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Employment Prospects Listed by Degree watch

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    The original article can be found here:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/ed...ee-813783.html

    I didn't originally write the article, so I'm not claiming that I wrote this or anything like that, but here are the degrees listed below, with the amployment prospects listed as a percentage next to them:

    Dentistry 83%.
    Medicine 87%.
    Pharmacology & Pharmacy 68%.
    Architecture 56%.
    Civil Engineering 72%.
    Chemical Engineering 59%.
    Town and Country Planning & Landscape 48%.
    Chemistry 34%.
    Mechanical Engineering 59%.
    Social Work 65%.
    Celtic Studies 29%.
    General Engineering 53%.
    Physics & Astronomy 29%.
    Mathematics 34%.
    Law 20%.
    Economics 42%.
    Aeronautical & Manufacturing Engineering 49%.
    Electrical & Electronic Engineering 51%.
    East & South Asian Studies 45%.
    French 40%.
    Anatomy & Physiology 25%.
    Computer Science 52%.
    Middle Eastern & African Studies 36%.
    Iberian Languages 42%.
    Materials Technology 42%.
    Biological Sciences 28%.
    Italian 41%.
    Geography 34%.
    Russian 38%.
    Business Studies 46%.
    English 29%.
    Archaeology 32%.
    Anthropology 31%.
    Psychology 29%.
    American Studies 32%.
    Sociology 30%.

    The article was published in 2008. I'm not saying you have to take the percentages as being completely accurate beyond question, but I think they make for fairly alarming reading.
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    Yeah, because a degree in celtic studies is really better than a degree in law :/
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    Percentage doing what? Going into a graduate level job? After what time period? Account for a lot of scientists doing further research? .....
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    (Original post by CJN)
    Yeah, because a degree in celtic studies is really better than a degree in law :/
    I wondered that myself, I couldn't believe that law had such a low percentage. Remember though, I cannot validate the complete accuracy of the figures published here, I merely posted them here as a means of discussion, and to maybe stimulate debate with regards to what people want to do at university.
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    (Original post by Dnator)
    Percentage doing what? Going into a graduate level job? After what time period? Account for a lot of scientists doing further research? .....
    I don't believe the timeframe was stated in the original article. The percentage I believe relates to the overall percentage of graduates from each degree being employed in a job which relates to their degree, or a job which their degree has contributed to them attaining. If they are employed for research purposes, I imagine that yes, this would be factored into the figures shown in the article.
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    Veterinary science should be at the top, it has >90% employment rate
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    (Original post by Annaconda)
    Veterinary science should be at the top, it has >90% employment rate
    Veterinary science was not listed in the original article, I don't believe, neither were subjects such as art and design, for example. However, I do not doubt that the employment rate for veterinary science is very high, as it is a very difficult subject to gain entry to at university, and it is also a very well regarded profession. Congratulations on studying it at Bristol.

    All the best.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    I don't believe the timeframe was stated in the original article. The percentage I believe relates to the overall percentage of graduates from each degree being employed in a job which relates to their degree, or a job which their degree has contributed to them attaining. If they are employed for research purposes, I imagine that yes, this would be factored into the figures shown in the article.
    So apparently two thirds of all chemistry graduates are unemployed or in a menial job? :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Dnator)
    So apparently two thirds of all chemistry graduates are unemployed or in a menial job? :rolleyes:
    Apparently so, or perhaps they are in jobs that don't directly relate to their degree? Then again, I wouldn't no, as I didn't write the article, I pasted the list from the article which can be seen in the link at the top of the page.
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    (Original post by Dnator)
    So apparently two thirds of all chemistry graduates are unemployed or in a menial job? :rolleyes:
    They instinctively know not to mix ammonia and bleach when scrubbing out the toilets of their investment banking and business consulting superiors.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    They instinctively know not to mix ammonia and bleach when scrubbing out the toilets of their investment banking and business consulting superiors.
    Easy now.
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    (Original post by Dnator)
    So apparently two thirds of all chemistry graduates are unemployed or in a menial job? :rolleyes:
    my brother did chemistry and a masters, started a phD and then changed his mind and became a primary school teacher so i guess he counts in that percentage
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    (Original post by *absinthe*)
    my brother did chemistry and a masters, started a phD and then changed his mind and became a primary school teacher so i guess he counts in that percentage
    Your brother's obviously doing something that he enjoys then, good for him.
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    HESA stats
    http://www.hesa.ac.uk/dox/performanc...9/se1_0809.xls in excel format.

    Medicine, Dentistry and Vetinary Science doing well here - pesumably graduates in these subjects are accustomed to wearing rubber gloves :rolleyes:

    So no indication what the Independent's table is actually claiming to tell us or how subjects were selected for inclusion (celtic studies I'm looking at you), fantastic :top:
    I wouldn't place too much trust in that list.
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    (Original post by andrew1990)
    I wondered that myself, I couldn't believe that law had such a low percentage. Remember though, I cannot validate the complete accuracy of the figures published here, I merely posted them here as a means of discussion, and to maybe stimulate debate with regards to what people want to do at university.
    I read recently that only 30% of law students find work in practicing law, can't recall where but that might be why it scores low?
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    It appears that Law graduate may one day become synonymous with Tesco-worker. The statistics are frankly a little dubious.
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    What the ****? Law 20%? - this somewhat scares me.
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    Thats because there are too many law grads for law jobs, has been for a while.....
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    Don't law grads have to do more training before they can practise law? That would explain why its so low.
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    Thing is though, a lot of those degrees will lead you into another area of work, or study. So say for expample Geography being at 34%, that could be bacause graduates go into different professions, like finance/planning/politics etc. and not just a Geography related job.

    Same goes for pretty much the whole list, so I wouldn't use it to judge if you're going to be unemployed or not after your chosen degree.
 
 
 
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