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    Crazy thread lol
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    Lol; I joined just to comment on this thread!

    Planning certainly is going through some turmoil at the mo; in the 2 years since I've left study I've only had 1 interview; that position went to a candidate with 5 years experience.

    There is definitely hope out there, but it comes from having to actively pursue voluntary work, or seeking unpaid work placements in order to get the necessary experience. I'd say the best bet at the moment is to prepare for the changes the planned localism bill will bring (i.e. more community based planning) and be prepared to orientate yourself towards that. And keep your knowledge up to date! Post uni, and if you're still wanting to get into town planning have a look at wildlife trusts, that sort of thing; ideal since they'll always want someone willing to put their views across in a technical manner

    Besides, there are plenty of other skills town planning can relate to; such as general policy, regeneration research etc. Personally, the future for anyone doing town planning is to be prepared to look to diversify with their core skills!
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    I'm on my first year of a masters in planning. Even our lecturer tells us there's no jobs. But at the end of the day, being pessimistic is going to do you no favours. I'd rather be optimistic about the future, and have a half expectancy to be disappointed at the end of my degree than spend the next four years completely miserable.

    And at least I'll have some transferable/diverse skills, and still a master's degree to my name, perhaps if the sector doesn't improve I can buy more time with a PhD lol

    People talk here as if planning is the only dead-end degree, when practically anyone who's not a doctor/engineer/lawyer is just as screwed as I'm going to be in four years time.

    Screw it, I'll go abroad, or get a completely unrelated job like most graduates do, or just work my way up some company. I'm not picky, as long as I'm living on a half-decent wage and have some level of job satisfaction, I'll be happy, but hell, even that's asking a lot these days...
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    Sup guys,
    Im currently at A2 nw hoping to start uni this septmber.
    I have recently applied to UWE for town and country planning, I absolutely have no idea of what the course structure would be and what sorts of stuffs would I be learning and blah blah.. since most of the users here is like doing Masters' or experienced would you mind to give me some ideas of this course I tried looking into the web but no luck on getting what this course is really about.. I know i should have looked into it before i applied, but choosing this course was sort of erratic decisions.

    and BTW why is Town planning course seem to be going down hill?.., plenty of new houses, companies such as David Wilsons and other one- Taylor Wimpey or sumtin seems to be covering most of the empty areas with their new houses which stretch out for miles, i dont see where town planner or architects wont be able to get jobs in places or companies like these.........

    a discussion would be muchly appreciated.
    thnx

    (p.s :: my parents had bought a new house from David Wilson--in june 2010)
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    I think perhaps 3-4 years down the line the housing market should be back on its feet, but the Tories' 'localism' agenda in planning policy threatens to hand too much power to NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) neighbours who will want to block anything proposed to be built near them...
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    Positively agrees
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    I 'completely' agree with the OP. I was sold the same 'bull-****' line about there being 'thousands of planning jobs out there' and councils and the private sector 'are falling over themselves' to employ/recruit town planners. Even the head of RTPI was spurting a similar piece of nonsense in 2007. Complete and utter 'bullocks' just another bull-**** sales tactic.

    The reality! Can't even get a job interview. What a waste of my life and how I so look forward to repaying all the lovely debt I've accumulated, which I'll probably pay off through employment not associated with my degree.

    Someone did mentioned, something about volunteering and how the market will pick-up in 2015! well that's all fine and dandy, if you have a family to support you (still living at home or something) but not much help, If you have bills etc to pay in 2011.

    The only planning jobs these university courses create: are for the lecturers themselves.

    Seriously: AVOID or change degree path (even more so, because fees are going-up). Just do something more useful instead, in fact be wary of most social science/art type university courses, rmember 'they' want your fees!
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    (Original post by Agent_Smith01)
    Seriously: AVOID or change degree path (even more so, because fees are going-up). Just do something more useful instead, in fact be wary of most social science/art type university courses, rmember 'they' want your fees!
    very true... my dealings with oxford brookes today reminded me how much of a business education has become.... trying to get my part 2 log sheets signed off, was told that because i wasn't going there any more (owing to the timing of their exams) they wouldn't be signing any more of my sheets. I had to politely remind them I had paid £130 for them to sign my sheets regardless of where I ended up doing my Part 3. UK academia is just ££££££ for as little work and good will as possible now. Its a gravy train and you really want to get off of it.
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    My feelings also! Further education (in the past) was meant to provide people with the written/verbal communication skills, for business and for the economy (in general) where as now! the further education system is in 'fact' now a business model and apart of the larger economy.

    Dealing with universities isn't that much different than buying a second-hand car or having a double glazing salesman at your front door. Except double glazing/car are useful and better value for my money (in most cases).

    Another interesting theory about further education in the UK! the UK's youth unemployment is lower than some other European countries, (even if it is 'really' high) this is probably because: nearly 50 percent of youths over the age of 18 are at university and aren't seeking (FT) employment. I bet that saves the govn a few bob in unemployment benefits. So anyone at university is: affectively paying for their own unemployment and training benefits, through the student loan system.


    I recommend the following documentary, it's about the USA education system. I can see many similarities with the UK's further education system.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpZtX32sKVE
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    Ok, I know it's bad at the moment folks but...in a few years time I predict that many senior planners will be retiring in a wave. The need for govenrment cuts has meant that many are taking voluntary early retirement. Things will pick up in a few years once the banks have balanced their books. Current planners will then all step up leaving plenty of graduate entry/ junior planner posts.

    So what do you do in the meantime? Masters in specialist areas such as conservation or urban design or may be surveying. Then there's voluntary work experience. But yes it may mean a lengthy period without any real work.
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    (Original post by Nitebot)
    Ok, I know it's bad at the moment folks but...in a few years time I predict that many senior planners will be retiring in a wave. The need for govenrment cuts has meant that many are taking voluntary early retirement. Things will pick up in a few years once the banks have balanced their books. Current planners will then all step up leaving plenty of graduate entry/ junior planner posts.
    I work in a local authority and what you say is true - so many people in their 50s/60s have retired or are due to retire in huge amounts. The problem is that funding pressures on a lot of councils are so tight (not helped by the Tories' plan to freeze council tax) that there is a recruitment freeze on all but the most essential positions. In addition, planning departments rely on planning fees as a source of income, and fees are way down in the past few years because of the economic downturn.

    I can see a few staff being taken on, but the teams will be a lot leaner in terms of numbers than they used to be.
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    Yes I agree with you too Dan. The jobs will come but I appreciate that for people like Agent Smith who need work now it's going to be difficult. Even when the market recovers there's likely to be more graduate town planners kicking around than planning jobs. But one of the great things about planning is that it is a flexible profession and you could use your knowledge in other areas such as property management, transport, countryside etc. But I think people may need to specialise more. Planning on its own won't make you stand out.
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    Guys I understand everyone is trying to be positive and constructive in relation to employment in the planning field BUT the fact remains: there isn't any employment opportunities now and there isn't likely to be any for a considerable time.

    I've heard about all these planners who are supposable retiring from the horse's mouth (RTPI President) in 2006 or 2007. It sounded like bull then and it is bull now!! Of course this isn't unique to planning, as this type of wishful thinking and reassurance from vested interests is quite common throughout university land!!!

    Someone mentioned something about the new planning 'thingie' in England and Wales! well you don't actually sound like your knowledgeable in planning because: it's all 'smoke and mirrors', just more political posturing nonsense. The changes to 'General Permitted Development' were far more reaching, in my opinion.

    Regardless if it's a degree in planning or not! Do people REALLY want to get themselves in 30k+ debt, to be flipping burgers or filling shelves?

    Remember a degree is suppose to be an investment
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    I 'completely' agree with the OP. I was sold the same 'bull-****' line about there being 'thousands of planning jobs out there' and councils and the private sector 'are falling over themselves' to employ/recruit town planners. Even the head of RTPI was spurting a similar piece of nonsense in 2007. Complete and utter 'bullocks' just another bull-**** sales tactic.

    The reality! Can't even get a job interview. What a waste of my life and how I so look forward to repaying all the lovely debt I've accumulated, which I'll probably pay off through employment not associated with my degree.

    Someone did mentioned, something about volunteering and how the market will pick-up in 2015! well that's all fine and dandy, if you have a family to support you (still living at home or something) but not much help, If you have bills etc to pay in 2011.

    The only planning jobs these university courses create: are for the lecturers themselves.

    Seriously: AVOID or change degree path (even more so, because fees are going-up). Just do something more useful instead, in fact be wary of most social science/art type university courses, rmember 'they' want your fees!
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    when i was younger i was lied to at the open days by the lecturers trying to market their course so they can keep they job. i was also told the crap that there are loads of job in the public and private sector. also they made out the course was so interesting however once on the my course it was very different to how they portrayed it.

    my biggest moan really is how the lecturers and other university staff lie to people at such a young age when they have just left college with little life experience. how can they live with they selfs knowing the true facts and the extent of debt that people will get them selfs into with no future means of paying it off.

    mt advice is dont do it, do a proper subject eg. medcine, dentistry, teaching, engineering, im currently at UWE on the 4th yr of the mplan course and when now university staff lie and say there are private n public sector jobs, i agree and just to keep the piece. also if u get the chance like on my course to specialise in the final year DONT do straight planning try to incorporate it with transport or urban design which is likely to give u a better chance of infinding work as a transport planner or architectural assistant (saying that there are v.limited no of urban design jobs too). its blairs fault with his big ideas.
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    (Original post by jrhartley)
    obviously this rant is equally true for architecture, if not more so, as you run up even more debt studying architecture and you are even more brainwashed into being taught about being artistic and creative, when really they would be serving you better by making sure you were the don at microstation 3d, rhino, maya and studiomax.

    such is the detachment of our H-E universities that they recently sent out a questionnaire to recently graduated fifth years asking how they were enjoying their work and how had their studies helped them in the workplace....
    I have a really sad story. I went into Cash Converters one day to buy a used Blackberry. I got chatting to the guy at the till who then told me that he has a degree in architecture.
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    (Original post by dont do planning)
    also if u get the chance like on my course to specialise in the final year DONT do straight planning try to incorporate it with transport or urban design which is likely to give u a better chance of infinding work as a transport planner or architectural assistant (saying that there are v.limited no of urban design jobs too). its blairs fault with his big ideas.
    I agree that there are good opportunities in transport planning at the moment. A lot of money is being pumped into sustainable transport schemes. I'd get familiar with the field of integrated transport solutions. There's a lot of demand for that area of expertise.
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    It's just the way life is at the moment though isn't it? Having a good degree isn't enough anymore, you need to have passion and experience, you need to find something to make you stand out from the crowd. Most of all you have to be willing to be flexible.
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    (Original post by EssexDan86)
    planning consultancy is the way forward. Private sector bobuses and all that.
    What companies are there? Deloitte one of them I know of.

    (Original post by River85)
    Personally I think law graduates are more screwed than town planners in the current climate :p: What the OP says about job prospects can easily be said for most degrees with some exceptions (certain areas of engineering, for example)..
    It is true that the job market is **** at the moment. But law graduates are more screwed than planners...? I doubt that.

    Uni students should be informed of the career prospects before choosing our subject to study for at least 3 years! Before starting architecture, I was warned about the **** state of being an architect, but I was also warned that it's the same in any other subject.
    But this is just not true. It is a fact, not a speculation, that the average salary for architects, planners, is lower than lawyer, bankers, whatever. Some people earn way less than others upon graduation at university, simply because of their subject.
    We have to realise that this is a career for people with the passion, interest (and trust fund), not for people who want to earn a decent salary, in a rewarding work place (at least for your first year out)

    (Original post by peter12345)
    I have a really sad story. I went into Cash Converters one day to buy a used Blackberry. I got chatting to the guy at the till who then told me that he has a degree in architecture.
    this is quality
 
 
 
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