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Professor fined £155 for disembarking one train stop early watch

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    We're in Britain, your average member of staff is going to be useless, lazy and stupid.

    Regardless, as far as I know he just went to the papers so that it embarrassed the company and he was let off the fine as a 'gesture of good will'. Mission accomplished~
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    I don't care that he is a professor.
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    Daily Mail... Lets see if they're blaming it on immigrants in the comments.
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    (Original post by n00)
    Well they can waste their time and money in small claims court if they like but there is no way a small claims court would find both the T&C to be fair and the fine to be proportionate.
    You have agreed to the T&C by purchasing the ticket. You may not like it but they are enforceable.

    (Original post by Mr. Orange)
    Ok going from Cardiff Central to Paddington leaving tomorrow at 11.55 would cost me £27.50

    Whereas getting on at a stop further down the line on the same train at Didcot Parkway would cost me £19.90 to get to London. It's all about distance.
    Not always, most of the time on a given route yes but some commuter trains are not. Sam way that splitting tickets. If I buy from home to plymouth then plymouth to london tickets can be cheaper than home- london despite sitting on the same train the whole time!

    See below.

    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    Indeed.

    Case in point is my 2-stage journey to Leicester from Kent. One stage is on the new high speed line to St. Pancras, and if bought separately costs me about £40. It's about 60 miles, but because of the high cost of operating the route, and the extremely high demand at every time of day for seats on HS trains, ticket prices are expensive even for a super off-peak single with a rail card.

    The next stage is from London St. Pancras to Leicester. It's about 130 miles, but it's not a very commonly taken route as Leicester is a small city and not a major destination compared to other places on the mainline. It typically costs me about £20 for an off-peak ticket with a rail-card.

    Longer distances do not denote higher fare prices. It depends entirely on the route.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    You have agreed to the T&C by purchasing the ticket. You may not like it but they are enforceable.
    Rubbish. T&Cs are only enforceable if they are fair and any fines are proportionate.
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    (Original post by n00)
    Rubbish. T&Cs are only enforceable if they are fair and any fines are proportionate.
    Which they are.

    Fine is £20 or 2x the cost of the journey for purchased ticket. Totally fair, totally enforceable.
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    Forget the legality of the situation, it's amazingly silly that he should have to pay the full price of the ticket for getting off early.

    Anyway, they can't keep him trapped in the train station - so if I was him I would wait for a court date (which would never happen because that will cost the money grabbing train line even more).
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Which they are.

    Fine is £20 or 2x the cost of the journey for purchased ticket. Totally fair, totally enforceable.
    Yes, in theory. But when the issue is money, what train line will take you to court? If you assaulted a member of their staff, perhaps they might justify the cost, but for £150 when they know they're morally wrong - I think it's unlikely. Bad publicity is not what they want.
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    Well, you pay for the station not the distance.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Which they are.

    Fine is £20 or 2x the cost of the journey for purchased ticket. Totally fair, totally enforceable.
    There is absolutely no way that £155 is a proportionate fine for getting off early. Besides which he could just have claimed to be travel sick.
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    (Original post by Aack)
    Yes, in theory. But when the issue is money, what train line will take you to court? If you assaulted a member of their staff, perhaps they might justify the cost, but for £150 when they know they're morally wrong - I think it's unlikely. Bad publicity is not what they want.
    Oh it isn't overly likely, but is certainly possible and I imagine would be done if they had more and more people refusing to pay them.

    (Original post by n00)
    There is absolutely no way that £155 is a proportionate fine for getting off early. Besides which he could just have claimed to be travel sick.
    Because you say so?
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    All train tickets I Get say to get to your destination by ANY route. does that not mean I could get off at any station between 2 destination to go to another station and get on a train there?
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    (Original post by Aack)
    Anyway, they can't keep him trapped in the train station - so if I was him I would wait for a court date (which would never happen because that will cost the money grabbing train line even more).
    He's already been told that the fine has been waived as a "gesture of goodwill" with East Coast admitting it was their mistake.

    This has been reported in every other news source but not the Daily Mail for some reason.....
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    (Original post by BenJi man)
    All train tickets I Get say to get to your destination by ANY route. does that not mean I could get off at any station between 2 destination to go to another station and get on a train there?
    Advance tickets are not normal train tickets, they specify a route and time that must be fulfilled for the ticket to be valid.

    As for changing route with a normal ticket, it's allowed as long as you don't break your journey. Essentially, you can only change the route if it doesn't involve going through ticket barriers.
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    Indeed.

    Case in point is my 2-stage journey to Leicester from Kent. One stage is on the new high speed line to St. Pancras, and if bought separately costs me about £40. It's about 60 miles, but because of the high cost of operating the route, and the extremely high demand at every time of day for seats on HS trains, ticket prices are expensive even for a super off-peak single with a rail card.

    The next stage is from London St. Pancras to Leicester. It's about 130 miles, but it's not a very commonly taken route as Leicester is a small city and not a major destination compared to other places on the mainline. It typically costs me about £20 for an off-peak ticket with a rail-card.

    Longer distances do not denote higher fare prices. It depends entirely on the route.
    I don't think that's a very good example - it seems to me you're paying a higher price for a special high-speed train, rather than because of those particular destinations.
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    I ******* hate the train companies and their employees in this country.


    Shame, because trains SHOULD be such a brilliant way to travel.
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    (Original post by Jelkin)
    I don't think that's a very good example - it seems to me you're paying a higher price for a special high-speed train, rather than because of those particular destinations.
    Point taken, but the same is true to a lesser extent if I were to make a three stage journey from Ashford to London Charing Cross on a normal commuter train, London Charing Cross to St. Pancras on the Tube, and then London St. Pancras to Leicester on the Midland Mainline. The shorter journey from Ashford to London Charing Cross still costs me more than the much longer (distance-wise) journey from London St. Pancras to Leicester.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Because you say so?
    They would need to prove his actions caused them to be in the region of £155 out of pocket. They clearly didn't.
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    (Original post by theciz)
    A similar thing happened to me and a friend trying to get to the airport from the main train station in Barcelona. Got off at the wrong stop, went through the barriers only to realise we had to go back that way to get to the right stop. Barriers wouldn't accept our tickets. Asked one of the guards, showed him our tickets and he let us through, telling us the correct platform. You can have as sophisticated technology as you like, but nothing beats human common sense. Makes me glad Translink train tickets back home have "travel until x station" on them.
    Which station was it? Afaik, tickets in Rodalies go for Zones, not stations (whenever I go or get back from the airport I use my T-10, doing a connection in Barcelona to my town, last time on Sunday, and it worked).
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    (Original post by Aack)
    Yes, in theory. But when the issue is money, what train line will take you to court? If you assaulted a member of their staff, perhaps they might justify the cost, but for £150 when they know they're morally wrong - I think it's unlikely. Bad publicity is not what they want.
    What's morality got to do with it? They're a private business (or a PPP or whatever). That means they naturally will use revenue management if possible. It's not in their financial interests to permit people to get off the train early, like this professor did, and so they will prevent him from doing so.
 
 
 
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