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Can I Get a Job With English Literature Degree? Watch

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    (Original post by paddy__power)
    Yes of course you can.

    Many jobs do not require a particular degree as a prerequisite for application and an English degree teaches many of the same skills other degrees do and these are what employers look for.

    What many idiots on TSR fail to ecognise is that getting a job is about far more than what degree you did; then again given that they are kids or, at best, uni students for the most part this is not surprising. Just do the best you can, gather skills and experience in the field you want to enter if you can and you have a good chance at any job you meet the requirements for - which will be many with a good English degree.

    So much nonsense will be posted in this thread - always is.
    Thank you for your reply.

    I understand that there are many opportunities out there upon graduating for those with English degrees, however most of them are publishing jobs, or teaching jobs, and these areas aren't really conducive to my own particular strengths. I have an extremely bad temper, for example, so working as a teacher I feel is not ideal. I have been researching publishing jobs, and have noticed that in the vast majority of graduate jobs the salary is approximately 14-16K a year, and I am unsure of the opportunites for career development.

    This sort of research I have been undertaking has led me to consider another career path. Nevertheless thank you for taking the time to reply.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    Let's be honest though mate your aunt obviously has some really worthwhile additional skills to be that high up in a company like that, as the chances are that she has an affinity for organisation, leadership, management and a good work ethic etc to be doing something like that. Good on her though, all the best.
    Whats wrong with having those transferable skills? Anyone with an English degree could have them. I admit my Auntie is super-organised, but she didn't get her foot in the door on that alone, she worked at several different insurance companies/various businesses when she left University at 21 (she's now 47) and has got to the level she has, oh and her degree is a 2:2 from University of Essex. Think she was just lucky that she grew up in a time when less people went to University.
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    (Original post by ragnar_jonsson)
    You could be the Head of Sevenoaks.

    Just saying.
    Indeed.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    Thank you for your reply.

    I understand that there are many opportunities out there upon graduating for those with English degrees, however most of them are publishing jobs, or teaching jobs, and these areas aren't really conducive to my own particular strengths. I have an extremely bad temper, for example, so working as a teacher I feel is not ideal. I have been researching publishing jobs, and have noticed that in the vast majority of graduate jobs the salary is approximately 14-16K a year, and I am unsure of the opportunites for career development.

    This sort of research I have been undertaking has led me to consider another career path. Nevertheless thank you for taking the time to reply.
    You can get into various graduate schemes in business with an English degree, and I know several people who do hiring in big[ish] companies who couldn't care less what degree you have as long as it's a generally academic one.

    Your 'research' may well lead you to go a different way, and that's fine, but it's simply not true that the paths open to you extend only to the jobs that lead on naturally from the degree.

    Best of luck whatever you do though mate.
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    (Original post by FTstudies)
    Whats wrong with having those transferable skills? Anyone with an English degree could have them. I admit my Auntie is super-organised, but she didn't get her foot in the door on that alone, she worked at several different insurance companies/various businesses when she left University at 21 (she's now 47) and has got to the level she has, oh and her degree is a 2:2 from University of Essex. Think she was just lucky that she grew up in a time when less people went to University.
    I was actually going to mention the point about less people going to university at the time your auntie did but I couldn't really be arsed in case someone came on here and started a debate on it or something. There's nothing wrong with having those transferable skills, but I think that your aunt has them naturally and has honed them really well when working after uni. I don't have them naturally, I mean I'm naturally a hard worker but I'm also a bit of an ******** when it comes to working with others and I've got a bad temper, so I don't think that such a route would work for me.

    Well done to your aunt though.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    Thank you for your reply.

    I understand that there are many opportunities out there upon graduating for those with English degrees, however most of them are publishing jobs, or teaching jobs, and these areas aren't really conducive to my own particular strengths. I have an extremely bad temper, for example, so working as a teacher I feel is not ideal. I have been researching publishing jobs, and have noticed that in the vast majority of graduate jobs the salary is approximately 14-16K a year, and I am unsure of the opportunites for career development.

    This sort of research I have been undertaking has led me to consider another career path. Nevertheless thank you for taking the time to reply.

    What do you expect to do with a science degree? I'm just curious.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    I was actually going to mention the point about less people going to university at the time your auntie did but I couldn't really be arsed in case someone came on here and started a debate on it or something. There's nothing wrong with having those transferable skills, but I think that your aunt has them naturally and has honed them really well when working after uni. I don't have them naturally, I mean I'm naturally a hard worker but I'm also a bit of an ******** when it comes to working with others and I've got a bad temper, so I don't think that such a route would work for me.

    Well done to your aunt though.
    Ah well fair enough. It's good you're thinking about the future though, I mean I know one of friends is doing Media & Society at University, and well.. the chances of them getting into the media industry on that is slim, a Film/TV Production degree would give them a much better chance. Oh well, I guess teaching is the 'fall back' profession for most people.

    I myself am doing English Language, and I have no idea what I want to do at the moment! I've considered things from Teaching, to Journalism, to a job in the BBC... in a way the possibilities are endless, on the other hand, you're likely to be pushed out by those with a degree more focused to a career path you may want to go down. Though as you mentioned, I myself can't imagine being a teacher.. I hate kids for one.
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    Pretty useless degree tbh.
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    (Original post by milesofsea)
    What do you expect to do with a science degree? I'm just curious.
    With a degree in science, hopefully I will go into healthcare or medicine, something along that route.

    I just want to make this absolutely clear though, I am in no way ridiculing English Literature as a degree or those who are doing it. What I am getting at is that my strengths are specifically in creative writing and not necessarily the study of English Literature, which I am aware that you are doing, and probably doing a damn sight better than I am able to. Therefore, you are in a much better position than me to actually get a job from an english literature degree than me, which is why I am considering a science degree.

    All the best.
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    (Original post by JayDay92)
    I've been in a very similar position for a while now. At GCSE stage, creative writing was my main interest, even though I performed equally well in science and maths. I ended up doing chemistry, biology, english lit and philosophy for AS-level as those subjects could keep my options pretty much as wide open as possible. My goal was always to continue doing english lit at a good university (mainly UCL) so that if, in the future, I decide not to write a book but instead to pursue a career in Law or Journalism etc, I could do an easy transition from my english degree.

    Recently I've come to the realisation that even though this is a solid plan, I didn't want to spend 3 years of my life doing a degree while I'm not entirely sure that it's what I want to commit my life to. Instead, I've chosen to apply to study Politics. It's always been a great interest of mine and would provide greater employment prospects than English. This way, I can still write, but without the pressure of having nothing to fall back on. So, I'm aiming to pursue a career in politics while still leaving room to eventually publish a book or two. I'm now completely convinced that this is a better plan and glad I've figured it out sooner rather than later.

    I know this kind of ended up as me babbling about myself but I hope it helped.
    Thanks for replying

    Not to worry about the babbling, at least you had the resolve to actually make the decision. I didn't, and now I've resorted to making threads on here to discuss my problems like a right loser. Best of luck with your career in politics.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    Thank you for your reply.

    I understand that there are many opportunities out there upon graduating for those with English degrees, however most of them are publishing jobs, or teaching jobs, and these areas aren't really conducive to my own particular strengths. I have an extremely bad temper, for example, so working as a teacher I feel is not ideal. I have been researching publishing jobs, and have noticed that in the vast majority of graduate jobs the salary is approximately 14-16K a year, and I am unsure of the opportunites for career development.

    This sort of research I have been undertaking has led me to consider another career path. Nevertheless thank you for taking the time to reply.
    Not quite... the average starting salary was 17.3k in 2008.
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    Not quite... the average starting salary was 17.3k in 2008.
    Thank you for the reply.

    The job listings I've been looking at are primarily 14-16K. Even if I was earning 17.3K or thereabouts, that's not enough to sway me, although I can appreciate that for someone who is quite passionate upon that sort of job upon graduating that this would be quite a good opportunity, and I respect that. It is not for me however.

    All the best.
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    (Original post by Fat-Love)
    Writing a book is one of those things you can genuinely do without actually having studied English as most of the modules of the courses are irrelevant to creative writing. If writing really is your strength perhaps taking specific modules that could hone this strength through the open university or do a different degree and hone your writing skills in your spare time? You'd be killling two birds with one stone this way as your other degree could help you get a job more easily which will provide a stable income as you write.
    I think the second option is perhaps the most viable one, as I think that it's best for me to look for stability and at least a fair degree of security with regards to employment prospects. The reality of the situation is that I am most likely not good enough to be a witer for a career, so it's more likely to become a hobby, as opposed to being a career.
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    Someone I know wants to be an author but he's doing a History degree :dontknow: Just make sure that you enjoy what you study.

    I'm doing English Language because I absolutely love it I want to be a primary school teacher (hence Education studies as a minor).
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    With a degree in science, hopefully I will go into healthcare or medicine, something along that route.

    I just want to make this absolutely clear though, I am in no way ridiculing English Literature as a degree or those who are doing it. What I am getting at is that my strengths are specifically in creative writing and not necessarily the study of English Literature, which I am aware that you are doing, and probably doing a damn sight better than I am able to. Therefore, you are in a much better position than me to actually get a job from an english literature degree than me, which is why I am considering a science degree.

    All the best.

    I didn't take it personally, don't worry. I would just think long and hard about entering healthcare, especially as you say you have a 'bad temper', you'll be pushed to your limits with some of the regulars you get in hospitals and the standard 'I pay your wages you ******!#@' followed by doctor being sent off for countless 'communication skills' courses. It's not half as glamorous as it sounds.

    And I would also point out that to balance a really really demanding medical career with spurts of creative writing that really fulfill your potential and produce the best, most well informed and well rounded, fluid and imaginative written material would be difficult. To tap into the logical and creative aspects of your mind and succeed in both equally to the best of your ability is impossible. The compromise will have to be in one or the other, and I'd wager that the publishing market is tougher than the academic requirements for passing a science degree.

    So really think about your priorities, and consider all the aspects of a medical career, the nasty as well as the nice. Talking to doctors would be a start, and work shadowing. I'm not trying to put you off the scientific route (though if it's for employment purposes, I'd forget doing something like straight biology, far more biology grads end up doing non-scientific jobs like shop management as english grads end up unemployed), I merely think that you're overestimating the extent to which a science degree would solve your employment worries.
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    (Original post by onthejubileeline)
    Believe me, I can relate. Those were my strengths while I was at school, and in the end I decided that University wasn't for me and I work instead. I think even if you did plan on being a published author, you'd almost certainly have to have another job on the side to keep yourself going while you write.
    And normally after you've been published as well. Most authors don't make their living from writing. To make a basic living you need to sell about 50,000 books. The average novel sells around 7000 copies. Only about 5-10% of published authors make their living primarily from writing.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    Thanks for replying

    Not to worry about the babbling, at least you had the resolve to actually make the decision. I didn't, and now I've resorted to making threads on here to discuss my problems like a right loser. Best of luck with your career in politics.
    Thankyou And I'm sure you'll figure it out, after all, you seem to care enough about finding out what it is you really want. Good Luck!
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    Someone I know wants to be an author but he's doing a History degree :dontknow: Just make sure that you enjoy what you study.

    I'm doing English Language because I absolutely love it I want to be a primary school teacher (hence Education studies as a minor).
    Well done to you, if you get a first or upper second class degree then you definitely stand a grat chance of getting a job, not to mention the fact that you're doing something you love. Then again, maybe your friend loves history? Just a thought, lol.

    All the best with your degree.
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    Put it this way, you'd probably be able to teach English, at least, in almost any country of your choosing, how about that for job prospects! The world is a growing market, just coz we in Europe are reaching a market and public sector saturation level, doesn't mean its the same for everyone else on the planet. Why not share your English talents with others who really REALLY want/need to learn English and will pay you top dollar to!?!
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    (Original post by dav'd's_day)
    Put it this way, you'd probably be able to teach English, at least, in almost any country of your choosing, how about that for job prospects! The world is a growing market, just coz we in Europe are reaching a market and public sector saturation level, doesn't mean its the same for everyone else on the planet. Why not share your English talents with others who really REALLY want/need to learn English and will pay you top dollar to!?!
    This is perhaps the most pertinent way in which to utilise an English degree with regards to gaining employment. The most obvious obstacle I believe would be that I am not particularly good with languages. A language could be brought to a good enough standard over 3 or 4 years though.

    Good point mate. Nice one.
 
 
 
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