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    Hi,
    I am going to do the Primary Ed course at university this year. I am also interested in doing the intensive celta course that you can complete in about 4 weeks. Does anyone know whether it would become useful primary ed?
    and would I still have to pay the full fees, even though i would be a full time student?
    thanks in advance!
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    Hi, they do an extension of the CELTA now which is aimed at teaching kids

    http://www.cambridgeesol.org/exams/t...ds/celtyl.html

    Everyone has to pay for the CELTA, well as far as I am aware, as it is taught in private academies.
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    thank you sirwhale28!
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    (Original post by Refina)
    Hi,
    I am going to do the Primary Ed course at university this year. I am also interested in doing the intensive celta course that you can complete in about 4 weeks. Does anyone know whether it would become useful primary ed?
    and would I still have to pay the full fees, even though i would be a full time student?
    thanks in advance!
    I have a CELTA qualification and I'm doing a primary PGCE at the moment.

    I think it depends what you're interested in and why you're doing it - if you're really interested in EAL in school and perhaps want to work as a school coordinator in this area, then its worth having as obviously, the background of the CELTA course means you're more able to deal with EAL students. This is the avenue I intend to go down and also teach English to adult learners as well, so the CELTA course for me is something worth having and as my undergrad degree was in linguistics it strongly relates to my interest in languages and English. If you're just doing it because it will look good and its an additional qualification then I'd reconsider as its almost £1000 (no student discount!) and very very very intensive. You really need to love it to do it as you lose your entire life to CELTA for a month which is much easier said than done. I found it much more stressful than I've found my PGCE/teaching practice on PGCE to be so far.

    However, the CELTA course is entirely adult learner based, you do very very little on young learners and as has been said, there is an additional qualification but how easy it is to find a centre doing it is another matter. I've been looking and can only find the course offered at a number of centres in the country and the staff at the college where I did my CELTA course didn't know of anywhere in Scotland where I could do the young learners add on. You need to have the CELTA qualification to do the young learners one, obviously.

    As a general class teacher, you will have an EAL coordinator within the school who deals with the EAL kids and their IEPs/additional learning needs. The teacher I'm working with at the moment has had EAL training through the school as my school has a high percentage of kids with EAL, you're not expected to "know it all" and its also covered in your course. As I said, a CELTA qualification is an asset but only if you're genuinely interested in teaching English as a foreign language and may end up going down this route instead. If you're not, then don't bother, the extra knowledge it gives you on TEFL is more in terms of how you teach a specific English language class to adult learners of different L1s in a language school rather than how to teach children in a mainstream primary school setting.
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    I have to agree with what oxymoronic has said. Unless you intend on teaching children or adults from different L1s there's probably little/no point. Perhaps look into adult evening classes in childcare, health and safety, first aid etc. You could also look into creative arts development courses, as far as I know primary ed. involves loads of arts and crafts?

    (BTW I have a Trinity TESOL)
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    (Original post by Cuckoo91)
    You could also look into creative arts development courses, as far as I know primary ed. involves loads of arts and crafts
    If you count having 4 year olds cover themselves in glue and then enthusiastically stick paper to it in creative play, then yes, we do arts and crafts! :p: There is very little time for arts/crafts, its a very minor subject and most schools fit in art for an hour or so a week, if that as there's so much else we have to do. The NC says they should be exposed to a variety of different media so its a case of doing chalk one week, paint the next, pencils the next!

    But yes, in terms of the OP - I agree with you. There are much better ways to spend £1000 and a month of your life if you're just looking at adding to your skills base as a primary school teacher. A sports qualification, or a language skill would be a much better thing to do as then you could offer it as an after school/lunch time club plus it'd benefit you're teaching seeing as both of these are part of the regular NC.
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    I worked with kids aged 2-6 in China for 7 months, and we did insane amounts of arts and crafts. But I guess the main difference is, that was in China
 
 
 
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