it. I found it to be the least interesting by far and it dragged by degree down to a 2:2.

    As for submitting written work -- just submit your best essay from school. I imagine you did at least one of the following subjects if you didn't take one or more of the PPE at A-level: History, English, Religious Studies, Geography, Psychology. An essay from any of those subjects would be fine.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by durhamppegrad)
    Hi there,

    I graduated from a PPE degree last year from Durham. I was accepted to Manchester also (foolishly chose Durham instead!). I was given an unconditional offer without an interview and without having to submit anything. However this was four years ago and it may have changed since then. Also, it may be that candidates that are more on the margins are brought in for interview or are asked for written work. The fact that I was applying post-A-levels may also have been a factor. Durham ended up accepting me without an interview also.

    My advice generally would be not to let the prospect of an interview or request for work submission put you off. If you are a good enough candidate to get an interview, then you are bright enough to get through one.

    The advice I would give if you do get an interview is fairly straightforward and will put you well ahead of most of the other candidates: go onto the website and read about the modules in each department particularly for first year. Here's the link http://www.socialsciences.manchester...10/what/ppe/#1

    As you can see, the philosophy components for first year are 'critical thinking' and 'mind and language'. There is one compulsary politics module -- political theory, which is basically political philosophy -- and a choice between comparitive politics and international politics. The economics will be one mathematical and one theoretical. The mathematical component depends on how far you took maths at school.

    There are a few things you can then do, pretty much all on wikipedia if you choose, to get knowledgeable on these modules. Pretty much learn a few of the key theories in each area:

    Critical thinking -- I never studied this at university but read have read a few books on it. Key terms you need to learn here are 'premise', 'valid', 'justified' and 'true'. You need to learn what these mean in a philosophical context. Very central to critical thinking is the difference between a valid statement and a true statement. Also learn some logical fallacies. There's a huge database on this on wikipedia which is very good.

    Mind and language -- key ideas in philosophy of mind are 'dualism', 'materialism' and 'functionalism'. Descartes is always a good place to start with this (he was a dualist) -- if you can talk about the cartesian theater and some the ideas of Descarte on mind, the person interviewing you will be very impressed. Philosophy of language I know less about, but read some of Noam Chomsky's stuff on universal grammar, innate acquisition of language and generative grammar.

    Poltical theory is a huge area of study and there are lots of different thinkers. I imagine since it's an introduction there'll be a lot on studying key ideas in liberalism, conservatism, socialism ad the third way. There's so much you could potential read on this. Key thinkers in liberalism are John Stuart Mill, Thomas Hobbes and John Locke. The most important thinker by far in conservatism in my view is Edmund Burke. For socialism and communism read a little on Marx and maybe get a copy of The Communist Manifesto. Third way, just read a bit about the Blair and Clinton years and you'll get the jist.

    Comparitive or internation politics should be fairly self-explanatory, differences between the US and UK for instance -- e.g. codified vs. non-codified constitution. Differences between UK and Germany -- e.g. single member constituencies vs. proportional representation.

    Economics -- learn about consumer theory and producer theory. Maybe something on economic growth and productive capacity.

    To be honest I would really consider dropping the econ when there or ideally before you apply unless you are strong at maths and really want to study it. I found it to be the least interesting by far and it dragged by degree down to a 2:2.

    As for submitting written work -- just submit your best essay from school. I imagine you did at least one of the following subjects if you didn't take one or more of the PPE at A-level: History, English, Religious Studies, Geography, Psychology. An essay from any of those subjects would be fine.

    Good luck!


    Thanks a lot
    At this point I have already received an offer from Manchester and they didn't ask for interview nor for written work, so I was just panicking before
 
 
 
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