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    (Original post by thejonsmith)
    Possibly, but I don't really see the relevance of the finance sector.

    Also, off topic slightly, what did you attain in your degree, and what was your CV like in terms of legal experience, to secure your TC? I'll be off to the College of Law (or similar) next year, so it'd be a useful comparison (although I'll be doing the BPTC).
    I don't know how much info you want... I had quite a bit of legal work experience: I did a vacation scheme with Allen & Overy and I'd previously worked for Lovells (as it then was) as their campus manager. I've also done the whole shadowing barristers/ judges and a couple of placements with the CPS when I was contemplating the bar a few years ago.

    I averaged a 1 in my first year and a solid 2.1 in my second. Straight "A" and "A*" grades at GCSE and A2 level (pretty sure they don't look at these in too much detail though)! My ECs were pretty standard - I was head boy at college, I've done quite a bit of pro bono work, I'm into swimming and I'm currently helping my lecturer write a textbook on EU property law. Most firms seemed to be more interested in the latter than anything else!

    (Original post by vnupe)
    Well you know what they say, 'with age comes wisdom'... plus I take you to be about 21-23 y.o. And if you respond excitedly (in a bad way) about 23, then I would say closer to 21..
    You would be spot on! :o:
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    (Original post by SK-mar)
    I was just thinking Mr Deeds, surely all of the russell group uni's have good employment prospects and you have a good chance, depending on your academic performance at these uni's, of getting a TC at a top firm (even magic circle)?!

    I think a person with a 2:1 from warwick in competition with someone with a 2:1 from, say, liverpool would both be considered equally, yet other factors will come into play to make the decision. The university won't be the deciding factor. That is for all russell group / top 20 unis!
    I think you're absolutely right. The reputation of your university is important (particularly in the legal sector and more so at the bar) but the difference between the top schools is negligible. Unfortunately, though, that's something which seems to get overlooked here. :yep:
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    (Original post by SamKar)
    KCL and Durham would come after the 'big 6' in terms of city recruiting
    But yes, durham and KCL have excellent law departments that are targetted more by city law firms rather than financial institutions
    Sure about that?

    Disregard financial institutions for the time being, considering this is specifically in relation to law. KCL has one of the highest graduate employment rates, especially in Law. Likewise, the city firms and chambers target a lot of 'networking' opportunities at KCL. Looking through firms and chambers' members shows there's as many KCL and Durham graduates as there are from UCL and LSE.

    Obviously, UCL and LSE edge King's in the world rankings (although it's still in the top 25) and Durham, but this "big 6" group is both entirely subjective and not particularly accurate. Especially as Imperial doesn't feature whatsoever when we're talking about Law graduates.
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    OK, let's just settle this.

    Strand Poly is good for law, but useless for most other things...
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    I don't know how much info you want... I had quite a bit of legal work experience: I did a vacation scheme with Allen & Overy and I'd previously worked for Lovells (as it then was) as their campus manager. I've also done the whole shadowing barristers/ judges and a couple of placements with the CPS when I was contemplating the bar a few years ago.

    I averaged a 1 in my first year and a solid 2.1 in my second. Straight "A" and "A*" grades at GCSE and A2 level (pretty sure they don't look at these in too much detail though)! My ECs were pretty standard - I was head boy at college, I've done quite a bit of pro bono work, I'm into swimming and I'm currently helping my lecturer write a textbook on EU property law. Most firms seemed to be more interested in the latter than anything else!
    That's certainly a formidable CV!

    Out of interest, what made you choose Warwick, given the straight As?

    I've currently done a month-long mini-pupillage with a chambers in Australia, and am doing several mini-pupillages at chambers during this year (hopefully with more to come, as the dates for application have yet to pass). Beyond that, I've done mooting and am applying for the uni mooting 'team', likewise I've got several attainments of a fairly high level in sports... but it's certainly something that could do with plenty more work. How did you get into the position of writing a textbook?
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    (Original post by Focus08)
    OK, let's just settle this.

    Strand Poly is good for law, but useless for most other things...
    :facepalm2:

    Are you 14 years old?
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    I think you're absolutely right. The reputation of your university is important (particularly in the legal sector and more so at the bar) but the difference between the top schools is negligible. Unfortunately, though, that's something which seems to get overlooked here. :yep:
    yes I completely agree with you on that, it does get overlooked on TSR because everyone is not only striving for the best, but hoping to 'beat' everyone else by making sure they get into a top 5 uni even though, at crunch time, its not going to make much difference if your in a top 20 / russell group university.

    I am still undecided but i think i'm applying for Law at Exeter, Liverpool, UEA and 'Law and politics' at Exeter and Cardiff. I was just wandering, from your experience, if i was to gain exemptions for LPC and BAR after completing 'law and politics' or just applied with 'law and politics' on its own (providing i got a 2:1) would I still have a good chance of gaining a TC with a top firm, compared to some straight law students. I was browsing through the 'Allen and Ovary' recruitment page and it seems some people obtained training contracts after doing degrees such as geography or history ?? thanks in advance ...
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    No, SamKar was talking about a group of 6 targeted unis (and this discussion was somehow steered into general City recruitment).

    Goldman Sachs wouldn't target a place with 400 midwives/nurses. For law, as established, it's a different ballgame..
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    (Original post by thejonsmith)
    That's certainly a formidable CV!

    Out of interest, what made you choose Warwick, given the straight As?

    I've currently done a month-long mini-pupillage with a chambers in Australia, and am doing several mini-pupillages at chambers during this year (hopefully with more to come, as the dates for application have yet to pass). Beyond that, I've done mooting and am applying for the uni mooting 'team', likewise I've got several attainments of a fairly high level in sports... but it's certainly something that could do with plenty more work. How did you get into the position of writing a textbook?
    Thanks, and likewise! It must be pretty cool working in Australia for a month!

    I was choosing between UCL, Nottingham and Warwick as my firm. It ultimately boiled down to the fact that I had decided I probably wouldn't enjoy being a student in London and I preferred the course structure at Warwick where law is taught in its social context.

    My lecturer asked if I'd help him with the textbook - I came the top of my year for property law so he thought I'd be interested. It's been a lot more difficult than I thought, though, the EU side of it has been pretty intense!

    (Original post by SK-mar)
    yes I completely agree with you on that, it does get overlooked on TSR because everyone is not only striving for the best, but hoping to 'beat' everyone else by making sure they get into a top 5 uni even though, at crunch time, its not going to make much difference if your in a top 20 / russell group university.

    I am still undecided but i think i'm applying for Law at Exeter, Liverpool, UEA and 'Law and politics' at Exeter and Cardiff. I was just wandering, from your experience, if i was to gain exemptions for LPC and BAR after completing 'law and politics' or just applied with 'law and politics' on its own (providing i got a 2:1) would I still have a good chance of gaining a TC with a top firm, compared to some straight law students. I was browsing through the 'Allen and Ovary' recruitment page and it seems some people obtained training contracts after doing degrees such as geography or history ?? thanks in advance ...
    The top city firms generally have an equal split of law and non-law graduates. Some even recruit more heavily from amongst students applying with a non-law degree. You tend to find that about 50% of lawyers at firms like Allen & Overy will have studied subjects like English, History and Economics at degree level. In short, you certainly won't be at any disadvantage with a degree in law and/or politics!

    As a side note, it's not possible to gain exemption from the LPC or the BPTC. These are compulsory courses for all budding solicitors and barristers regardless of their undergraduate qualifications.
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    Thanks, and likewise! It must be pretty cool working in Australia for a month!

    I was choosing between UCL, Nottingham and Warwick as my firm. It ultimately boiled down to the fact that I had decided I probably wouldn't enjoy being a student in London and I preferred the course structure at Warwick where law is taught in its social context.

    My lecturer asked if I'd help him with the textbook - I came the top of my year for property law so he thought I'd be interested. It's been a lot more difficult than I thought, though, the EU side of it has been pretty intense!



    The top city firms generally have an equal split of law and non-law graduates. Some even recruit more heavily from amongst students applying with a non-law degree. You tend to find that about 50% of lawyers at firms like Allen & Overy will have studied subjects like English, History and Economics at degree level. In short, you certainly won't be at any disadvantage with a degree in law and/or politics!

    As a side note, it's not possible to gain exemption from the LPC or the BPTC. These are compulsory courses for all budding solicitors and barristers regardless of their undergraduate qualifications.
    yeah sorry I meant gaining exemptions from doing the LPC or BPTC exams. If i was to do law and politics and exeter which is a BA degree, then i would need to do a further year of intense study in solely Law so that i could then complete either the LPC or BPTC if i chose to become a solicitor or barrister. cheers though!!
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    (Original post by SK-mar)
    yeah sorry I meant gaining exemptions from doing the LPC or BPTC exams. If i was to do law and politics and exeter which is a BA degree, then i would need to do a further year of intense study in solely Law so that i could then complete either the LPC or BPTC if i chose to become a solicitor or barrister. cheers though!!
    Yeah, that's the GDL/CPE (conversion course) - from what I gather, it's pretty intense! You're welcome, and good luck !
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    Thanks, and likewise! It must be pretty cool working in Australia for a month!

    I was choosing between UCL, Nottingham and Warwick as my firm. It ultimately boiled down to the fact that I had decided I probably wouldn't enjoy being a student in London and I preferred the course structure at Warwick where law is taught in its social context.

    My lecturer asked if I'd help him with the textbook - I came the top of my year for property law so he thought I'd be interested. It's been a lot more difficult than I thought, though, the EU side of it has been pretty intense!
    It was certainly well worth doing, despite how cold it was in Sydney!

    Ah, fair enough. I thought Oxbridge might also have been contemplated.

    I can imagine it being an arduous process; will you be credited as an author of the book?

    Also, what did you attain in the LPC? (i.e Outstanding, Very Competent etc).
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    (Original post by thejonsmith)
    It was certainly well worth doing, despite how cold it was in Sydney!

    Ah, fair enough. I thought Oxbridge might also have been contemplated.

    I can imagine it being an arduous process; will you be credited as an author of the book?

    Also, what did you attain in the LPC? (i.e Outstanding, Very Competent etc).
    I'll hopefully be credited but it would be crazy to class me as a co-author! I haven't completed the LPC yet. My money's on "very incompetent" when I do come to it, though :p:!
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    I'll hopefully be credited but it would be crazy to class me as a co-author! I haven't completed the LPC yet. My money's on "very incompetent" when I do come to it, though :p:!
    :teehee:

    Does the firm require any sort of grade - i.e Competent, Very Competent?

    Also, have you secured the TC conditionally on the basis of your LPC classification?
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    (Original post by thejonsmith)
    :teehee:

    Does the firm require any sort of grade - i.e Competent, Very Competent?

    Also, have you secured the TC conditionally on the basis of your LPC classification?
    The condition is that I pass the LPC. Most people do so I'm hoping that won't be too much of an issue. :lol:
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    I think we need a sticky thread JUST for debating how good QM is as it seems to be the topic of TOO many threads and it's getting repetitive!
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    I was waiting for that :p:! There's an article on the Times' website which discussed this in detail. Unfortunately, as with much of the site, you now have to pay to view it.

    To illustrate my point. For 2010 entry QMUL received approximately 3,000 applicants for 215 places on their law programme. That works out at 1:13. For 2008 entry Warwick's application to place ratio was 1:24.

    And yes, I'm a final year. Starting my LPC/training contract next.

    I heard it was 4000 applications for 215 places!
    You may be right though, do you have the source?
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    I heard it was 4000 applications for 215 places!
    You may be right though, do you have the source?
    Q: How many places do you have each year?
    A. We have approximately 215 places available on our undergraduate Law courses. We receive in the region of 3,000 applications each year.
    Source: http://www.law.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/admissions/faq/
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    (Original post by Mr_Deeds)
    Source: http://www.law.qmul.ac.uk/undergraduate/admissions/faq/

    Yeah I think this year they receieved 4000+, just probably because of the 'current' (ever changing) league tables, they seem to influence people's decisions, albeit stupidly.

    This year, is QM's largest ever intake of law students, with an excess of 300 students on the LLB course!
    I wouldn't like to know the fines from the government if 215 was their quota :/
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    (Original post by Jakko247)
    Yeah I think this year they receieved 4000+, just probably because of the 'current' (ever changing) league tables, they seem to influence people's decisions, abeit stupidly.

    This year, is QM's largest ever intake of law students, with an excess of 300 students on the LLB course!
    I wouldn't like to know the fines from the government if 215 was their quota :/
    I think that's the picture at every university up and down the country. Places were definitely at a premium this year ! Still, QM have definitely made massive progress in recent times and you'd be splitting hairs in trying to distinguish it from the other top law schools.
 
 
 
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