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    Hi!

    So I am reapplying - I had to reject my uni place (English at Exeter) in order to my gap year and then ended up missing what would have been my offer. I got A*ABab (A* in english, am retaking a module of the B to make it A) for AS/A levels so AAA courses are going to be tricky to get into.

    Sooo I am thinking that I may apply for English Literature and Classics. I got B in a self-taught Latin AS and enjoy studying it though I'm not very good. My question is whether it would be easier for me to get into an English Literature and Classics course (at like Bristol/Exeter/Warwick) than a straight up English Literature course.

    Thaaanks!
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    (Original post by ollypocket)
    [...] So I am reapplying - I had to reject my uni place (English at Exeter) in order to my gap year and then ended up missing what would have been my offer. I got A*ABab (A* in english, am retaking a module of the B to make it A) for AS/A levels so AAA courses are going to be tricky to get into.

    Sooo I am thinking that I may apply for English Literature and Classics. I got B in a self-taught Latin AS and enjoy studying it though I'm not very good. My question is whether it would be easier for me to get into an English Literature and Classics course (at like Bristol/Exeter/Warwick) than a straight up English Literature course. [...]
    You are right to suggest that a joint-honours degree is easier to get onto than a single honours English programme. Alternatively, you might want to consider comparative literature programmes too; since most universities do not have classics' departments, but will have modern language departments.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    You are right to suggest that a joint-honours degree is easier to get onto than a single honours English programme. Alternatively, you might want to consider comparative literature programmes too; since most universities do not have classics' departments, but will have modern language departments.
    Hi thanks for replying. That's interesting to know. And ah I would but have done no modern language.
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    Well, fewer unis offer comparative lit undergrad degrees than classics degrees (if I remember it well, around 6-7 unis do it - Royal Holloway, St Andrews, Glasgow -the programme is absolutely brilliant here, btw-, Kent, Queen Marry, King's College, maybe somebody else too). Although the prospect of improving your chances at getting into the uni you want is attractive, I think you should look into what classics programmes entail (how many hours of Latin vs how many hours of literature/culture lectures you'll have, how fast are you expected to reach proficiency in Latin, etc) and think very carefully about this because university level classics/Latin is much more intense than AS.
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    (Original post by ollypocket)
    Hi thanks for replying. That's interesting to know. And ah I would but have done no modern language.
    Often, you do not need modern language skills to study comparative literature; I take a masters in European Literatures and it is all done in English (I think there is only one Italian unit which requires language skills, but you can avoid it obviously). With regards to andyyy's comment, that might be true. But over time comparative literature will become more popular because almost every university has a language department but most universities do not have classics departments; you can already seen this at postgraduate level.
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    (Original post by andyyy)
    Well, fewer unis offer comparative lit undergrad degrees than classics degrees (if I remember it well, around 6-7 unis do it - Royal Holloway, St Andrews, Glasgow -the programme is absolutely brilliant here, btw-, Kent, Queen Marry, King's College, maybe somebody else too). Although the prospect of improving your chances at getting into the uni you want is attractive, I think you should look into what classics programmes entail (how many hours of Latin vs how many hours of literature/culture lectures you'll have, how fast are you expected to reach proficiency in Latin, etc) and think very carefully about this because university level classics/Latin is much more intense than AS.
    Oh thanks that's really interesting. Will definitely have a look at these comparative courses
    And good point with how advanced my latin should be. I have found courses that don't require it

    (Original post by evantej)
    Often, you do not need modern language skills to study comparative literature; I take a masters in European Literatures and it is all done in English (I think there is only one Italian unit which requires language skills, but you can avoid it obviously). With regards to andyyy's comment, that might be true. But over time comparative literature will become more popular because almost every university has a language department but most universities do not have classics departments; you can already seen this at postgraduate level.
    Oh right. That's interesting. I will have a google and see what I can find.
    Thanks so much guys, definitely been helpful.
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    (Original post by ollypocket)
    Oh thanks that's really interesting. Will definitely have a look at these comparative courses
    And good point with how advanced my latin should be. I have found courses that don't require it
    You mean you can actually get a classics degree without knowing Latin or Ancient Greek? You've just diminished my faith in the British educational system. If you only mean that prior knowledge of Latin/Ancient Greek is not required to apply for the course, then I still think you should look up how fast you're meant to learn the language. I've taken Latin in school for four years and it was the most painful, exhausting course I've ever taken because Latin is harder to learn than most (European) modern languages. So if the uni want to bring you to relative fluency in a year, you should expect the course to be really intense. Not that that's necessarily bad thing, I just think you should be aware of the fact that a Classics degree might be quite demanding.

    But, yeah, Comparative Lit is awesome. I'm not sure about St Andrews (they only started offering the degree this year), but at Glasgow you can take Classics as your outside subject (since it's a Scottish uni) and then do classic literature/culture modules at honours within a Comparative Lit degree. Your degree can look like this: in first and second year you take English Lit, Comparative Lit and Classics, then in your third and fourth years you can do English Lit modules, Comparative Lit core modules + Classics modules as options for the Comparative Lit bit of your degree. It's really flexible.
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    (Original post by andyyy)
    You mean you can actually get a classics degree without knowing Latin or Ancient Greek? You've just diminished my faith in the British educational system. If you only mean that prior knowledge of Latin/Ancient Greek is not required to apply for the course, then I still think you should look up how fast you're meant to learn the language. I've taken Latin in school for four years and it was the most painful, exhausting course I've ever taken because Latin is harder to learn than most (European) modern languages. So if the uni want to bring you to relative fluency in a year, you should expect the course to be really intense. Not that that's necessarily bad thing, I just think you should be aware of the fact that a Classics degree might be quite demanding.
    Oh no I know. I took latin for GCSE then did an independent AS and that was difficult! Now I'm doing an Honours Latin course at a school in Brooklyn NYC so I've been keeping it up, will need to put in the work obviously but I don't mind screwing myself over academically. I kind of pile everything on my plate then deal with it usually.
    But, yeah, Comparative Lit is awesome. I'm not sure about St Andrews (they only started offering the degree this year), but at Glasgow you can take Classics as your outside subject (since it's a Scottish uni) and then do classic literature/culture modules at honours within a Comparative Lit degree. Your degree can look like this: in first and second year you take English Lit, Comparative Lit and Classics, then in your third and fourth years you can do English Lit modules, Comparative Lit core modules + Classics modules as options for the Comparative Lit bit of your degree. It's really flexible.
    I don't think I'd risk St Andrews. I may have a look at Glasgow but might be far away!!!
    Reply more soon!
 
 
 
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