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    Aaah! I'm taking the ELAT tomorrow and I don't feel like I'm prepared at all. :eek: I didn't realise until after i did the sample paper that there was so much emphasis on meter and syntax and the such....I'm from Ireland and they don't teach us anything like that here. I feel like I'm at a complete disadvange to everyone else. We usually focus more on the contextual stuff, even in unseen prose and poetry. I've tried teaching myself the basic rules of meter in poetry but I don't want to misuse them and look like an idiot...Advice please!!
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    (Original post by coggles)
    Okay, I thought that was probably the case, just wanted someone to reassure me. Thanks a lot
    What hobnob said.

    (Original post by daisyfaye)
    Quick question, which I was wondering about with a classmate who is also taking the ELAT tomorrow:

    Could we be put at a disadvantage by the extracts we choose to compare? For example, if we chose two prose pieces and didn't discuss any poetry, or vice versa. Or if we chose two relatively modern pieces and didn't discuss the older works, or vice versa.
    I don't see how sticking to prose or poetry would disadvantage anyone. I'm sure I only talked about poetry when I did it (albeit a while ago now), and it worked for me. If anything, I'd recommend sticking to the genres one is confident talking about.
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    heya have a quick question and if someone could answer it, it would be much appreciated! I'm trying to develop some kind of loose structure for the test and I was just wondering would you categorise syntax as structure or style?
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by bonny317)
    heya have a quick question and if someone could answer it, it would be much appreciated! I'm trying to develop some kind of loose structure for the test and I was just wondering would you categorise syntax as structure or style?
    Thanks!
    In prose, syntax, as in the arrangement of words within the sentence, would be style. The arrangement of sentences, paragraphs, etc., would be structure. In poetry this is a more complicated difference, since while structure would be to do with patterns of sound (rhyme, metre, stanzas, etc.) as well as the simple 'order', but this is bound to link with syntax somewhere.

    I can't see how it would particularly matter, though...
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    (Original post by MSB)

    I'm not sure how you intend on 'citing' in the test. They do not expect footnotes and a fully referenced bibliography, since they give you all the texts and don't expect reference to anything external.

    Beyond referring to the passages as "Passage A" and "Passage B" as you go along, or even just "(A)" and "(B)", there isn't much 'citing' to do.
    Oh, sorry, I didn't mean anything like a full-out bibliography. As in "I think so and so means that blah blah blah as can be seen in 'quote here' (Author name, lines 23-25)".

    I think I overthought this bit--referencing it as "Passage A" and "Passage B" is so much simpler ha ha. Thanks! Puts me at ease. Well, as much ease as you can get about this test ...
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    This book is really interesting and gives you a good solid reminder of all the 'technical' bits that you can throw in for the ELAT, it's called Leading Questions: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Leading-Ques.../dp/0174323379

    I also read George Orwell's wonderful essay Politics and the English Language, which pretty much teaches you how to write well/avoid writing badly

    Although it's tomorrow now so not really a huge amount of point in me posting this...

    =/
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    (Original post by tatsel)
    Aaah! I'm taking the ELAT tomorrow and I don't feel like I'm prepared at all. :eek: I didn't realise until after i did the sample paper that there was so much emphasis on meter and syntax and the such....I'm from Ireland and they don't teach us anything like that here. I feel like I'm at a complete disadvange to everyone else. We usually focus more on the contextual stuff, even in unseen prose and poetry. I've tried teaching myself the basic rules of meter in poetry but I don't want to misuse them and look like an idiot...Advice please!!
    I have the same problem. I'm pretty sure I'll do horribly tomorrow because I have no experience whatsoever when it comes to close reading. I have read a few guides and have been practising quite a bit over the past weeks, but as I never had anyone to look at my work or teach me I'm pretty sure I'm rubbish at it.

    You're a native English speaker though (at least, I'm assuming you are?), and I'm pretty sure you can get an excellent score without discussing meter. Just do what you usually do, and you'll be fine
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    (Original post by tatsel)
    Aaah! I'm taking the ELAT tomorrow and I don't feel like I'm prepared at all. :eek: I didn't realise until after i did the sample paper that there was so much emphasis on meter and syntax and the such....I'm from Ireland and they don't teach us anything like that here. I feel like I'm at a complete disadvange to everyone else. We usually focus more on the contextual stuff, even in unseen prose and poetry. I've tried teaching myself the basic rules of meter in poetry but I don't want to misuse them and look like an idiot...Advice please!!
    As I say in my guide (which you should read if you haven't already), you've already been learning close reading in school or even just reading at home, without you knowing it. Have a look at some resources on the internet tonight, and try not to worry about it.


    (Original post by Proserpine)
    Oh, sorry, I didn't mean anything like a full-out bibliography. As in "I think so and so means that blah blah blah as can be seen in 'quote here' (Author name, lines 23-25)".

    I think I overthought this bit--referencing it as "Passage A" and "Passage B" is so much simpler ha ha. Thanks! Puts me at ease. Well, as much ease as you can get about this test ...
    Ah, I didn't think of line references. Putting those in is a good idea. "(A, lines 23-25)" is perfect, but it doesn't really matter as long as it's clear.


    (Original post by Ambs)
    I have the same problem. I'm pretty sure I'll do horribly tomorrow because I have no experience whatsoever when it comes to close reading. I have read a few guides and have been practising quite a bit over the past weeks, but as I never had anyone to look at my work or teach me I'm pretty sure I'm rubbish at it.

    You're a native English speaker though (at least, I'm assuming you are?), and I'm pretty sure you can get an excellent score without discussing meter. Just do what you usually do, and you'll be fine
    I'm sure you'll be okay. It will become clearer once you have the pieces in front of you and dig into them.
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    As I'm pretty sure I would perform better analysing two poems tomorrow rather than prose, would it be foolish to almost straight away focus on the three poems and decide which two I want to use?

    It seems as though it would save me time if I know that's what I want to do, but i'm worried in having that mindset I might cut off better comparisons which could be made by including the prose pieces. Or is it highly likely, given they do want us to be able to excel after all, that the poems will have good scope for successful comparison anyway?
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    Just going to drop this here for anyone feeling completely unprepared.
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    Good luck everyone!

    What do people think is the most crucial aspect of the application process? Interviews or the ELAT?
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    (Original post by Mirza01)
    Good luck everyone!

    What do people think is the most crucial aspect of the application process? Interviews or the ELAT?
    I have no idea, but I'd be really curious to know the percentage of English applicants they interview. It would be pretty gutting to be screened out based on results in tomorrow's exam. Good luck to you as well.
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    (Original post by darcied)
    I have no idea, but I'd be really curious to know the percentage of English applicants they interview. It would be pretty gutting to be screened out based on results in tomorrow's exam. Good luck to you as well.
    Well I suppose if we can impress them with our written work and personal statements then we may still stand a good chance.

    I'm just worried that, say, for example, two people get interviewed and both perform equally well, but one has better ELAT results. They'd probably offer a place to the latter.

    And they must realise that this is quite an unfair test for applicants who get little help from their schools/haven't done anything of the kind before, so perhaps they'll take that into account too.
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    Done no preparation / have had no help from school! Amazing. Going to bed now, everyone feel better because they have done more than me. WHY am I not bothered?
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    (Original post by elkestocks)
    Done no preparation / have had no help from school! Amazing. Going to bed now, everyone feel better because they have done more than me. WHY am I not bothered?
    if it's any consolation, you might discover an innate close reading ability in the exam tomorrow...
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    (Original post by toml_27)
    As I'm pretty sure I would perform better analysing two poems tomorrow rather than prose, would it be foolish to almost straight away focus on the three poems and decide which two I want to use?

    It seems as though it would save me time if I know that's what I want to do, but i'm worried in having that mindset I might cut off better comparisons which could be made by including the prose pieces. Or is it highly likely, given they do want us to be able to excel after all, that the poems will have good scope for successful comparison anyway?
    I would say that it is best to see what comes up, but then I'm sure you'll do that whatever is said now. For all you know, a prose piece might come up which suits you.

    I only found that today.


    (Original post by elkestocks)
    Done no preparation / have had no help from school! Amazing. Going to bed now, everyone feel better because they have done more than me. WHY am I not bothered?
    You're not bothered because it's going to go just fine and everything will be wonderful.




    Good luck for tomorrow morning, chaps. Let me know how it went.
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    I am terrified I have been told not to both studying at all just look at the specimen paper breath and go. See you on the other side guys! xxx
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    How did everyone find it?!

    I think it went okay. I think I got some good points down but structured it poorly and I ran out of time while I was writing my conclusion (examiner had to take the pen out of my hand just as I put the last full stop!). I'm quite confident in my answer overall though, don't think I got into the top band but hopefully just the one under it.
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    I think it went alright... had so much to say and ran out of time though! I had HUGE paragraphs to begin with then by the end had incy ones on rhythm/rhyme etc I loved the question though Would've loved an extra 1/2hr :/

    Edit- I did the two poems (Auden and Wordsworth)
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    That went terribly, I'm hoping that's only my perception, but really it isn't, I mean, looking back at my answers, it was really poor. What extracts did people do? I did (a) and (c)
 
 
 
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