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    I graduated from university just under 2 years ago with a BSc Physics 2.1 and have been working in IT for about a year and half.

    I want to move into scientific programming but have limitted skills in that area. So I am think of going back to university to do a masters in Scientific programming.

    Will this improve my career prospects?

    Also it took me 5 months to find work after graduating and I'm scared I would be out of work again after completing my masters?

    Anyone done similar?
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    Hi

    Same here. I graduated two years ago with a 2.1 in English language teaching and linguistics..worked for two years...and now doing full time masters which is useful for abroad working. So for me its worth it...
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    What do you mean by scientific programming? Do you mean mathematical-based basic research & development work? Or being part of a software engineering team that builds robust software based on R&D prototypes for a science & technology company/institution? The latter just requires good software engineering experience whilst the former may require further study (possibly at doctoral level in some fields).
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    I have had a look at the Scientific programming course at Nottingham and it seems have a lot of vocational elements.

    Somewhere in between, I want to developing software to solve mathematical problems i.e. using algothims and mathematical techniques.

    The sort of jobs I'm looking at afterwards would be similar to:

    Research and Development i.e. say at NATS
    (http://natscareers.co.uk/pages/gradu...velopment.html)

    Graduate software developer for tessella
    (http://www.tessella.com/2010/09/grad...are-engineers/)

    Mathematical developer for spiral software.
    (http://www.spiralsoft.co.uk/Mathemat...nguage=English)

    But I currently don't have the requirements there looking for.
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    I think you're probably looking at having to do a doctorate in the future in order to get the research experience. I know people at all three companies and they all have PhDs. There are non-PhDs but they tend to be more involved with software implementation rather than algorithm design and research.
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    I'm not sure I want spend 3/4 years doing a PHD.

    Will doing a the scientific computing masters course at Nottingham or similar help me get into these firms or similar even if it's in a software implementation role?

    Course details
    http://programmespec.nottingham.ac.u...year_id=000110
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    For software implementation roles it is possible that you could apply without the Masters if you have strong development experience as part of your current job.

    For roles, like in the maths group at Spiral, these are dominated by PhDs (Spiral was founded by Cambridge PhDs in physics and mathematics). Unfortunately a one year Masters is often insufficient to provide the expertise and experience needed for these types of jobs and many companies (particularly small ones) will principally recruit PhDs. Larger organisations (like NATS) may have more routes in for non-PhDs in to scientific roles and you may want to research which university they have recruited from in the past to get an idea of what courses are favoured.
 
 
 
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