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    i said 'the syntactily interesting opening line suggests an almost apologetic tone'

    pretty sure that isn't a word..
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    (Original post by oh! such a dastardly plan)
    Although I didn't do Oswald, I considered God and religion to be quite a good topic to follow when it came to time and mortality. I used it to describe how Dickinson's dreamy, rhyming stanzas showed an uncertainty of life after death, creating childlike imagery that encourages hope?
    Thank you! Yes, I remember saying something along those lines. I think I said something about the journey with death being eery and uncertain, like life often is. Only I thought that the kids were dead and that after that Dickenson becomes more intrigued by immortality than death itself, since she has now experienced the cruelty of death first hand. I think something in the structure changed which supported that. Not sure, damn by s****y memory.
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    (Original post by harriepoppy)
    Thank you! Yes, I remember saying something along those lines. I think I said something about the journey with death being eery and uncertain, like life often is. Only I thought that the kids were dead and that after that Dickenson becomes more intrigued by immortality than death itself, since she has now experienced the cruelty of death first hand. I think something in the structure changed which supported that. Not sure, damn by s****y memory.
    stanza 4's opening lines was only 3 feet and ended in a spondee which completely threw the rhythm. i think it was a spondee...:rolleyes:
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    Talking of metrics that was the one thing that shocked me in the exam, that I could do metrics all of the sudden.
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    (Original post by Prince-Myshkin)
    stanza 4's opening lines was only 3 feet and ended in a spondee which completely threw the rhythm. i think it was a spondee...:rolleyes:
    Christ you've got a good memory! I'm pretty sure I noticed the change in meter at that point so maybe it was the other poem. Yes, it was, in the second stanza of the Oswald poem when there was a single word line that signified change in the direction of the poem. Gosh, I'm still so nervous about the whole thing, I just wish I knew whether I'm going to get an interview or not.
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    (Original post by alecangeltess)
    Talking of metrics that was the one thing that shocked me in the exam, that I could do metrics all of the sudden.
    Yeah me too. I don't think I've written about metrics in an exam before, but I thought the Dickinson was four-feet-three-feet throughout, and Oswald followed no pattern.

    I hope this is correct...
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    this is amazing to hear everyone's ideas

    i did the dickens and the oswald, and they both struck me as unbelievably sad :|
    i enjoyed the exam but i really didn't think i wrote enough and what i did write i can't really remember...
    roll on january 15th!
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    yeh dickinson was tetrameter/trimeter/tetrameter/trimeter in basis

    the other interesting thing i thought about it was the rhyme. before the change in meter stanza 4 it gets looser and looser. is bold in stanza 1, barely a pararhyme in stanza 2 and just doesnt in stanza 3. thought it meant something but couldn't get any further than saying it possibly implied her doubt was increasing, less and less comfotable.
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    I'm really worried now that I didn't talk enough about the structure of the poems or the main literary devices used. I just stuck to the themes and what I thought everything symbolised in context with the poet and supported all my arguments with the really simple techniques like, metaphor, simile, pararhyme, assonance, change in meter. I just felt like I didn't have enough time to do the peoms justice either. After reading all these responses I just keep thinking of all the things I could have said rather than all the things I did say. Oh well, I suppose that admissions tutors know that we only get and hour and a half.
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    (Original post by harriepoppy)
    I'm really worried now that I didn't talk enough about the structure of the poems or the main literary devices used. I just stuck to the themes and what I thought everything symbolised in context with the poet and supported all my arguments with the really simple techniques like, metaphor, simile, pararhyme, assonance, change in meter. I just felt like I didn't have enough time to do the peoms justice either. After reading all these responses I just keep thinking of all the things I could have said rather than all the things I did say. Oh well, I suppose that admissions tutors know that we only get and hour and a half.
    I did a similar thing also. I'm just hoping they're going on potential. Knowing fancy terms only demonstrates that your teacher has taught them to you, which is often not the case. As long as we've recognised these things we should be fine.
    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Rubberband)
    :shock: You must be my literary soul-mate!
    Do I detect a slight sarcastic undertone :p: But seriously its good that someone else wrote something similar. It makes it more possible that I wrote something of any worth.
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    I appear to have come late to conversation- but ill add my thoughts anyway.

    I did Milton and Oswald. Compared how milton thought time was a force to be overcome and defeated by the hope for an afterlife and the idea of hope for growth and regeneration through nature for Oswald.

    Did a lot on the auditory quality of milton's poem and a lot on the symbol of night and day (life and death) etc.

    Went quite well... i hope !!
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    (Original post by abs6392)
    Do I detect a slight sarcastic undertone :p: But seriously its good that someone else wrote something similar. It makes it more possible that I wrote something of any worth.
    Aha no, that wasn't meant to come off as snidey - reading it back it probably did :p:. Silly internetz.

    I know what you mean, I am glad somebody took a similar approach to me!
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    (Original post by willmaster)
    I appear to have come late to conversation- but ill add my thoughts anyway.

    I did Milton and Oswald. Compared how milton thought time was a force to be overcome and defeated by the hope for an afterlife and the idea of hope for growth and regeneration through nature for Oswald.

    Did a lot on the auditory quality of milton's poem and a lot on the symbol of night and day (life and death) etc.

    Went quite well... i hope !!
    Did Milton and Oswald too, I sort of ran with the concept of a race against time, ended up comparing them in the conclusion like this: the old couple in Oswald's poem bowed down to Time (ah thank you personification) and didn't catch up to it, instead they are stuck almost out of time in a limbo; wheras in Milton, Time is a clear loser to the more dominant 'Eternity' (ie. in Heaven) therefore the poem ends triumphantly. Oddly, in Oswald there is no death at the end, only a sort of macabre, ironic existence, but in Milton there was death, yet it was hopeful and victorious.

    I don't know about anyone else, but almost everything to do with rhyme and rhythm went right out the window as I got heavily distracted by metaphors and personification and theme and whatever else I've forgotten. I feel it was a better paper than the sample one though, I really liked the sources - I see Oswald was popular, LOVED that one :p:
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    (Original post by Squibakou)
    Did Milton and Oswald too, I sort of ran with the concept of a race against time, ended up comparing them in the conclusion like this: the old couple in Oswald's poem bowed down to Time (ah thank you personification) and didn't catch up to it, instead they are stuck almost out of time in a limbo; wheras in Milton, Time is a clear loser to the more dominant 'Eternity' (ie. in Heaven) therefore the poem ends triumphantly. Oddly, in Oswald there is no death at the end, only a sort of macabre, ironic existence, but in Milton there was death, yet it was hopeful and victorious.

    I don't know about anyone else, but almost everything to do with rhyme and rhythm went right out the window as I got heavily distracted by metaphors and personification and theme and whatever else I've forgotten. I feel it was a better paper than the sample one though, I really liked the sources - I see Oswald was popular, LOVED that one :p:
    Actually, i managed a little bit of rhyme and rhythm with milton. pretty basic stuff though:how the iambic pentameter is interupted by the
    'so it is with thee
    so it is with...'

    Changing the tone and poetic direction etc.

    Structurally mine was shambolic. did you find many clear points of comparison? apart from how time generally is presented. I found a tenuous life and death connection but otherwise it was a bit disparate!
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    (Original post by willmaster)
    Actually, i managed a little bit of rhyme and rhythm with milton. pretty basic stuff though:how the iambic pentameter is interupted by the
    'so it is with thee
    so it is with...'

    Changing the tone and poetic direction etc.

    Structurally mine was shambolic. did you find many clear points of comparison? apart from how time generally is presented. I found a tenuous life and death connection but otherwise it was a bit disparate!
    Darn youse =P I wanted to put that in but even with my teacher not noticing the bell and giving me an extra five minutes I didn't have the time. I compared how time is represented (negative/positive), the issue of being good/bad, ie. sins (milton was chock full of the 7 deadly sins stuff, yaaaaaay!!), the issue of bravery in the face of mortality/ the reaction to the influence of the personified 'Time', particularly comparing the beginnings and endings of the poems in terms of mood and word choice/syntax etc. I compared the similarities and differences in style, ie. personification and metaphor (what's a metaphor? For playing meta with, bad-um-bump) and how the writers both intended to portray time and all that jazz. And other stuff. I ramble, but it usually ends up making a decent amount of sense on a second reading...

    Did you feel fairly good about it afterwards though? I'm feeling ok, I'm basically trying not to think about it too much since obviously there's nothing that can be done at this stage.
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    (Original post by Squibakou)
    Darn youse =P I wanted to put that in but even with my teacher not noticing the bell and giving me an extra five minutes I didn't have the time. I compared how time is represented (negative/positive), the issue of being good/bad, ie. sins (milton was chock full of the 7 deadly sins stuff, yaaaaaay!!), the issue of bravery in the face of mortality/ the reaction to the influence of the personified 'Time', particularly comparing the beginnings and endings of the poems in terms of mood and word choice/syntax etc. I compared the similarities and differences in style, ie. personification and metaphor (what's a metaphor? For playing meta with, bad-um-bump) and how the writers both intended to portray time and all that jazz. And other stuff. I ramble, but it usually ends up making a decent amount of sense on a second reading...
    I did them too and something a lot similar. I looked at the representation of time and it's impact on mortality - with emphasis on the human reaction to being mortal and facing impending death and linked it in to the transience of the human soul (loads more on that last point in the Milton obv).

    Also how the rhyme scheme and structure in Milton is controlled and regular - reflecting the poet/persona's calm and fearless view of death.

    I'm not sure - was it okay if we jumbled the three topics (mortality time transience) and inter related it all or were we expected to separate them and analyse them like that?
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    (Original post by H_Winth)
    I did a similar thing also. I'm just hoping they're going on potential. Knowing fancy terms only demonstrates that your teacher has taught them to you, which is often not the case. As long as we've recognised these things we should be fine.
    Good luck!
    Let's hope so. Good luck to you too. Wait, where are you applying, not St John's I hope?
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    I'm kinda confused as to why people wrote x pages on one and y pages on another. Isn't better to do a constant comparison of each?

    Anyway I did Conrad and Dickens. I compared psychological to chronological time. In Conrad what is essentially a reasonably short event is drawn out at great length as the time is qualatative: its felt. Like if you sit in a boring lesson time lasts for ever / have a good time it goes by very quickly. In Conrad it was slow and felt either through dread or ecstasy accorsing to perspective. For Dickens the time was mechanical, like the structure: it went from a to b to c and was a distanced observation as opposed to a emotional engagement.

    Also talked about Master Humphrey's preference of animate over inanimate objects for their permanence and intransience and compared it to the fast paced, ephemeral imagery of shadows etc in Conrad. I also talked about freedom, how for both Mrs Verloc and Humphrey the present was a release from the past or the future, it was a lived moment. For Mrs Verloc I went so far as to call it a rapturous living in the moment, the climax being so ecstatic as to be sexual. To lower the tone I threw in some token Freud about the kinfe being a phallic symbol hence the woman rebels against the phallocentric order and is herself the one associated with symbolic power. Also in terms of perspective, I mentioned the woman was labelled 'mad' by the man yet form her perspective the mad thing would be to remain with him, his slave.

    The actual essay put it a lot better and related it to time, but I found quite a lot of my essay related to themes we explored last year in Mrs. Dalloway. Good luck all.

    If its any help, the ELAT decideds interview not placement.
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    (Original post by ratk)
    If its any help, the ELAT decideds interview not placement.
    unfortunately i think it does play some role in your application post-interview - i know the TSA does for ppe (a friend of mine last year was told that his TSA score was the reason he wasn't offered a place, even though he was interviewed).
 
 
 
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