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    That was... interesting. Sucks to hear that they ruined four years of your life.



    Requesting more rants about bad things at the other universities offering Japanese Studies (esp. Sheffield).
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    (Original post by rh209230)
    post
    That's bad to hear but it's a bit late now we've made our choices! Haha.
    I think the issue is that there's a problem with teaching. I'd probably make up for it by putting in effort in my own time to learn new vocabulary, grammar etc. Certainly I think there should be more tuition time than that and hopefully they'll improve over the next 3 years...

    Although I'm personally not really looking to come out as an amazing Japanese speaker, I just want to do something I enjoy somewhere I enjoy. For others your criticisms might be more important and thanks for writing it! I appreciate the input from the other side of the fence. Some people will love/hate everything though so I guess we'll have to find out for ourselves.

    Better start with the asslicking as soon as I get there
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    (Original post by rh209230)
    I am graduating with a degree that is worth absolutely nothing. Not one person in our year can speak Japanese fluently. Jobs? There isn't any for people with a useless degree.
    Why do you put Japanese Studies down so bad? It is a highly academic degree, are you saying it's only worth something if you become fluent?
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    (Original post by Digital_Love)
    Why do you put Japanese Studies down so bad? It is a highly academic degree, are you saying it's only worth something if you become fluent?
    I think the point he's making is that he feels let down on what level his language skills are at e compared to what he feels they should be.
    While maybe not native fluency, I suppose you'd expect to be highly proficient by the end if you put all the work.

    And yes, Japanese is a highly academic degree which I don't think employers would think of as lesser than traditional subjects like History or English. If anything it's quite a practical skill considering we're still talking about the 3rd largest economy in the world.
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    (Original post by Susant)
    I think the point he's making is that he feels let down on what level his language skills are at e compared to what he feels they should be.
    While maybe not native fluency, I suppose you'd expect to be highly proficient by the end if you put all the work.

    And yes, Japanese is a highly academic degree which I don't think employers would think of as lesser than traditional subjects like History or English. If anything it's quite a practical skill considering we're still talking about the 3rd largest economy in the world.
    But even if he was practically fluent in the language, there still may be few well-paid jobs/employers out there who would employ a Japanese Studies grad, as so many Japanese people are brought up speaking/learning English. Can Japanese Studies be said that it place its grads into a good, well-paid career, other than teaching English to Japanese students?

    Most employers may see the Japanese Studies degree as a pretty narrow, specialist course. They would be looking for other skills, which could force grads into post-grad education on top of their four year degree. E.g. translator needs excellent English skills and great knowledge of the translated content to get work.
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    (Original post by Digital_Love)
    But even if he was practically fluent in the language, there still may be few well-paid jobs/employers out there who would employ a Japanese Studies grad, as so many Japanese people are brought up speaking/learning English. Can Japanese Studies be said that it place its grads into a good, well-paid career, other than teaching English to Japanese students?

    Most employers may see the Japanese Studies degree as a pretty narrow, specialist course. They would be looking for other skills, which could force grads into post-grad education on top of their four year degree. E.g. translator needs excellent English skills and great knowledge of the translated content to get work.
    You won't be rammed into any definite career path if you take the degree. The listed careers of Asian Language graduates from Sheffield, Leeds, and Oxford (couldn't find SOAS') shows that its possible to get jobs other than English teacher. Japanese isn't that narrow, half the credits aren't even for language modules. And yes, they are all about Japan or some other East Asian country, but the generic 'skills' gained are no different from a degree like history or english where most of the graduates end up doing nothing related to their degree. Though if you were hoping to do something more specialist than business, tourism, civil service etc. like banking or law then it would be a good idea to do a joint degree with Economics, History etc. though not doing so doesn't make it impossible.
    For people who take degrees where a job isn't highly likely at the end (generally non-sciences) then University is the time to network and sell yourself like those hoes next to Opal in Sheffield. :teehee:
    Apply for internships and work experience and all that jazz.

    What were you hoping to do?
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    (Original post by Susant)
    What were you hoping to do?
    I have been considering my options for a career after uni, however I'm not certain which one I would take. I applied for Japanese Studies, which I may still do, but I am considering whether changing to Linguistics and Japanese Studies would be a better choice for career oppertunities after the course. It could lead to entrepreneuring, or a role where there's a lot of critical thinking involved. Hmmm
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    (Original post by Digital_Love)
    I have been considering my options for a career after uni, however I'm not certain which one I would take. I applied for Japanese Studies, which I may still do, but I am considering whether changing to Linguistics and Japanese Studies would be a better choice for career oppertunities after the course. It could lead to entrepreneuring, or a role where there's a lot of critical thinking involved. Hmmm
    If you want to, go for it

    Quite a few linguists end up in publishing, which is what I think you said you wanted back in the Sheffield Japanese thread. Seeing as you've firmed Sheffield, you could also ask them to switch you to Management and Japanese if you want something else.
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    Uh, hi all I'm so glad to see so many other Japanese applicants!

    I've applied for Japanese & Cultural studies at Newcastle. Fortunately got a conditional offer~

    I'm not a total beginner to Japanese however... I've studied it by myself for 6 years. x_________x Currently at conversational level, I really want to work with the language as a career and/or live and work there eventually so I thought taking a degree in it would be the next logical step. (:

    Any other Newcastle applicants? : ) How are people's exams going? Looking forward to starting it? Any one else already got a bit experience in Japanese?

    Haha sorry for the silly amount of questions Q_Q
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    (Original post by Aijin)
    Uh, hi all I'm so glad to see so many other Japanese applicants!

    I've applied for Japanese & Cultural studies at Newcastle. Fortunately got a conditional offer~

    I'm not a total beginner to Japanese however... I've studied it by myself for 6 years. x_________x Currently at conversational level, I really want to work with the language as a career and/or live and work there eventually so I thought taking a degree in it would be the next logical step. (:

    Any other Newcastle applicants? : ) How are people's exams going? Looking forward to starting it? Any one else already got a bit experience in Japanese?

    Haha sorry for the silly amount of questions Q_Q

    I`m a newcastle applicant I have an unconditional offer for linguistics with Japanese (also had an offer for Japanese & cultural studies but I really wanted to study linguistics)
    How far is your japanese? can you read and write hiragana and katakana?
    If you want to practice your written japanese with someone, I`d be more than happy to exchange emails with you
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    (Original post by IBzombie)
    I`m a newcastle applicant I have an unconditional offer for linguistics with Japanese (also had an offer for Japanese & cultural studies but I really wanted to study linguistics)
    How far is your japanese? can you read and write hiragana and katakana?
    If you want to practice your written japanese with someone, I`d be more than happy to exchange emails with you
    Hi!
    I can read hiragana, katakana and Kanji. : ) I think my kanji is at 1000-1100 now. I don't keep record haha I just learn as I read.
    It'd be awesome to practice with someone! I have penpals but with exams I'm too busy to keep up with them x_x' But yeah, I'm definitely up for exchanging emails~ : )
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    (Original post by Aijin)
    Hi!
    I can read hiragana, katakana and Kanji. : ) I think my kanji is at 1000-1100 now. I don't keep record haha I just learn as I read.
    It'd be awesome to practice with someone! I have penpals but with exams I'm too busy to keep up with them x_x' But yeah, I'm definitely up for exchanging emails~ : )
    My Kanji knowledge isn`t so great, but my writing skills are good
    I am actually in Japan right now studying the language I`ve been here since February... It really is amazing
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    (Original post by IBzombie)
    My Kanji knowledge isn`t so great, but my writing skills are good
    I am actually in Japan right now studying the language I`ve been here since February... It really is amazing
    Yeah, I noticed your location - Fukuoka! Lucky! : ) How are things there?
    Are you on an exchange or home stay? I haven't been to Japan yet. ;_; I would murder to be able to go ~ But alas, it's too pricey. ._.
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    (Original post by Aijin)
    Yeah, I noticed your location - Fukuoka! Lucky! : ) How are things there?
    Are you on an exchange or home stay? I haven't been to Japan yet. ;_; I would murder to be able to go ~ But alas, it's too pricey. ._.
    Things in Fukuoka are completely fine, totally unaffected by what happened in March
    It`s my favourite city
    Right now I live in a shared apartment and attend a small language school, next week I move to Sapporo to study there
    The language isn`t easy, but it is fun to learn
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    (Original post by IBzombie)
    Things in Fukuoka are completely fine, totally unaffected by what happened in March
    It`s my favourite city
    Right now I live in a shared apartment and attend a small language school, next week I move to Sapporo to study there
    The language isn`t easy, but it is fun to learn
    Ah~ so lucky! : )
    It's so fun learning Japanese : ) I'm completely self taught so I usually just chat with Japanese / read websites in Japanese so that makes it really fun haha. But being able to study in Japan must be awesome, being surrounded by it daily. D; I bet you'll be near fluent! : )
    By the way, should I PM you my email and we can chat in Japanese via email or PM? <<awkwardly worded question haha>>

    Glad to hear Fukuoka was unaffected. I want to go to Kansai on my year abroad... I'm in love with Kyoto and Kansai-ben haha~~ I'm scared if I go to live in Tokyo, it'll lose it's charm. So I want to live in a different city and go there for like weekends so it never loses it "Oh my, I'm in Tokyo!" charm hahaa. Also probably go there for a lot of J-Rock concerts tehee.

    Sapporo~ Looks like a great city. (: Hope the move goes smoothly! ^^
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    (Original post by Digital_Love)
    Why do you put Japanese Studies down so bad? It is a highly academic degree, are you saying it's only worth something if you become fluent?
    Obviously - the majority of jobs that require the use of Japanese language demand level N1 in the International Japanese Language Proficiency Test - that's the top level. It's pretty much useless for a job that actually uses Japanese if you're below that.
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    (Original post by Digital_Love)
    Why do you put Japanese Studies down so bad? It is a highly academic degree, are you saying it's only worth something if you become fluent?
    Thank you for telling my degree is highly academic, but I think that considering I am the one WITH the degree, you aren't really in much of a position to tell me.

    Lets face it, it isn't worth much if you aren't fluent in it, not in the job market.
    Here's why:
    If you want to apply to jobs using your degree, most of them are looking for fluent Japanese speakers.
    Employer: What is your degree?
    You: Japanese Studies
    Employer: Oh, so you speak Japanese
    You; Not really...

    Also, there is not much you can do with a Japanese degree other than language jobs. So therefore, yes, it is useless if your Japanese is mediocre and you want to go into something else.. because bottom line is, you can't. If you really want to ignore my advice and take Japanese at Manchester then I suggest you at least take another subject along side it, give yourself SOME chance in life.

    You get my point?
    Sure its useful in terms of the fact I can speak a bit of Japanese.
    But really, after spending near £40 k and putting A LOT of hard work into it, you would expect to be a little closer to fluent.

    As the other poster said, I'm not asking to be native fluent. But some people on our course can barely string a sentence together... after 4 years of so called teaching. If you can't see the problem with that then there is no helping you.

    Please come back and speak to me when you, too, have a useless degree. There is nothing academic about what I have been doing for the last 4 years.
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    (Original post by rh209230)
    rawr
    I'm sure you're very pissed off at being let down by them, but you might want to check if the person you quoted was actually talking about Manchester, or even applying there before dropping da bomb on them.

    I thought Manchester was supposed to be good, but I suppose that's the risk you take with a new course that hasn't had results yet :dontknow: Hopefully, it'll get better over time, but I doubt that'll be much consolation for yourself.
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    Hi, I'm interested in self teaching either Japanese or Chinese.

    Which one would you guys say is easier? Is a person whose native language is English more likely to become near fluent in Japanese or Chinese?

    Thanks a lot
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    (Original post by yabbayabba)
    Hi, I'm interested in self teaching either Japanese or Chinese.

    Which one would you guys say is easier? Is a person whose native language is English more likely to become near fluent in Japanese or Chinese?

    Thanks a lot
    I've self-taught myself Japanese for 6 years and I found it to be quite easy. I've also dabbled with Mandarin but I found that to be much more challenging, mainly the tones really tripped me up. It really depends on the person, I think. Any one can become "near fluent" in either of the languages, both of them have an equal learning curve in my opinion. With Japanese, it's the grammar and with Chinese it's the characters/tones (in my opinion!) I don't think there is an easier one but, I've heard people say that Chinese is easier because the grammar is less complicated than Japanese. Japanese has an S-O-V (Subject-Object-Verb) sentence structure (English is S-V-O (Subject Verb Object)) whilst Chinese generally follows S-V-O but I think it gets a little more diverse as you progress through the language, but people say it's a lot easier to grasp since it follows the same set up as English.

    But as they are both East Asian languages, for a native English speaker they'll be about as equally as hard. Just my two cents.
 
 
 
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