Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Is there any point in doing a Masters? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Unless you want a career in academia, most Masters courses seem utterly unneccessary to securing pretty much all top jobs. I've never seen it as a requirement. Yet so many people do them. Is it just putting off going into the world of work for a lot of people?:rolleyes:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Depends on what you consider to be a "top job" and which people really want that. Researchers in fortune 500 companies aren't exactly at the top of the pecking order. Don't think anyone would risk putting it as a requirement for a non-research job anyway unless it's got a very specialized area of knowledge needed like in Consulting. An MA could still be preferable considering how a lot of applicants have a BA/BSc these days. They certainly wouldn't bar a brilliant BA/BSc holder that gained their knowledge closer to earth, but how many can there possibly be given a certain role?

    And whoever goes into it thinking it's best to do that than to hide from getting a job (not being unable to, there's a difference)....is going to get a GIANT slap in the face. Masters aren't walks in the park and you don't want to drop money in a place where you can fail out of.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Boffin1234)
    Unless you want a career in academia, most Masters courses seem utterly unneccessary to securing pretty much all top jobs. I've never seen it as a requirement. Yet so many people do them. Is it just putting off going into the world of work for a lot of people?:rolleyes:
    In a number of professions a postgraduate qualification, sometimes even a PhD, is necessary. Examples include librarians, archivists and curators. But there are a number of others.

    Then there are other careers when an accredited degree is required. If someone doesn't have a relevant, accredited undergraduate degree then they need to take a masters (or second undergrad). Examples include town planning and surveying.

    Some people want to do a masters because they enjoy the subject. Shocking as it may seem.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    You are looking at this in the wrong way; no job has any academic requirements per se. But an academic qualification is a statement of general aptitude, thus suitability for a job. The higher the qualification the higher the general aptitude. Of course, philistines have abused the system so that jobs that do require a high level of aptitude have been tarnished by the qualifications system so that it is no longer used as a 'system of aptitude' but as a means of controlling the number of applicants in particular areas.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I agree.
    I just was wondering about the steady stream of people who are merrily going on to do Masters. Our education system is becoming something of a production line. It is now (unfortunately) expected that you go on to University. People are looked down upon if they don't at least have a BA now. I just worry that people feel as though they have to do a Masters, and the degree is being devalued.
    All of this is skating round the point; what we need is a stronger vocational sector and not a diluting of our universities.
    Until I went to University I always really admired those who went on to do Masters as the truly exceptional minority. I'm fast learning I was labouring under a misapprehension.

    Sorry just to correct you, there are plenty of well paid jobs that DO have academic requirements.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    From internet you can get many of solutions for your all master degree subjects.So you can download best solution material for all your subjects and then start the preparation for that subject.You can manage your time while you are in college can be extremely difficult. In mster degree you had weekly assignments and tests to keep you on track, and at work a boss monitors your output.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    I'm studying for an MSc Accounting & Finance. Sure, it's not a necessity for the field, but it does grant me some more exemptions (my BA Accountancy also granted me some) from the professional qualifications that I will need to succeed.

    Also, if an employer had a choice between two candidates, ceteris paribus, he'd choose the one with the Masters over the one with 'just' a Bachelor degree.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ice_Queen)

    Also, if an employer had a choice between two candidates, ceteris paribus, he'd choose the one with the Masters over the one with 'just' a Bachelor degree.
    You have to factor in the time and cost - it's no good saying that, not that it's a fact anyhow.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Fusion)
    You have to factor in the time and cost - it's no good saying that, not that it's a fact anyhow.

    Usually it's done by someone who is really passionate for their subject and wants to study it further, but my comment is an equally valid argument for doing it.

    And of course it's a fact (it's just not likely that there would be two candidates who were equal in every other way :p:).

    Over the course of their career, there is a proven correlation between salary and degree level in many areas, which you could argue takes care of the cost aspect, and the opportunity cost of the Masters is the money earnt from getting a job - again something that is going to be made up. The cons come in when it is difficult to get the funding in the first place, but it's equally possible to do a Masters later in a career.

    No-one is making anyone do a Masters, there are many pros and cons for each option.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    If you want a job in continental Europe you will need a Master's degree. A large proportion of students there go on to Master's and thus, it's a requirement for many jobs.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    OP there are plenty of jobs that require a masters. There are countless specialist masters in fields that are not offered in the same amount of depth at undergraduate level. It sounds like you are making a massive generalisation on a select group of subjects
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ice_Queen)
    Usually it's done by someone who is really passionate for their subject and wants to study it further, but my comment is an equally valid argument for doing it.

    And of course it's a fact (it's just not likely that there would be two candidates who were equal in every other way :p:).

    Over the course of their career, there is a proven correlation between salary and degree level in many areas, which you could argue takes care of the cost aspect, and the opportunity cost of the Masters is the money earnt from getting a job - again something that is going to be made up. The cons come in when it is difficult to get the funding in the first place, but it's equally possible to do a Masters later in a career.

    No-one is making anyone do a Masters, there are many pros and cons for each option.
    Not just the money though is it - there's the experience and even an opportunity to start a professional qualification.

    So basically:

    Harry
    MSc
    all else equal

    Gurateeva
    salary, graduate job experience and started professional qualification
    all else equal

    It's certaintly not a given that Harry is the more attractive candidate from an employers perspective.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Fusion)
    Not just the money though is it - there's the experience and even an opportunity to start a professional qualification.

    So basically:

    Harry
    MSc
    all else equal

    Gurateeva
    salary, graduate job experience and started professional qualification
    all else equal

    It's certaintly not a given that Harry is the more attractive candidate from an employers perspective.
    If Harry has work experience, all else isn't equal, is it.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ice_Queen)
    If Harry has work experience, all else isn't equal, is it.
    So Harry has graduate level experience like Gurateeva?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dan1992)
    really? i'd like to work in the EU doing something to do with law or politics. a postgrad course costs like 14000 a year (at my uni) though when i looked into it and even if you get a scholarship it only pays for half!
    Go to somewhere where they are free, that's what I want to do! Plus I want to get the hell out of the UK, so it kills those two birds
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by Fusion)
    So Harry has graduate level experience like Gurateeva?
    Ah sorry, I misunderstood.

    If Harry has his MSc but no experience, and the other candidate has experience, all is not equal, and it would depend on what the employer values.

    Imagine this situation.

    John - an MSc graduate, who achieved 65% in his BSc Economics from LSE. He has no graduate experience, but has worked in customer service part time for three years. He presents well at interview.

    James - An LSE alumnus who also got 65%. Again, no graduate experience, but has three years part time customer service and presents equally well at interview.

    John would certainly be the preferable candidate.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I thought most people do Masters to get chartership in their career. Chartered Accountants, Chartered Engineers, etc

    As far as I am aware, Civil Engineering companies tend to hire (more) MEng than BEng because they invest in the graduate (graduate training programs) so that they become a professional engineer (chartered).
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by L3mon)
    I thought most people do Masters to get chartership in their career. Chartered Accountants, Chartered Engineers, etc

    As far as I am aware, Civil Engineering companies tend to hire (more) MEng than BEng because they invest in the graduate (graduate training programs) so that they become a professional engineer (chartered).

    To get to be 'chartered' there are often professional qualifications. For example, as an accountant I can do as many degrees as I want, but I will still need three years experience and to sit any exams I don't have exemptions for before I can be accepted as a member to a chartered institute.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I might do a finance one at LSE because it will teach me relevant theories and I get the LSE tag on my CV.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I studied a MSc to get me a competitive job I really wanted. It got me the job. Can't ask for much more than that.

    Masters can help solidify knowledge and fill in the gaps in knowledge and uncertainties from a degree, plus they can be geared more towards a working environment than a degree can be. Those were definitely the two main things I took away from my masters, and they really do help a lot when it comes to job interviews competing with graduates fresh out of uni.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.