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    Sorry guys I was stalking this thread and absent mindedly highlighting and clicking while I thread and I *think* I have just negged the above three posts (they're highlighted red but no number beside). Just want to say that if I have - sorry - it wasn't on purpose
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    Similar scenario with me. My school didn't register me, so I'm having to travel to Oxford too. It's only one and half hours away from me, I'm lucky in that respect. Poor you! Having to travel from Glasgow! Not good!
    I imagine a fair few people would have had problems registering, so we won't be alone.
    Just out of interest, how have you been preparing for the exam?
    Best of luck!
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    I just sat down to do the practice paper, did one poem and then realised I knew very well how to do it and was just wasting my time fretting. The only thing that did bother me slightly was the way the paper said; "In your introduction..." as if was inevitable that we would do one. I'm sure (I'm hoping, anyway) that it's not a big deal but I for one have never seen the point of introductions and I never do them in exam conditions. I usually just give a sort of introductory sentence, i.e - "In x by y, z is presented as (general statement). For example; (launch into essay)".

    Just for those curious among you; I was intending to compare "To the Reverend Shade of His Religious Father" and "Father's Bedroom". I tend to steer clear of prose because I'm better suited to in-depth analysis of poetic features.
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    (Original post by Myth717)
    I've read A guide to ELAT like 10x already. It does not mention how we base our essay ie close reading or theme it
    Didn't my worked example give you some ideas? I'm very keen to improve it, perhaps as soon as possible, so it would help if you could be clearer.

    I'm not even sure what you're uncertain about generally. Based on what people have told you so far in the thread, could you say what your plan is in approaching the test?

    (Original post by chebanana)
    The only thing that did bother me slightly was the way the paper said; "In your introduction..." as if was inevitable that we would do one. I'm sure (I'm hoping, anyway) that it's not a big deal but I for one have never seen the point of introductions and I never do them in exam conditions. I usually just give a sort of introductory sentence, i.e - "In x by y, z is presented as (general statement). For example; (launch into essay)".
    Mostly I think the introduction is just to give the examiner a clue as to where you intend on going, since they know that pressured answers can tend to wander away from the point.



    To everyone: I'll be keeping an eye on this thread (and some others) this evening and tomorrow with special attention, if you have any other last-minute questions about the ELAT that you think I can answer.
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    I wish I had looked at this a bit earlier, as I truly can't muster the energy to bother about it now, even while aware I'm going to have mass problems with the time limit. Maybe I will be able to convince myself tomorrow. Or maybe I will freak out on the day and cram the words in where I cannot normally. Who knows.
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    (Original post by coggles)
    I'm not going to give you a sample paragraph because that'd probably be counter-productive for you. Try it for yourself! I think you should have enough of an idea what to do by now.

    I'm happy to look at your sample paper for you if you really want me to, but bear in mind I'm just an applicant like you and haven't got any more knowledge about the test than anybody else does. You'd probably be better off getting a teacher to look at it.
    Trust me you've become my teacher, I'm going to attempt the sample paper again and send to you, seriously thank you so much, I'll paypal a small amount of cash for your trouble erm ye so any last min tips before I attempt it the second try as the first try was a disaster, since I spent like 45 minutes annotating the poems then hardly writing anything thnx again and to MBS it's not your guide to the elat which is a problem, it's me maybe if the guide was a little clearer on what not to do and what to do maybe more help but other then that it was a really good guide.
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    (Original post by MSB)
    Mostly I think the introduction is just to give the examiner a clue as to where you intend on going, since they know that pressured answers can tend to wander away from the point.
    Righto. So it wouldn't count against me if I didn't do one? I'm usually quite capable of staying on-task.
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    (Original post by Myth717)
    Trust me you've become my teacher, I'm going to attempt the sample paper again and send to you, seriously thank you so much, I'll paypal a small amount of cash for your trouble erm ye so any last min tips before I attempt it the second try as the first try was a disaster, since I spent like 45 minutes annotating the poems then hardly writing anything thnx again and to MBS it's not your guide to the elat which is a problem, it's me maybe if the guide was a little clearer on what not to do and what to do maybe more help but other then that it was a really good guide.
    Woah, okay, if you're being serious (can't tell) then really it's not that big a deal, and please don't rely on me as if I'm going to definitely help do you well.
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    I'm an overseas applicant ... so I have to stay after school to take the ELAT. Oh, how lovely.
    Anyway, I was wondering how we're supposed to cite the poem? Here (in US) we use MLA, not sure if that applies to the UK as well. I was writing the sample paper, and it was actually the minute things that got to me, such as the citing, and then whether or not four paragraphs were enough or whether I should write five ... and then how specific the thesis had to be. Having written so many timed writes (last year all I did was timed writing), analyzing and writing a paper on a piece of writing I've never seen before doesn't daunt me, but the little things I've mentioned do. Er. Help?
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    (Original post by chebanana)
    Righto. So it wouldn't count against me if I didn't do one? I'm usually quite capable of staying on-task.
    Since they ask for an introduction, I would recommend you write one. It doesn't matter how dull your introduction is if its short, and they do stress the "briefly".


    (Original post by Proserpine)
    I'm an overseas applicant ... so I have to stay after school to take the ELAT. Oh, how lovely.
    Anyway, I was wondering how we're supposed to cite the poem? Here (in US) we use MLA, not sure if that applies to the UK as well. I was writing the sample paper, and it was actually the minute things that got to me, such as the citing, and then whether or not four paragraphs were enough or whether I should write five ... and then how specific the thesis had to be. Having written so many timed writes (last year all I did was timed writing), analyzing and writing a paper on a piece of writing I've never seen before doesn't daunt me, but the little things I've mentioned do. Er. Help?
    I'm not sure how you intend on 'citing' in the test. They do not expect footnotes and a fully referenced bibliography, since they give you all the texts and don't expect reference to anything external.

    Beyond referring to the passages as "Passage A" and "Passage B" as you go along, or even just "(A)" and "(B)", there isn't much 'citing' to do.
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    (Original post by chebanana)
    Righto. So it wouldn't count against me if I didn't do one? I'm usually quite capable of staying on-task.
    When I did the practice paper my introduction was something like this:

    In this short essay, I will be discussing blah, blah and blah by comparing and contrasting passages ? and ?.


    ... Or something like that. It's not a real introduction, but like you I prefer getting started straight away. I spent a lot of time planning my essay, and by the time I was finished with that it was a lot easier to write the introduction - at least I was certain about where I was going by then
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    (Original post by MSB)
    To everyone: I'll be keeping an eye on this thread (and some others) this evening and tomorrow with special attention, if you have any other last-minute questions about the ELAT that you think I can answer.
    I studied English Language and Literature for AS/A2, and we had to structure our essays according to structure, narrative stance, grammar, etc. with a section for each. I've only had the opportunity to write 'other' essays for two pieces of coursework, which obviously I had much longer for. Does adopting this structure seem like a terrible idea? I don't point out things just for the sake of listing them and I always, always relate it back to the theme. I guess I can't do much about it now, only I'm a bit worried because I'm writing like 500 words on something like structure, when I can't think that this would play that big a part in another essay compared to something like word choice.

    Thanks.
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    (Original post by Orwell)
    Don't they recommend 30 minutes reading and planning, and 1 hour writing. I'm probably going to do that.
    Didn't see that, but that's what I was thinking anyway :-) the only other exam like this I did was for A2 lang/lit and I think that was 2hrs45? But it had another part too :-S still, I think I spent nearly two hours on the unseen so I'll have to be disciplined.
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    Also taking it in Oxford :-) though after having read through the site realised if I'd been more sensible I probably could have taken it locally. Glasgow is rather out of the way! I'm in Kent but my step-family's in Milton Keynes, which is only an hour away so I'm going up there tonight and driving over in the morning. Trying not to panic now that it's so close! Tis only one uni after all.
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    (Original post by darcied)
    I studied English Language and Literature for AS/A2, and we had to structure our essays according to structure, narrative stance, grammar, etc. with a section for each. I've only had the opportunity to write 'other' essays for two pieces of coursework, which obviously I had much longer for. Does adopting this structure seem like a terrible idea? I don't point out things just for the sake of listing them and I always, always relate it back to the theme. I guess I can't do much about it now, only I'm a bit worried because I'm writing like 500 words on something like structure, when I can't think that this would play that big a part in another essay compared to something like word choice.

    Thanks.
    It seems to me from what you've said that your ideas are pretty much correct.

    The possible downside to that way of ordering your structure that I can see is that it could potentially mean you running out of time with more interesting points to say. It is definitely fine to section your argument off into different literary features, but make sure that you order them well. As you say, you shouldn't say things just for the sake of it, and it would make sense to try to muster your strongest areas to the front. Basically, you don't want to be sat there for half an hour (or a third of the time) writing a little prefatory wander through, say, the similar and contrasting features of the syntax, simply because that was in your 'running order', when the most interesting things are happening with the imagery. It will certainly help when you are reading through the extracts and coming up with a plan to have a 'checklist' of things to look at, but don't stick to this when you are writing your essay; concentrate on working through the features you think are the most interesting first, going into as much detail as you can confidently talk about, and then get to the lesser aspects at the end if you have time.

    You shouldn't worry about it too much. In abstract terms structure seems like such a difficult thing, even when it comes to essays at any level, but once you get down to the material in front of you it'll be a lot easier.
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    (Original post by MSB)
    It seems to me from what you've said that your ideas are pretty much correct.

    The possible downside to that way of ordering your structure that I can see is that it could potentially mean you running out of time with more interesting points to say. It is definitely fine to section your argument off into different literary features, but make sure that you order them well. As you say, you shouldn't say things just for the sake of it, and it would make sense to try to muster your strongest areas to the front. Basically, you don't want to be sat there for half an hour (or a third of the time) writing a little prefatory wander through, say, the similar and contrasting features of the syntax, simply because that was in your 'running order', when the most interesting things are happening with the imagery. It will certainly help when you are reading through the extracts and coming up with a plan to have a 'checklist' of things to look at, but don't stick to this when you are writing your essay; concentrate on working through the features you think are the most interesting first, going into as much detail as you can confidently talk about, and then get to the lesser aspects at the end if you have time.

    You shouldn't worry about it too much. In abstract terms structure seems like such a difficult thing, even when it comes to essays at any level, but once you get down to the material in front of you it'll be a lot easier.
    That's a good point, as lexis and imagery always had to come at the end, but I suppose I'm not dealing with that exam board anymore and it doesn't make much sense to squash what might be the most important section. I guess I can order it however I like really. Thank you!
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    (Original post by MSB)


    To everyone: I'll be keeping an eye on this thread (and some others) this evening and tomorrow with special attention, if you have any other last-minute questions about the ELAT that you think I can answer.
    Is it a major boo-boo to not know the precise names of specific metric/rhyme schemes and stanza stuctures and things? I can usually recognise what's going on in those departments and be able to comment on them, but I know very few technical names apart from the really obvious ones like iambic pentameter. For one thing I was never really taught them in school and I would have probably forgotten them by now anyway.. So yeah, do you think it's worth trying to cram it into my head at the last minute? Or is it okay to comment on things even if you can't name them?
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    (Original post by coggles)
    Is it a major boo-boo to not know the precise names of specific metric/rhyme schemes and stanza stuctures and things? I can usually recognise what's going on in those departments and be able to comment on them, but I know very few technical names apart from the really obvious ones like iambic pentameter. For one thing I was never really taught them in school and I would have probably forgotten them by now anyway.. So yeah, do you think it's worth trying to cram it into my head at the last minute? Or is it okay to comment on things even if you can't name them?
    I'd imagine it would be far more important that you're able to explain what a spondee (or whatever) actually does within a poem than that you're able to identify it as one. Being able to name those things won't actually get you any further in terms of analysis, and unlike in school, you probably won't get brownie points just for remembering the names...:dontknow:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    I'd imagine it would be far more important that you're able to explain what a spondee (or whatever) actually does within a poem than that you're able to identify it as one. Being able to name those things won't actually get you any further in terms of analysis, and unlike in school, you probably won't get brownie points just for remembering the names...:dontknow:
    Okay, I thought that was probably the case, just wanted someone to reassure me. Thanks a lot
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    Quick question, which I was wondering about with a classmate who is also taking the ELAT tomorrow:

    Could we be put at a disadvantage by the extracts we choose to compare? For example, if we chose two prose pieces and didn't discuss any poetry, or vice versa. Or if we chose two relatively modern pieces and didn't discuss the older works, or vice versa.
 
 
 

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