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    (Original post by juxtai)
    Ahaha I wish I could be as optimistic as you! It's a great outlook to have So well done, once again. As the saying goes, 'You don't ask, you won't recieve!'

    I have no real background in the language, I'm self-teaching the Kana to myself, and I can get the general topic of a conversation. I'll recognize certain phrases or words, and put them together with the intonation to get a general idea, but nothing really other than that!
    Exactly! It's funny 'cause, I don't see myself as optimistic or pessimistic, just realistic for the most part. =)

    I think hoping on a course for Japanese would be super-exciting if you don't know much, in a way. Super-daunting in another. S'what I expect, anyways. I really want to bump up my vocab. a lot for before I go though. Got until September 2011, so that'll hopefully be enough time.

    Ha ha, intonation! The one complaint Japanese people give me is, "you stress on words too much", meaning my intonation is queer and probably painful. Ha ha! I think I have a dictionary with a pronunciation guide, it can just be difficult to stick to it. Then I try to copy my teacher, but she's from Osaka, so she probably has an accent, I'm guessing.

    (Original post by princessmarisa)
    A word of warning for all you Japanese noobs wanting to study at Uni.
    Firstly, sorry to hear about your experience! My friend went there last year, felt overwhelmed too and dropped out (however, she's doing it again and seems to be coping a lot better). I never really asked her, but maybe that's at least partly why!

    Do you recommend any study techniques at all? I find that so difficult in language learning. For other topics, my method is literally to write everything out until I know it off my heart, then it sticks. =P But, somehow, language doesn't stick so well...

    (Original post by Chayne)
    I wanted to actually *learn* Japanese at uni, but maybe I need to think of it as a place where I can re-enforce what I've learnt.
    Yeah, that's how I think. My mother was shocked when I said to her that Uni. would aid my personal studies, ha ha! But I think it's so true. I don't expect to go to a Uni., then let's pretend then I do the minimum work required to get a 2:1, and be of near native fluency!

    Of course, you hope to be efficient by the end of it, but it really is on you to become as proficient as you can. I think University will be a massive help with my communication skills and knowledge, but I don't think that alone is going to necessarily do much. I know people who have done well in language degrees and eventually forgot everything or didn't feel that they knew much afterwards to begin with. =P But it's a heck of a good start to get a language degree, just need to maintain your skills once graduated!! I hope I'll be able to do that, perhaps live in Japan afterwards to reinforce it and then be skilled enough to qualify as a potential translator/interpretor (although not necessarily do that as a job).
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    I know I'm going to lose some man hours to pointless things every week, so until I can stop this bad habit, I'm probably goign to learn as much as I can for now.

    As for study technique, I read a blog post (think it was Joseph Tame's) recommending the technique on James Heisig's Remembering the Kanji, might be worth checking out.

    Dammit I'm wasting man hours right now! That's it no internet for a while.......
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    (Original post by Susant)
    I know I'm going to lose some man hours to pointless things every week, so until I can stop this bad habit, I'm probably goign to learn as much as I can for now.

    As for study technique, I read a blog post (think it was Joseph Tame's) recommending the technique on James Heisig's Remembering the Kanji, might be worth checking out.

    Dammit I'm wasting man hours right now! That's it no internet for a while.......
    I'm doing RTK atm (Remembering The Kanji), re-enforcing it with an SRS. It's hard work, but potentially really useful.
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    (Original post by Susant)
    Btw, does anyone know if Japanpod101 is any good? Or if theres a decent free equivalent?
    Yeah its' quite good if you want something to listen to on the go and can be repeated but the lesson notes and other stuff isn't available to the free members which can be really annoying and not all of the podcasts are open to free members either. But soaying that the ones that are, are quite useful
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    Just out of interest:

    ????????????? -Edit: Look like the forum doesn't support Japanese Characters

    kore wa, daredemo wakarimasu ka

    Might as well get the practice

    I'm not too fussed about being prepared for the University course at the moment, I'd rather spend the time and effort on working on my current A-levels to make sure I can get into Uni to do the course!

    I do however have a multitude of books and workbooks, some part-read and others barely touched that'll absolutely hammer once I'm done with my A-levels. The most useful ones are:

    Learn Japanese the fast and fun way - Carol and Nobuo Akiyama
    Japanese for busy people (Kana workbook) - AJALT
    Beginners Japanese script - Helen Gilhooly/teach yourself
    Oxford beginner's Japanese dictionary

    I'm sure I'll gather one or two more by the time summer rolls around. I'd recommend them all, though the first only uses ultra-polite forms and doesn't teach casual or -te and suru forms. But then again, that's what I bought all the others - to flesh out my repertoire of resources. I'm also taking tuition from a native speaker which is helping out a LOT.

    I'm personally like to get my head in a good book when it comes to learning, though I've good things about audio CD's. There's countless places online to help with remembering Kanji and kana as well as teaching grammar and vocab but for that you really need some proper tuition.
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    Not to rock the boat but the RTK is not to be used in conjunction with other methods, it is if you have 6months or so spare and just want to learn the meaning of the kanji, then another 6months to learn how to read/pronounce them.

    Otherwise it will just conflict and you will end up learning how to read into english meaning, but not say anything, and you could hear words all day long and have no idea what they mean, but if give them in english write them as a kanji. It just is a very specialist thing.

    SRS such such as anki is really good, but even better is memorising phrases then swapping vocab in and out of them. Everytime you say something in English, if you have time afterwards think to yourself how would I say that in Japanese.

    Start watching anime/drama/film without subtitles, maybe watch the first episode with subs to get a feel for what is going on then turn them off for the rest. If you enjoy it you will happily watch it a couple of times until you understand enough. Don't expect to understand every sentence, let alone every word just pick up what you can, it will sink in naturally.

    What do you like about Japan? Find a Japanese site about it, play on the "Japanese internet" google in Japanese, don't be afraid to have a dictionary open (I really like jisho.org) to look up a word in Japanese so you can search for the original site about a something you like.

    websites like renshuu and smart.fm are godsends, start a lang-8 journal which get's corrected by native Japanese. Write about what you ate for tea, how hard you studied, what your favourite animal is, any old crap it will all help!

    For grammar they take that pretty slow at Uni, but sites liek tae kims guide to Japanese or tim werx Japanese will help too, as will trying to read all you can. Just knowing basic classroom phrases will help tons. Useful things like sit down, please listen, welcome to class, watch and learn, repeat after me, can you say it again please.

    I wish I had known these more!

    Also I loved the pimsleur Japanese II and III mp3s, you can er *get them* off the net quite easily. Start with Japanese I but it repeats so much I was skipping 2 lessons at a time!
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    I see most straight offers are ABB, but for joint Japanese what sort of offers are people getting at Sheffield? (history to be more specific)
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    (Original post by Susant)
    I see most straight offers are ABB, but for joint Japanese what sort of offers are people getting at Sheffield? (history to be more specific)
    I've been offered a place for 2011 at Sheffield for Japanese Studies and Linguistics at ABB. Usually there is only one grade difference for joint degrees, if that.

    Speaking of offers, I've recently received my third and final offer from Newcastle University. Funnily enough though, I've received the offer through e-mail and not through UCAS and neither states whether it is a conditional or unconditional offer or the grades required if it is a conditional offer. Has anyone else had a similar experience with Newcastle University?

    So this is what I now have to work with:

    Japanese & Linguistics:
    Leeds - AAB
    Sheffield - ABB
    Newcastle - ??? (accepted)

    I'll have to chase up the Newcastle offer, but at the moment I think I'll be going with Leeds as my firm and depending on Newcastle Uni's offer with Sheffield as my insurance.
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    (Original post by Donbar)
    Speaking of offers, I've recently received my third and final offer from Newcastle University. Funnily enough though, I've received the offer through e-mail and not through UCAS and neither states whether it is a conditional or unconditional offer or the grades required if it is a conditional offer. Has anyone else had a similar experience with Newcastle University?
    This happened to me with Newcastle too - the offer came through UCAS about two weeks later at ABB.
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    (Original post by Donbar)
    I've been offered a place for 2011 at Sheffield for Japanese Studies and Linguistics at ABB. Usually there is only one grade difference for joint degrees, if that.

    Speaking of offers, I've recently received my third and final offer from Newcastle University. Funnily enough though, I've received the offer through e-mail and not through UCAS and neither states whether it is a conditional or unconditional offer or the grades required if it is a conditional offer. Has anyone else had a similar experience with Newcastle University?

    So this is what I now have to work with:

    Japanese & Linguistics:
    Leeds - AAB
    Sheffield - ABB
    Newcastle - ??? (accepted)

    I'll have to chase up the Newcastle offer, but at the moment I think I'll be going with Leeds as my firm and depending on Newcastle Uni's offer with Sheffield as my insurance.
    It can take up to 3 weeks to appear on Ucas, for my Japanese and cultural studies offer it only took a couple of days... but, like the poster above, the time can be different

    But an offer from newcastle for japanese and linguistics? I'm pretty jealous
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    Just got an interview at Oxford
    Anyone applied/heard from Oxbridge?
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    (Original post by aaant)
    Just got an interview at Oxford
    Anyone applied/heard from Oxbridge?
    I'm still waiting for my interview invitation. Apparently my college sent the letters out yesterday but I'm in Ireland so that won't come for a while. They said they also email to those outside uk up to two days later.... Maybe later today or tomorrow I'll hear.. Ahh
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    (Original post by aaant)
    Just got an interview at Oxford
    Anyone applied/heard from Oxbridge?
    I got an invitation to interview for Oxford too. Which college did you apply to?
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    Evening, I'm also applying for Japanese/Japanese Studies and have applied to SOAS, Sheffield, Leeds x2 and Manchester. I'm on an Access course so was kind of nervous about whether I'd get any offers or not, but Sheffield has offered me a place, yay!

    Unsure about whether to go to SOAS or Sheffield (if I even get an offer from SOAS...) but I have a while to think about it yet.

    Leeds rejected me twice (once for Japanese, once for Japanese & Linguistics) and they told me it was because I failed to mention a book I'd read and offered criticism on it (d'oh... I'm reading several books at the moment as well T_T)... but everything else was fine, and that the rate of application is insanely high this year due to the fee rise (makes sense). I'm not disappointed though, because my boyfriend goes to Leeds and he says you spend your first year having modules about other parts of Asia (not Japan) forced down your throat and you have minimal contact hours for actual Japanese language learning... oh, and because of that, the year abroad in the 2nd year seems too harsh for how unprepared you are! Still, this is just one person's experience, I can't speak for anyone else.
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    (Original post by Digeridoo)
    I got an invitation to interview for Oxford too. Which college did you apply to?
    Hertford college - went there on the open day and really liked it, plus they have 2 Japanese fellows which is a plus
    What sort of preparation have you been doing?
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    ... he says you spend your first year having modules about other parts of Asia (not Japan) forced down your throat and you have minimal contact hours for actual Japanese language learning... oh, and because of that, the year abroad in the 2nd year seems too harsh for how unprepared you are!
    I have heard this complaint about several Unis., I think it must be a normal thing, ha ha! I dunno about Leeds, but I heard Brookes cares about its students though, which makes it seem a bit nicer. I've spoken quite a bit with SOAS and Brookes before, they both seem helpful. I've spoken more to Brookes though, the Senior Tutor for Modern Languages is super-helpful, I appreciate her prompt and informative e-mails.
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    Hertford college - went there on the open day and really liked it, plus they have 2 Japanese fellows which is a plus
    What sort of preparation have you been doing?
    Same! See you there then Although apparently the Norwegian Japanese fellow from Hertford is dead scary xD

    For prep I've read a soul-destroying book that was mentioned on the website (The Making of Modern Japan), part of 'Embracing Defeat' by Dower, did an EPQ on zaibatsu and have basically been trying to analyse my every thought.
    Oh, and obviously JapanToday and stuff from time to time :rolleyes:

    What about you?
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    (Original post by Jazmine)
    I have heard this complaint about several Unis., I think it must be a normal thing, ha ha! I dunno about Leeds, but I heard Brookes cares about its students though, which makes it seem a bit nicer. I've spoken quite a bit with SOAS and Brookes before, they both seem helpful. I've spoken more to Brookes though, the Senior Tutor for Modern Languages is super-helpful, I appreciate her prompt and informative e-mails.
    Yeah, I think at Leeds maybe taking Japanese as a dual honours with something else would ensure you learn about the things you want to, unless you're open to filling up your timetable with unrelated modules - which in that case is hunky dory! I've heard they step up the language learning in the 3rd year, though, to build on what you learnt in Japan. So I guess it's just a matter of how you like your course run. Personally, I prefer the idea of the 3rd year being the year abroad.

    I really want to go to SOAS, it sounds excellent. I could probably manage the cost of London living seeing as going out and getting ****faced every night isn't really my cup of tea.
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    Yeah, I think at Leeds maybe taking Japanese as a dual honours with something else would ensure you learn about the things you want to, unless you're open to filling up your timetable with unrelated modules - which in that case is hunky dory! I've heard they step up the language learning in the 3rd year, though, to build on what you learnt in Japan. So I guess it's just a matter of how you like your course run. Personally, I prefer the idea of the 3rd year being the year abroad.

    I really want to go to SOAS, it sounds excellent. I could probably manage the cost of London living seeing as going out and getting ****faced every night isn't really my cup of tea.
    I thought all Unis did a year abroad in Year 3? =\ 'Cept they are bringing in courses that don't do that, like in SOAS. And I think, if you can't go for disability's sake or something, they work around that too... and if you didn't pass well enough to get in, I'm guessing you do something else. =P

    Yeah, SOAS seems like a really good Uni. for such languages, seeing as it kind of specialises. I heard their admin. staff and whatnot are terribly disorganised though. That you kind of have to rely on yourself, made a few people's year abroad paperwork a bit hasslesome to cope with, etc. Maybe its improved since I last heard though. But the academic side, besides 'having no life' as a result of the workload, everyone seems to like it! Ha ha. As I said, I think some of these things are said about a lot of Universities, so I don't want to scare you, ha ha.

    As you said, everyone has their own experiences. I heard the place is full of hippies, some like that.. some don't. Probably a slight exaggeration too.
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    (Original post by Jazmine)
    I thought all Unis did a year abroad in Year 3? =\ 'Cept they are bringing in courses that don't do that, like in SOAS. And I think, if you can't go for disability's sake or something, they work around that too... and if you didn't pass well enough to get in, I'm guessing you do something else. =P

    Yeah, SOAS seems like a really good Uni. for such languages, seeing as it kind of specialises. I heard their admin. staff and whatnot are terribly disorganised though. That you kind of have to rely on yourself, made a few people's year abroad paperwork a bit hasslesome to cope with, etc. Maybe its improved since I last heard though. But the academic side, besides 'having no life' as a result of the workload, everyone seems to like it! Ha ha. As I said, I think some of these things are said about a lot of Universities, so I don't want to scare you, ha ha.

    As you said, everyone has their own experiences. I heard the place is full of hippies, some like that.. some don't. Probably a slight exaggeration too.
    Nah, Leeds make you do the year abroad in the 2nd year, which I find a bit too scary after only one year of Japanese!

    I've read all the negative stuff about SOAS too, but always heard good things about their Japanese department - I like the fact the university is small, too, and the workload doesn't put me off... I can't wait to get stuck in and actually get taught something I've wanted to learn about for years! I looked at the 'Week in the life of an SOAS student' thread and the timetable for Japanese looks really appealing - lots of language lessons, complimented by a few Japanese culture lectures here and there, and no unrelated fillers.
 
 
 
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