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Would scrappng 'mickey mouse degrees' solve the funding crisis? watch

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    (Original post by clair1987)
    Yeah, me :p:
    Oh cool. Which uni did you do your undergrad at? Did you end up at Durham for your postgraduate? Which subject?
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    This.

    Media studies and film studies (is there any difference? :confused: ) seem to exist purely for the students who couldn't do a real subject like english literature or history or a science to get grades that aren't truly horrible (but i'd wager a B or C in english literature was thought of more highly than an A* in film studies by 99% of employers).
    I took Film at A-level.

    Oxford seem to disagree with your suggestion that it's a pointless subject, since they counted it as one of my A-grades.
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    (Original post by babygirl110)
    Oh cool. Which uni did you do your undergrad at? Did you end up at Durham for your postgraduate? Which subject?
    Wolverhampton Uni, yes i'm doing postgrad in Social Work at Durham and I had offers from Warwick, Edinburgh, York and Leicester. So it is quite normal amongst higher ranking uni's to accept students from ex polys.
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    Im going to get negged repped to **** for this, but it has to be said:

    Media studies is the special education program of university education. Most people learn everything that is taught in it just from owning a television, but there are some unfortunate people who actually have to be taught about such things as how biased news programs can be. It is for their own protection really.


    Before anybody starts, YES...I am an open university student (the horror!). I am also self employed and am more than comfortable financially. Thank you very much.
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    (Original post by FrankRabbit)
    Surf Science at Plymouth University, enough said.
    Not really... There seems to be no point to your post. Are you implying that a science course that encompasses wave physics, oceanography and meteorology, marine biology, streamlining designs, manufacturing processes, teaching and instruction skill, business management and a scientific research project is a waste of time?
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    This has to be the most pointless post ive ever read on TSR! What does it matter to you if people are stuying your so called 'Mickey Mouse' degrees, not everyone in the world is destined to find english, science and maths interesting!
    Just because something is new does not mean it is pointless! Just let it be that people are interested in and want to pursue different things. If people are paying for a degree, no matter what it is, then they are clearly holding an interest in that particular area...and who are you to question that!
    "Media studies is micky mouse, too easy, for dumb people" is just a ignorant belief, get over it, some people want to study Media.
    Oh and by the way, you dont see many 'mickey mouse' students slandering degrees that you see as 'proper' so show them the same courtesy!
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    (Original post by Soph1990)
    This has to be the most pointless post ive ever read on TSR! What does it matter to you if people are stuying your so called 'Mickey Mouse' degrees, not everyone in the world is destined to find english, science and maths interesting!
    Just because something is new does not mean it is pointless! Just let it be that people are interested in and want to pursue different things. If people are paying for a degree, no matter what it is, then they are clearly holding an interest in that particular area...and who are you to question that!
    "Media studies is micky mouse, too easy, for dumb people" is just a ignorant belief, get over it, some people want to study Media.
    Oh and by the way, you dont see many 'mickey mouse' students slandering degrees that you see as 'proper' so show them the same courtesy!
    Not that I agree with the OP but I believe his original point was that he thinks the taxpayer has to subside this, and he thinks the government should only be paying for core 'academic' degrees which are 'of use' to the state.

    Not my view, just the argument in the thread.
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    (Original post by Gemma :)!)
    I don't think the courses should stop, but the qualification you get from them shouldn't be a DEGREE. Maybe make another name for it like advanced media studies for example (not that I'm saying media studies is a pointless degree- however some of the things my friend "learns" in her media degree I've known since I was 3)..

    People have every right to study "football studies" if they like, but they shouldn't get an honours degree from it.
    But why not? What matters, surely, is the academic standard and the skill-set which graduates from all degrees are expected to attain, regardless of subject. There may be degrees in subjects like media where a specific university doesn't appear to have set the bar very high, but that's really a problem with the university not with the subject itself. There's no obvious reason why media can't be studied at a challenging level as other subjects can be. Likewise with your (imaginary?) 'football studies' degree - the study of football could easily incorporate physiology, psychology, economics, politics, geography, culture, masculinity, and so on, all subject that have some very challenging empirical and theoretical dimensions.
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    (Original post by future_hopeful_uk)
    Do we really need Portsmouth 'Mathematics' graduates studying A Level Maths and getting a degree from it?
    my friend does maths at portsmouth :plz2:
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    Not that I agree with the OP but I believe his original point was that he thinks the taxpayer has to subside this, and he thinks the government should only be paying for core 'academic' degrees which are 'of use' to the state.

    Not my view, just the argument in the thread.
    Among the longest established subjects that are studied in university is philosophy, easily understood in the academic sense as belonging to such a 'core', yet how directly useful is philosophy in a vocational setting?

    What too many pre-university students don't seem to realise - and this isn't directed at you - is that all degrees are designed to provide a minimum standard in skills such as time-management, independent research, critical reading, argument formation, written and oral communications, and so on. To this end it makes no difference if you're studying history or media studies. Yes, some degrees are explicitly aimed at developing vocation-specific skills, most obviously in medicine and engineering, but more broadly the aim of a degree is to make you a good thinker, good researcher, good problem-solver and good communicator, transferable skills which many employment sectors are looking for.
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    But why not? What matters, surely, is the academic standard and the skill-set which graduates from all degrees are expected to attain, regardless of subject. There may be degrees in subjects like media where a specific university doesn't appear to have set the bar very high, but that's really a problem with the university not with the subject itself. There's no obvious reason why media can't be studied at a challenging level as other subjects can be. Likewise with your (imaginary?) 'football studies' degree - the study of football could easily incorporate physiology, psychology, economics, politics, geography, culture, masculinity, and so on, all subject that have some very challenging empirical and theoretical dimensions.
    ..But if they WERE as academic, then they wouldn't count as a "Mickey Mouse degree" would they? They're the ones I meant. I'm sure that some institutions provide very academic courses, but each individual course needs to be assessed and correctly leveled.
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    (Original post by future_hopeful_uk)
    Do we really need Portsmouth 'Mathematics' graduates studying A Level Maths and getting a degree from it?
    Why the hate for Portsmouth? :confused:
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    (Original post by Gemma :)!)
    ..But if they WERE as academic, then they wouldn't count as a "Mickey Mouse degree" would they? They're the ones I meant. I'm sure that some institutions provide very academic courses, but each individual course needs to be assessed and correctly leveled.
    There's no reason why media can't be as academically rigorous as, say, history, geography or anthropology. Moreover, there's no reason why we should believe they aren't as academically rigorous at any given institution unless there's compelling objective evidence to suggest that is the case. Just because some people here and elsewhere want to play snobbery games over subjects and accuse some degrees of being 'Mickey Mouse degrees' it doesn't count for actual evidence, it's just their opinion. By all means accuse specific degrees offered by specific universities of being below acceptable standards, and provide the supporting evidence, but don't expect to call a subject 'Mickey Mouse' and get away with it.
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    (Original post by bullet_theory92)
    shouldnt everybody who wants to study at university be given a chance to study what theyre passionate about even if theyre not oxbridge standard?
    Yes, if they're willing to pay for it.

    But the role of universities is to provide the next generation of scientists, engineers, doctors, innovates, architects, and leaders for the good of the country and its economy. They should be elite universities. Most people should NOT be going to university, god knows why Blair had this target of 50%?!

    We NEED people to do low-skilled manual jobs, cleaning etc.
    But now little Johnny thinks he's above these jobs because he's got a degree in Xbox Studies from Hemmington University, so we have a labour shortage, and have to import Third-Worlders to plug the gap.

    What a mess the liberals have created.

    If people want to go and study some wishy-washy course for interest, fine, if they want to pay for it.
    But sciences, medicine, engineering etc could be subsided or free if other courses had to pay more - and it's in the national interest to have lots of scientists, engineers etc as this leads to enterprise and wealth creation.
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    Among the longest established subjects that are studied in university is philosophy, easily understood in the academic sense as belonging to such a 'core', yet how directly useful is philosophy in a vocational setting?
    What too many pre-university students don't seem to realise - and this isn't directed at you - is that all degrees are designed to provide a minimum standard in skills such as time-management, independent research, critical reading, argument formation, written and oral communications, and so on. To this end it makes no difference if you're studying history or media studies. Yes, some degrees are explicitly aimed at developing vocation-specific skills, most obviously in medicine and engineering, but more broadly the aim of a degree is to make you a good thinker, good researcher, good problem-solver and good communicator, transferable skills which many employment sectors are looking for.
    Very actually, studying philosophy is like taking all the skills developed in all the other subjects and learning them instead of some applied crap which will be out of date in a decade or two.
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    Among the longest established subjects that are studied in university is philosophy, easily understood in the academic sense as belonging to such a 'core', yet how directly useful is philosophy in a vocational setting?

    What too many pre-university students don't seem to realise - and this isn't directed at you - is that all degrees are designed to provide a minimum standard in skills such as time-management, independent research, critical reading, argument formation, written and oral communications, and so on. To this end it makes no difference if you're studying history or media studies. Yes, some degrees are explicitly aimed at developing vocation-specific skills, most obviously in medicine and engineering, but more broadly the aim of a degree is to make you a good thinker, good researcher, good problem-solver and good communicator, transferable skills which many employment sectors are looking for.
    Exactly - it's not about what you learn, it's that you learn to learn.
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    (Original post by MaceyThe)
    Yes, if they're willing to pay for it.

    But the role of universities is to provide the next generation of scientists, engineers, doctors, innovates, architects, and leaders for the good of the country and its economy. They should be elite universities. Most people should NOT be going to university, god knows why Blair had this target of 50%?!

    We NEED people to do low-skilled manual jobs, cleaning etc.
    But now little Johnny thinks he's above these jobs because he's got a degree in Xbox Studies from Hemmington University, so we have a labour shortage, and have to import Third-Worlders to plug the gap.

    What a mess the liberals have created.

    If people want to go and study some wishy-washy course for interest, fine, if they want to pay for it.
    But sciences, medicine, engineering etc could be subsided or free if other courses had to pay more - and it's in the national interest to have lots of scientists, engineers etc as this leads to enterprise and wealth creation.
    Actually the low-skill sectors (manual or otherwise) in advanced economies such as ours have been shrinking for some time thanks mostly to outsourcing and technological developments which have rendered many roles redundant. At the same time all the advanced economies have been trying to increase their graduation rates because all the advice is that future economic success will depend on knowledge-based and creative skills, not on who has the greatest labour reserve of cleaners, security guards and supermarket shelf-fillers.

    And, given that leisure-based technology development is a growing global sector, 'XBox Studies' isn't all that daft an idea.

    You lose.
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    People have stated that universities should only pick students with grades higher than BBB. In the course that I am doing, Radiography, even Exeter didn't have entry requirements that high (last year), it also makes very little sense to have grade requirements verging on that required of Medicine to do a degree which is not on the same level; additionally, having such requirements would inflate A-level grades even further.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    When some 250,000 people apply for spaces that do not exist we cannot simply allow people to study things if they are not up to standard.

    I can't understand how any course in this day and age can have entry requirements lower than BBB, and really, anywhere lower than AAA is not worth going to.
    Sheffield offer AAB for medicine, surely that's a place worth going to?
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    why does everyone on TSR always use the same phrase?
    And this is obviously just going to turn into people doing science etc bashing everyone who does anything arts or humanities related...sigh.
    WHY CAN'T THERE BE PEACE BETWEEN ALL SUBJECTS??? WHY???? :'(
 
 
 
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