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    What about people born in 1981. Are we excluded? :hmmm:
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    (Original post by ThinkingThoughts)
    "popularisation of science, societal degeneration, rampant consumerism, international terrorism of massive scale,
    None of these things are new or important or necessarily even true.
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    I was born in the autumn of 1985, and I'd say the most striking technology related memory for me was my first computer room at secondary school which was in year 7. We had a gloomy old room filled with 20 or so Apple IIs, black and white screen, some kind of awful "mouse", and one printer. As for mobile phones, well my current mobile phone is more powerful than my first few PCs. My first ever computer game was Atic Atac (released in 1983 I believe) which I played aged 3 on my parents' living room floor on a good old ZX Spectrum.

    I remember in year 7 or 8 getting a PC for the first time, having owned only Amigas, and experiencing the joy of Windows 95, and a dial up connection, and being one of about three people in my year who had heard of that thing called the internet. Back to mobile phones, don't think I owned my own until late secondary school, and it was something amazing like a Vodafone MN1.

    Outside of technology, a lot has changed I guess, but I think a lot of what we see as big and world-changing is in a larger picture not as big or world-changing as we the younger generation might think. My parents remember IRA bombings, my father in particular was blown off his motorbike at one such event. My grandparents lived through the second world war, and of course their ancestors lived through the industrial revolution and Britain as an international imperial power. Things have changed a lot in the last 20 years or so, but I don't think it has changed quite as much as we might think or any more so than any other period of time over the last 200 years.
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    you forgot grade inflation OP :rolleyes:
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    Pfft, all the new **** is just superficial, world's the same as it ever was.

    The generation before us thought the same thing, and the one before them, and the one before them, so on so forth...

    Everyone just wants to feel special.
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    we saw the millenium..something our kids etc wont be seeing haha
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    Ah, Babyborn and the little cot, the potty and of course the food that went with it. The weird creaky noise from dial up connection. Getting on my Dad's nerves for picking up the phone when he was on the internet, doing it anyway just so I could hear said creaky noise. Playing Birthday bulldog at school, until got banned. Gameboy and Baby-G. Using Encarta to get my homework done.
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    February 1993. Even though I am Spanish so some things are different, the general trends are more or less the same.
    You made me feel kinda nostalgic. People born two years later than I are already in a complete different generation. I think the limit for the "older ones", the ones who have had a childhood completely apart from computers, is those born in 1993-1994.
    Not getting a phone until rather late, getting a very basic phone and being very happy, and generally not using the Internet everyday.
    Now we use it everyday, but I think that, apart from the surfing we do, we do need it everyday for some important matters (school, etc.) as the internet makes it much easier. However, we have lived without a computer, and actually know how to do it.

    I'm really proud to have been born in 1993, actually.
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    People born in 1985 & 1986 were the last of a generation in my eyes. From the autumn of 1996 (I left primary school that summer) to that of 1999, things seemed to have changed beyond recognition. The Spice Girls arrived; Literacy Hour & Numeracy Hour were introduced in primary schools, leaving less time for everything else; the massive Tamagotchi craze appeared; then the even bigger yo-yo craze did; Google was invented and the Internet became commonly used; mobile phones became widespread; the 'Titanic' phenomenon occurred. All of these just after we had left primary school. It wasn't until I was about Year 8 until I became aware of the Internet.
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    I'd rather be have been born a few million years in the future.
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    I am happy to of grown up in the generation that i have with the increase in medicine but the increse in technology i do not agree with as much as it is taking main morals out of our society.
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    Painful painful nostalgia
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    I remember life before we had a computer/the internet. I think it was better in some ways.
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    It is terrible. I work in a summer club at a primary school and there are 3 boys who are put into the club every day. They sit on their Nintendo DS's from the moment they arrive and if we tell them they have to put them away they constantly complain that they are bored.

    I think that children should learn how to use a computer from a young age but their internet usage should be closely monitored so that they do not have access to many unsafe sites.

    The mobile phone thing is ridiculous. I was almost 11 and even that is a little bit young when I look back. Children do not need a mobile phone until they are off to secondary school.

    Wish we were back living in "the good old days"!
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    (Original post by BeckyBurman28)
    The mobile phone thing is ridiculous. I was almost 11 and even that is a little bit young when I look back. Children do not need a mobile phone until they are off to secondary school.
    I got my first mobile phone for Christmas 2002, a month before my 18th birthday! They first became widespread three years before that. I think 11 is definitely too young for a mobile.
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    I think we were the last 'innocent' generation. I remember when any more than 4 channels on the TV was unusual, night time TV was Teletext/Open University or that girl with the clown. Nobody had mobile phones until year 7/8 (Middle School for me) and our village didn’t even have Broadband until I was in high school.

    I spent childhood outside running about, occasionally on the PS1. My little cousins of only a few years younger than us in the grand scheme of things have computers/mobiles and 24/7 multichannel TV to keep them happy, I think we had it better.
 
 
 
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