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    I would like to study economics, but I don't have an undergraduate degree in the social sciences. Are there any Master's programmes for non-economists?

    I know there are diplomas, but I don't want to study two years. I am thinking of whether I should:

    a) apply for political science, political economy, development studies or something similar and put the emphasis on economics
    b) do some economics modules while I'm in undergrad
    c) find an economics degree that doesn't require an econ BSc (haven't found any until now)
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    (Original post by continue)
    I would like to study economics, but I don't have an undergraduate degree in the social sciences. Are there any Master's programmes for non-economists?

    I know there are diplomas, but I don't want to study two years. I am thinking of whether I should:

    a) apply for political science, political economy, development studies or something similar and put the emphasis on economics
    b) do some economics modules while I'm in undergrad
    c) find an economics degree that doesn't require an econ BSc (haven't found any until now)
    I may have a solution for you! I'm just finishing a summer session Economics course at York. After which you can go onto a number of different Economics MSc's or an MA in the subject. The course is around £1000 tuition, and the MSc's are around £4000, so it's pretty good value for money. You can find all the info about it and the MSc's on their economics dept site. As far as I know it's the only place around that lets you do this, all else want a year spent on the Diploma programmes.
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    There is a reason why you have the Diploma in economics.

    OP what subject are you doing at undergraduate level?
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    I have a German Master's degree in media and now I want to complement that with politics or economics, preferably the latter.
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    Yea no way you are doing that.

    Any master in economics of even the slightest standard will require you do do maths and economics using maths. So unless you did Master in Media after having done undergrad in something quantitative, there is no way you will get a one year master for economics. In fact, most Diplomas require you to have sufficient knowledge of maths at undergrad to start it.

    Also, even if you managed to get on, think about how much you want to do it and if you think you can cope with the maths. You might be better off doing politics and choosing some economics modules.
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    (Original post by continue)
    I have a German Master's degree in media and now I want to complement that with politics or economics, preferably the latter.
    To be honest have a look at what I said before. I'm taking an MA in PPE with focus on Economics (mainly) and Politics at York, as apposed to one of the MSc courses. To be honest with the summer session, there were some people on it without A-level maths and they managed to complete it. The good thing about the MA is that you can make it as quantitative or qualitative as you like with your options.
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    Thanks for the hint towards York: How is the PPE Masters there? I was looking into that, York being one of the few to offer a Masters in PPE.

    My interest is politics (PolSci, PPE, Public Policy etc.), but I prefer to have a Master's with quantitative rigor. I'm very good in maths, so I won't have a problem with that. The problem is really just the gatekeeping.

    An economics professor at one of UK's top 5 is currently at our university and I took some of his courses. He's gonna write the references for me. Won't that help? He said I won't have problems with economics, but I'll definitely have a lot of catching up to do.

    Are there any courses along politics that have a strong quantitative emphasis?
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    (Original post by continue)
    Are there any courses along politics that have a strong quantitative emphasis?
    International Political Economy (IPE) in some universities may take a quantitative approach. Others though like Cambridge, have told IPE students that Economists don't do as well as you'd expect because of the nature of qualitative analysis intermixed. So you'd have to do some searching.

    Quantitative of course does not have just be in economics courses. An MPhil friend that did International Relations at Oxford's Department of Politics and IR has lamented that Ox is obsessed with its general research statistics modules (multivariate analysis, Linear Regressions type things) and they are quite challenging. Essex is known for being strikingly quantitative in its approach to politics compared to other universities; though probably more focused on the sort of methods you'd find in data-intensive comparative studies, electoral studies, or game-theory type models. They have a famous methods summer school called the "Essex Summer School of Social Science Data Analysis". Personally I think it's as advanced quantitatively as you can get in Politics, outside of the US departments.
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    International Political Economy (IPE) in some universities may take a quantitative approach. Others though like Cambridge, have told IPE students that Economists don't do as well as you'd expect because of the nature of qualitative analysis intermixed. So you'd have to do some searching.

    Quantitative of course does not have just be in economics courses. An MPhil friend that did International Relations at Oxford's Department of Politics and IR has lamented that Ox is obsessed with its general research statistics modules (multivariate analysis, Linear Regressions type things) and they are quite challenging. Essex is known for being strikingly quantitative in its approach to politics compared to other universities; though probably more focused on the sort of methods you'd find in data-intensive comparative studies, electoral studies, or game-theory type models. They have a famous methods summer school called the "Essex Summer School of Social Science Data Analysis". Personally I think it's as advanced quantitatively as you can get in Politics, outside of the US departments.
    Including the continent?
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    Cambridge have told IPE students that Economists don't do as well as you'd expect [...] Ox is obsessed with its general research statistics modules
    My media Master degree is German and I graduated first class, though non-UK grades seem to have a bad reputation. Do you think I have a chance of getting into the top tier like LSE or Cambridge?
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    (Original post by continue)
    My media Master degree is German and I graduated first class, though non-UK grades seem to have a bad reputation. Do you think I have a chance of getting into the top tier like LSE or Cambridge?
    Not for straight economics (given the information you have given us).

    What did you do at undergraduate? (Or did you do a Media Diplom?).

    In fact, if you did not do a quantitative subject before the Master in Media, you would not even get onto the Diploma at LSE. And there is no chance you will get to do a MSc Economics at any of the top institutions, if you have no prior knowledge of economics at university level.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Not for straight economics (given the information you have given us). What did you do at undergraduate? (Or did you do a Media Diplom?).
    No, I want to apply for politics at top institutions, say Political Science and Political Economy or Politics and Communication at LSE, or MPhil Politics at Cambridge. Are those within my reach?

    Yes, I have a German Diplom/Magister degree.
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    (Original post by continue)
    No, I want to apply for politics at top institutions, say Political Science and Political Economy or Politics and Communication at LSE, or MPhil Politics at Cambridge. Are those within my reach?

    Yes, I have a German Diplom/Magister degree.
    I am sorry but I have little idea about politics (only economics).

    Have you done any politics modules in your degree? I would assume that some prior exposure to politics at university is a requirement to do a masters in it. I would e-mail the universities and ask them.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Including the continent?
    There could be quantitatively heavy places on the continent, I can't think of any off the top of my head . I'm not saying that no one else can do as much numbers-crunching as those at Essex, but they have built a transatlantic reputation of being particularly rigorous with quant. I've seen quite a bit of numbers-play out of the Dutch political scientists, especially in electoral studies and comparative politics, so there is a possibility there (maybe?). The departments I've studied in has made us aware that both the UK and the continent are generally in the same methdological league/paradigm which would like to move away from the heavily positivist/formal modeling/quantitative domination of political science back in the US.

    The uni where I'm at places their PhD students to top up their quantitative skills in either methods summer schools in the US Ivies or at Essex. Perhaps it's just the insularity of the English speaking world. At present, the training of the PhDs coming out of Essex satisfy Academic hiring committees at US universities (considering how closed off American Political Science can be). Whilst industry-boards have expressed wariness with other places.
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    (Original post by continue)
    My media Master degree is German and I graduated first class, though non-UK grades seem to have a bad reputation. Do you think I have a chance of getting into the top tier like LSE or Cambridge?
    It is possible. There are plenty of non-UK graduates that study at places like LSE and Cambridge. I think in matters of non-UK grades, it would help if your tutor could put a statement comparing you with the rest of your class. And since he's UK-educated, a personal opinion on if you would "fit" in study-style wise. It is difficult to truly gauge what the equivalent of first class honours are in non-UK systems, but say a percentage mark i.e. top 5% of your graduating class is a more concrete indicator of quality.

    If we forget about Economics courses (because those are excessively difficult to get into in LSE/Oxbridge, even if you have an economics degree), I know that Politics, IR and IPE in those schools are more lenient. I know of a BA English that got into LSE IR. Media might be stretching it. As Danny suggested, e-mail the department to be sure. If you at least show in your personal statement that you know enough about politics from an academic perspective as well as speak about current events, it could impress them enough to overlook any prejudice of a Media degree against, say a traditional politics student. One good way of doing this is see if you can find online lecture notes or syllabuses in Politics/IPE through google, or if you have an intranet in your current University, try to access the Politics Departments open folders (like through moodle, blackboard or whatever is used). Give yourself a crash course if you can. My work in IR had absolutely nothing to do with my previous work in Politics, not in regions and not in theory-training. So I appeared as hopeless as someone that does a BA in Underwater Basketweaving! But I employed the method above to teach myself in time for personal statements and research proposals.

    If you have even a slightly relevant to politics work experience, or if you can manage to twist it into being policy relevant, it would help. But really, save yourself some trouble and e-mail departments first if they'd consider Media as an appropriate BA for their needs.
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    (Original post by WaltzvWendt)
    There could be quantitatively heavy places on the continent, I can't think of any off the top of my head . I'm not saying that no one else can do as much numbers-crunching as those at Essex, but they have built a transatlantic reputation of being particularly rigorous with quant. I've seen quite a bit of numbers-play out of the Dutch political scientists, especially in electoral studies and comparative politics, so there is a possibility there (maybe?). The departments I've studied in has made us aware that both the UK and the continent are generally in the same methdological league/paradigm which would like to move away from the heavily positivist/formal modeling/quantitative domination of political science back in the US.

    The uni where I'm at places their PhD students to top up their quantitative skills in either methods summer schools in the US Ivies or at Essex. Perhaps it's just the insularity of the English speaking world. At present, the training of the PhDs coming out of Essex satisfy Academic hiring committees at US universities (considering how closed off American Political Science can be). Whilst industry-boards have expressed wariness with other places.
    That was my point in asking, US/UK don't know much about the continent and are often to quick to dismiss (or rather ignore) it.
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    Hi,

    I am a penultimate bachelors student in Mechanical Engineering in Turkey. I am interested in attending a Master's degree in Economics and/or Finance. I am in the top 10% of my class. What are the chances of my obtaining an offer from renowned universities in this field?
 
 
 
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