Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Would scrappng 'mickey mouse degrees' solve the funding crisis? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lechaton-x)
    No. Most Media teachers have English Language degrees, and aren't very well versed in the subject- now schools want their teachers to have their degrees in Media.

    I study it because I enjoy it, it has no relevance to what I want to do- but it is NOT pointless if you want to go on to do film and TV production, design or teaching for example..
    A lot of people I know chose to do media, film and television related degrees and not even one managed to secure positions in any of those areas after completing their courses. Most have gone into teaching. Instead, I've come across people working in film and TV who seem to have done unrelated degree's such English, Psychology etc.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lechaton-x)
    No. Most Media teachers have English Language degrees, and aren't very well versed in the subject- now schools want their teachers to have their degrees in Media.

    I study it because I enjoy it, it has no relevance to what I want to do- but it is NOT pointless if you want to go on to do film and TV production, design or teaching for example..
    (Original post by BillySharp92)
    Yet the most sucessful actors/directors do not do media studies! They enlist at acting schools or whatever, rather than holding a camera and presenting a power point show on the effects of Mongolian cinema on modern day western culture.
    If you really do have a burning desire to be a director, actor, tv producer, you would not take media studies. You either have the talent, or work hard enough and do a 'proper degree' (the vast majority of TV producers I believe have English degrees).
    This.
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by babygirl110)
    A lot of people I know chose to do media, film and television related degrees and not even one managed to secure positions in any of those areas after completing their courses. Most have gone into teaching. Instead, I've come across people working in film and TV who seem to have done unrelated degree's such English, Psychology etc.
    Part of the problem seems to be that many students aren't satisfactorily informed before and during their university study about the sometimes significant gap between their vocational aims and the likelihood of success in landing a desired career, regardless of getting a good degree in the relevant subject. Who is to blame? All advanced economies have consistently been trying to maximise the higher education of their school-leavers - because all the evidence shows that future economic success is going to be, in general terms, in high-level knowledge-based skills. At the same time the governments of those economies can't make simplistic guarantees to would-be graduates because they have no control over market needs, market needs which constantly change.

    My university study - I have two degrees so far - has been undertaken without any vocational expectations. I have pursued higher education for reasons of personal intellectual growth more than anything.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bishamon)
    And you know this how? Christ almighty people like you and the OP are so amusingly stupid it can boggle the mind at times. The overheads on such non vocational degrees is incredibly low and pulling the plug on them would probably create a hole where there was once a source of employable graduates. Its the degrees like medicine and engineering which actually cost universities the most due to their dependence of specialist equipment, labs and funded research. The media studies degrees which you lol at so much actually produce a number very competent graduates who are immediately employable in the field.

    I can understand the sentiment that some degrees are more valuable than ohers. However I am willing to listen to the informed opinions of recruitment consultation/headhunter than some immature clown babbling incoherently about a job market he has little to no experience of let alone understands.
    A number media graduates I know have no jobs and some have gone into teaching.

    People I have seen working in media have not even done media related degrees.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Oswy)
    Part of the problem seems to be that many students aren't satisfactorily informed before and during their university study about the sometimes significant gap between their vocational aims and the likelihood of success in landing a desired career, regardless of getting a good degree in the relevant subject. Who is to blame? All advanced economies have consistently been trying to maximise the higher education of their school-leavers - because all the evidence shows that future economic success is going to be, in general terms, in high-level knowledge-based skills. At the same time the governments of those economies can't make simplistic guarantees to would-be graduates because they have no control over market needs, market needs which constantly change.

    My university study - I have two degrees so far - has been undertaken without any vocational expectations. I have pursued higher education for reasons of personal intellectual growth more than anything.
    Bold bit- true.

    Since you decided to pursue two degrees for personal intellectual growth, what do you plan to do now that you have completed your studies?
    It's just something that baffles me as a lot of people are choosing to do degrees just because they find the subject interesting but finding themselves jobless and complaining at the end of their studies.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I'm leaning towards agreeing with the OP, although really it depends what degrees would be put under the umbrella of being useless. Some people regard my subject as a mickey mouse degree, so to it really depends where you draw the line.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Simply put, I'd like to see a new system come in:

    1. The ex-polys that haven't embraced the university ethos of both teaching and research will be privatised and turned back into technical higher education colleges, with the government encouraging bids from interested consortia that want to have some input over how vocational or industry-specific skills are taught, and who would have financial and academic oversight. All vocational courses offered at these new universities would have to have integrated work experience in any courses offered, and they wouldn't be considered degrees.

    2. The 50-60 universities that do actually fit the definition of a university, will remain in state control, with no tuition fees, or at the very least them not rising beyond current levels, and would offer academic subjects.

    Non-academic skills are important, however I don't see why the state should fund them when the state largely doesn't use them.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by im so academic)
    I personally disagree as a university education is not a right, it's a privilege.
    i believe it is a right - if you have worked for it. I dont believe they should be handed out willy nilly, i believe the propensity and the work ethic plus the ability need to be demonstrated

    (Original post by future_hopeful_uk)
    Either things with stupidly low requirements, EXTREMELY specialised or just downright rediculous and do not require degrees for the profession. Complications arise with history, classics etc.

    Beach Management
    Golf Management........ how many managers of golf courses have a degree in golf management?
    Media Studies............. all the best journalists have english degrees from Oxbridge.
    etc
    beach management would be something that would be very useful to someone interested in working for an enviromental agency such as the national trust or british wildlife institute

    As for stupidly low entry well what the point having an A* or whatever in say French if French is never going to come into the course the job its designed to help you for

    (Original post by Hylean)
    Media Studies, and Film Studies, is actually a very important subject in a world which is dominated by the Media. Just because it is a relatively new discipline doesn't make it worthless. It is essentially the same as an English Literature degree, only there's a lot more to study, etc.

    Case in point, literature wasn't considered a serious discipline until well into the 20th century and being an author was only considered being a worthwhile job from the 19th century.
    Not to mention who decides what degrees are pointless? The OP is presenting only what "he" thinks is pointless - opinion does not count in something in this idealology. He presented breach management as a mickey mouse degree, i gave a perfectly logical and acceptable answer as to what it can be used for, therefore not pointless.

    Needless to say theres an awful lot of snobbery in this thread so i think i wont read through the other 10 pages before i start finding myself gettin very annoyed
    Offline

    13
    (Original post by babygirl110)
    ...

    Since you decided to pursue two degrees for personal intellectual growth, what do you plan to do now that you have completed your studies?

    It's just something that baffles me as a lot of people are choosing to do degrees just because they find the subject interesting but finding themselves jobless and complaining at the end of their studies.
    I managed to find a (non-graduate) job quite quickly after completion of my bachelors degree - whereupon I saved up to self-fund the masters I began two years later. I'm hopeful of starting a PhD next September though this can only happen if I get funded - and the short-term horizon on such funding doesn't look too good right now. If I complete a PhD I'll hopefully, sooner or later, get an opportunity to teach at university.

    In the meantime it may be that my academic successes will contribute - by some measure - my landing of a job in the future (I'm unemployed right now) but I won't have any specific complaints otherwise. While I think governments and universities have some responsibilities to let would-be university students know that a degree is no guarantee of their ideqalised career, I also think that students themselves should be thinking about the matter too. I've met more than a couple of graduates who paid no mind to the issue of their future employment prospects until the very last weeks of their final year and only then suddenly woke up to the reality that therer might be a gap between their vocational aims and the needs of the market (which, as I say, are often volatile and unpredictable from one year to the next).

    I have to say that for me university education has been a fantastic experience and one which has genuinely nurtured my intellectual growth in no small measure. Even if I were unable to ever get a career-type job as a result of my studies I don't regret at all having jumped through those hoops. I know it's different for those who see university primarily, or only, as a means to a good job, but I don't fit that category.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by pippa90)
    You think it's interior decoration don't you? And you didn't read my small print or click on the link did you? Oh how you are the dumb one. Did you know that you can get onto the Architecture Masters course at the Royal College of Art (one of the best for architecture masters) with an interior design degree? No? Do your research before you open your mouth next time.
    I'm the dumb one, I'm not doing interior design. So according to you the basis of your degree being somewhat useful is that you can get into architecture after it :lolwut:. and I saw your link all of those things students made. Is it worth being 25k in debt to do something which obviously did not require a degree hell no. If you planned to do a degree in architecture then you shouldn't have wasted 3 years doing your degree.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Surf Science at Plymouth University, enough said.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by future_hopeful_uk)
    You're probably going to get this from about 100 people now, but degrees are NOT standardised..... hence why your degree probably doesnt cover 2nd order differential equations, yet its 'engineering'..
    Engineering degrees are standardised. For a degree to be accredited it must cover second order differential equations, and if you look at the engineering institution's websites you'll see there's a huge amount of universities offering accredited MEng programmes.

    I don't know why you assumed that his engineering degree doesn't cover second order differential equations, but then from this thread we can gather that intelligent responses or discussions are beyond you.
    Offline

    21
    (Original post by babygirl110)
    oh, really?
    Yes, really. :wink2:
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think that a government should dictate what a university teaches. One could argue that governments should participate in choosing the offerings of universities because part of their funding comes from taxpayers coffers.

    My suggestion would be to have a cut off point where any course that has entry requirements below a certain level, say: BBC/280 UCAS points doesn't receive government funding, or have a sliding scale where the lower the entry requirements the less funding it attracts.

    This would have to be balanced by having a central exam board for A-levels, so that the exam boards don't make their exams easier at the request of universities wanting to attract more funding.

    The above two solutions enacted together, along with allowing universities to fail and go bankrupt, would clean up the university system.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    Engineering degrees are standardised. For a degree to be accredited it must cover second order differential equations, and if you look at the engineering institution's websites you'll see there's a huge amount of universities offering accredited MEng programmes.

    I don't know why you assumed that his engineering degree doesn't cover second order differential equations, but then from this thread we can gather that intelligent responses or discussions are beyond you.
    Most psychology courses are accredited by the BPS and have Graduate Basis for Registration, does this mean that the degrees are standardised? Same as law degrees, they are governed by the law society. Does that mean they are standardised? If so, why do graduate recruiters still prefer graduates from the top universities? Doesn't it suggest that university matters?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RamocitoMorales)
    Yes, really. :wink2:
    It's not that I don't believe you, I just didn't think that was possible. I just have never imagined Oxbridge taking students from universities that rank low. Have you come across individuals from say, former poly's who have been accepted onto post graduate courses at Oxford or Cambridge, UCL etc?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by babygirl110)
    Most psychology courses are accredited by the BPS and have Graduate Basis for Registration, does this mean that the degrees are standardised? Same as law degrees, they are governed by the law society. Does that mean they are standardised? If so, why do graduate recruiters still prefer graduates from the top universities? Doesn't it suggest that university matters?
    I could have sworn that my post said engineering and nothing about psychology or law.

    (Original post by babygirl110)
    It's not that I don't believe you, I just didn't think that was possible. I just have never imagined Oxbridge taking students from universities that rank low. Have you come across individuals from say, former poly's who have been accepted onto post graduate courses at Oxford or Cambridge, UCL etc?
    That's because you are completely ****ing clueless about higher education.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    I don't think the courses should stop, but the qualification you get from them shouldn't be a DEGREE. Maybe make another name for it like advanced media studies for example (not that I'm saying media studies is a pointless degree- however some of the things my friend "learns" in her media degree I've known since I was 3)..

    People have every right to study "football studies" if they like, but they shouldn't get an honours degree from it.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by babygirl110)
    It's not that I don't believe you, I just didn't think that was possible. I just have never imagined Oxbridge taking students from universities that rank low. Have you come across individuals from say, former poly's who have been accepted onto post graduate courses at Oxford or Cambridge, UCL etc?
    Yeah, me :p:
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    This.

    Media studies and film studies (is there any difference? :confused: ) seem to exist purely for the students who couldn't do a real subject like english literature or history or a science to get grades that aren't truly horrible (but i'd wager a B or C in english literature was thought of more highly than an A* in film studies by 99% of employers).
    Has it ever occurred to you that someone doing film studies might actually have a real, true passion for film and CHOSE to do it? You can't say that a film studies student is simply incapable of studying a more traditional degree. You cannot say film studies is not a real subject - it is. Interesting how you compare it to English literature. Have you ever thought about the fact that you could put the analysis of literature and film on a par? Didn't think you had - please broaden your mind and challenge your approach to matters.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 3, 2010
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.