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    Was just wondering as I'm considered a British citizen (with two British parents), although I was born and raised in Spain. These last few days have been my first living in the UK.

    Also is there a specified difference between International and EU students?

    Thanks.
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    Yes you probably are, as international status depends on where you have lived, not your nationality.
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    I think you have to have been living here for 5 years and have a British passport to be a home student. I think...
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    Cuentas como EU student, al ser ciudadano británico residente en la Unión Europea (¿tienes pasaporte español? - es irrelevante, contarías igual, pero vamos). Pagarás home fees, tranquilo.

    (You are an EU student, being a British citizen residing in the EU (do you hold a Spanish passport? - it's irrelevant, you would still be an EU student, but anyway). You'll pay home fees anyway.)
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    (Original post by SergioMZ)
    (You are an EU student, being a British citizen residing in the EU (do you hold a Spanish passport? - it's irrelevant, you would still be an EU student, but anyway). You'll pay home fees anyway.)
    He'll pay home fees, but if he's classified as an EU student (as he probably will be), he won't qualify for a maintenance loan, which may or may not be a problem.
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    As far a I'm aware, to qualify for the student loan, you must have been living in England, Wales, etc. for three years prior to starting the course. And you will be classified as an EU student, so not quite international, but not Home. A British passport makes no diference to either case.

    Be thankful you're not from the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands, then you'd really be ****** over.
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    (Original post by milesofsea)

    Be thankful you're not from the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands, then you'd really be ****** over.
    Really? How come?


    Thanks for the answers guys. The student loan isn't something I'll need until second year, I assume I'll be classified as a British citizen then- If not then... well, who knows.
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    (Original post by milesofsea)
    Be thankful you're not from the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands, then you'd really be ****** over.
    Yeah...it's not that good. I'm from Guernsey in the Channel Islands. Basically, we have a fairly unique status in which we have our own government but we are supported by the UK on various matters (e.g. defence). Plus, we are not technically part of the EU. What this means is that we pay international fees, higher than EU students (although I think it's less than what people from really far away pay).

    What's annoying is that we pay this amount dispite our close connection with the UK and dispite the fact that my passport says I'm British. Also, we're so small that we have no real weight to persuade the UK to do much about it.
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    (Original post by James4d)
    Really? How come?


    Thanks for the answers guys. The student loan isn't something I'll need until second year, I assume I'll be classified as a British citizen then- If not then... well, who knows.

    ttoby has explined it quite well in the post above. The Islands mentioned are effectively tax havens and so a connection could be made between this fact and their EU-dodging. Technically, they don't belong to the United Kingdom either, rather are 'British Crown Dependancies'. So they don't come under Home/EU status, despite being so close to the UK, and aligning themselves to it when it suits them. For example the UK is responsible for the security and defence of the islands and they use the British pound sterling, albeit on a certain island they put pictures of cows on banknotes in place of the queen (not to deliberately insult the monarchy, they just love their cows).

    So it's lucky that British unis recognise the absurdity of it, and charge a seperate 'Islands' fee. It's still hefty mind, about twice that of a Home/EU student, but not quite as expensive as the international fee. Plus the fact that as I mentioned, you cannot qualify for a loan from SLC England for example without having lived in England for three years immediately before enrolling (not that it would cover the fee). You have to be fairly poor and qualify for a grant or very rich to afford uni, and as in most communities, most residents fit into the middle bracket somewhere.

    As said, they're so small and insignificant, no one really has the power to change things.
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    (Original post by ttoby)
    Yeah...it's not that good. I'm from Guernsey in the Channel Islands. Basically, we have a fairly unique status in which we have our own government but we are supported by the UK on various matters (e.g. defence). Plus, we are not technically part of the EU. What this means is that we pay international fees, higher than EU students (although I think it's less than what people from really far away pay).

    What's annoying is that we pay this amount dispite our close connection with the UK and dispite the fact that my passport says I'm British. Also, we're so small that we have no real weight to persuade the UK to do much about it.

    International students pay about 10K for a standard humanities degree I believe, whilst Islands students pay about 6K.
 
 
 
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