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    (Original post by student777)
    ?? Have you actually talked to any doctors, or medical students, or anyone interested in a career in medicine? :facepalm2:

    If they really wanted the money, they would go into banking. More money, more quickly.
    But they're guaranteed a job with Medicine.
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    Originally Posted by ORGAN
    What part of training?
    Even during foundation or specialty training Doctors make more than most engineers and scientists make at that stage of their career.

    Redraft that so it actually makes some sense.
    Sorry English not my first language. I wanted to say something like Edison, "Not at all. Now, I definitely know more than a thousand ways how NOT to make a light bulb."

    Is anyone actually a doctor that can tell me what doctor's earn because all my knowledge is form ****
    Come on its the nhsemployers.org website and every other source tells same figures. If you know more please enlighten us.
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    (Original post by the666thmessiah)
    I agree. Doctors are like footballers;
    Wow. Just wow. :facepalm:
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    ...But surely physicists have killed soooooo many people at the same time as saving people so they should have to pay money :p:
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    A lot of butt hurt here

    After 3 pages, i'm suprised no one has quoted the direct NHS pay for doctors:

    Pay for doctors

    This page describes the pay for doctors from 1st April 2010.

    Doctors in training
    Doctors in training earn a basic salary and will be paid a supplement if they work more than 40 hours and/or work outside the hours of 7am-7pm Monday to Friday.

    In the most junior hospital trainee post (Foundation Year 1) the basic starting salary is £22,412. This increases in Foundation Year 2 to £27,798. For a doctor in specialist training the basic starting salary is £29,705. If the doctor is contracted to work more than 40 hours and/or to work outside 7am-7pm Monday to Friday, they will receive an additional supplement which will normally be between 20% and 50% of basic salary. This supplement is based on the extra hours worked above a 40 hour standard working week and the intensity of the work.

    Specialty doctor and associate specialist (2008) (SAS doctors)
    Doctors in the new specialty doctor grade earn between £36,807 and £70,126. See www.nhsemployers.org/sas for more details
    Consultants
    Consultants can earn between £74,504 to £176,242, dependent on length of service and payment of additional performance related awards. This figure is unchanged from April 2009.
    General practitioners
    Many general practitioners (GPs) are self employed and hold contracts, either on their own or as part of a partnership, with their local primary care trust (PCT). The profit of GPs varies according to the services they provide for their patients and the way they choose to provide these services.

    Salaried GPs employed directly by PCTs earn between £53,781 to £81,158, dependent on, among other factors, length of service and experience


    It is not much at all compared to the training involed and is leading to a large amount of emigration to places where doctors are paid better
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    This is such non-sense. It's really all about where you want the smartest kids to go. Do you want them to be your doctor? Pay them well then. Do you want them to be a lawyer or banker? Well the ones who want them to be will pay them well.
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    (Original post by the666thmessiah)

    And yes, I do know that, because when I was considering it, I was considering it for the money, as were/are my friends who are doing it or applying for it now.
    Consdering the stress, work load and incredible educational requirements I doubt anyone who is going to make a half decent doctor is doing it just for the money.

    If they were then I doubt they will last.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    A lot of butt hurt here

    After 3 pages, i'm suprised no one has quoted the direct NHS pay for doctors:

    Pay for doctors

    This page describes the pay for doctors from 1st April 2010.

    Doctors in training
    Doctors in training earn a basic salary and will be paid a supplement if they work more than 40 hours and/or work outside the hours of 7am-7pm Monday to Friday.

    In the most junior hospital trainee post (Foundation Year 1) the basic starting salary is £22,412. This increases in Foundation Year 2 to £27,798. For a doctor in specialist training the basic starting salary is £29,705. If the doctor is contracted to work more than 40 hours and/or to work outside 7am-7pm Monday to Friday, they will receive an additional supplement which will normally be between 20% and 50% of basic salary. This supplement is based on the extra hours worked above a 40 hour standard working week and the intensity of the work.

    Specialty doctor and associate specialist (2008) (SAS doctors)
    Doctors in the new specialty doctor grade earn between £36,807 and £70,126. See www.nhsemployers.org/sas for more details
    Consultants
    Consultants can earn between £74,504 to £176,242, dependent on length of service and payment of additional performance related awards. This figure is unchanged from April 2009.
    General practitioners
    Many general practitioners (GPs) are self employed and hold contracts, either on their own or as part of a partnership, with their local primary care trust (PCT). The profit of GPs varies according to the services they provide for their patients and the way they choose to provide these services.

    Salaried GPs employed directly by PCTs earn between £53,781 to £81,158, dependent on, among other factors, length of service and experience


    It is not much at all compared to the training involed and is leading to a large amount of emigration to places where doctors are paid better
    A BSc, MSc , Phd ,Post Doc takes as much time and effort but gets paid not even near to the figures quoted for doctors.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    How many scientists do you think actually go on to make such a discovery? Very few.
    To be fair to scientists, the big breakthroughs and discoveries are in improving/developing techniques and testing, rather than developing new medicines, but these have just as big an impact on patient survival as new medicines do. Many scientists are involved in improving and developing new tests, so it's ridiculous to try and trivialise their progress.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    A lot of butt hurt here

    After 3 pages, i'm suprised no one has quoted the direct NHS pay for doctors:

    Pay for doctors

    This page describes the pay for doctors from 1st April 2010.

    Doctors in training
    Doctors in training earn a basic salary and will be paid a supplement if they work more than 40 hours and/or work outside the hours of 7am-7pm Monday to Friday.

    In the most junior hospital trainee post (Foundation Year 1) the basic starting salary is £22,412. This increases in Foundation Year 2 to £27,798. For a doctor in specialist training the basic starting salary is £29,705. If the doctor is contracted to work more than 40 hours and/or to work outside 7am-7pm Monday to Friday, they will receive an additional supplement which will normally be between 20% and 50% of basic salary. This supplement is based on the extra hours worked above a 40 hour standard working week and the intensity of the work.

    Specialty doctor and associate specialist (2008) (SAS doctors)
    Doctors in the new specialty doctor grade earn between £36,807 and £70,126. See www.nhsemployers.org/sas for more details
    Consultants
    Consultants can earn between £74,504 to £176,242, dependent on length of service and payment of additional performance related awards. This figure is unchanged from April 2009.
    General practitioners
    Many general practitioners (GPs) are self employed and hold contracts, either on their own or as part of a partnership, with their local primary care trust (PCT). The profit of GPs varies according to the services they provide for their patients and the way they choose to provide these services.

    Salaried GPs employed directly by PCTs earn between £53,781 to £81,158, dependent on, among other factors, length of service and experience


    It is not much at all compared to the training involed and is leading to a large amount of emigration to places where doctors are paid better
    A BSc,MSc , PhD, post doc take as much time and effort and dont get near the salary quoted for doctors.
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    To be fair to scientists, the big breakthroughs and discoveries are in improving/developing techniques and testing, rather than developing new medicines. But these have just as big an impact on patient survival as new medicines do. Many scientists are involved in improving and developing new tests, so it's ridiculous to try and trivialise their progress.
    To be fair to scientists, most of the big breakthroughs in medical science, the ones that don't make the Daily Mail, are made by medics.
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    Fact is - we're always going to need doctors, someone has to do it!
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    (Original post by Renal)
    To be fair to scientists, most of the big breakthroughs in medical science, the ones that don't make the Daily Mail, are made by medics.
    This might well be the case but most doctors I personally know treat patients and are not involved in research, I thought most of the research was carried out by medical scientists who might well have had a Doctor's Training but did not practice and went into research full time. If some one knows more about this can you please tell.
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    (Original post by fletchdd02)
    Fact is - we're always going to need doctors, someone has to do it!
    Don't give this as a reason for you wanting to become a Doctor in the interview.
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    I think senior doctors are quite generously paid - largely due to supply and demand.

    But it takes up to 6 years at university, followed by a minimum of 8-9 years as a postgraduate trainee, to reach consultant status. Junior doctors are not particularly well paid (per hour) - especially when you consider that many/most juniors will do many hours of unpaid overtime each week. When I was newly qualified I estimate that I worked over 70 hours each week, and sometimes much more, for a take-home pay of under £20,000.

    On occasion I had to make complicated, difficult decisions within an extremely short time-frame of seconds- minutes, to avoid death or permanent disability, eg when managing patients with a cardiac or respiratory arrest. Any mistakes I made could easily have been fatal, since I was diagnosing life-threatening conditions on at least a daily basis, prescribing drugs that in overdose could readily be fatal, and performing procedures such as chest drains, lumbar punctures and central venous lines, which could readily have had fatal complications if I had been careless.

    While I totally agree that many scientific careers are as academically challenging as medicine, and in some cases more so, almost no scientists have the same opportunities to kill people with the slightest slip as doctors do from the day they qualify.

    Scientists are definitely underpaid - but the extra pay that doctors get is perhaps best seen as danger-money for those 3am life-or-death situations that no scientist has to deal with.
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    We should pay bin men more, without them we'd die in a huge pile of rubbish.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    To be fair to scientists, most of the big breakthroughs in medical science, the ones that don't make the Daily Mail, are made by medics.
    I work in transplantation, so I can't really comment on medical science in general, but the big transplantation discoveries were made by either scientists (in the 'rules' of transplantation, storage of organs and monitoring post-transplant) or surgeons (surgical techniques). Before a small group of scientists focused on the subject in the 70s, doctors were pretty much shoving organs in with trial and error. Doctors such as Starzl and McIndoe were vital to transplantation's progress, but without the science doctors would still be working blind. There is absolutely no way in hell that patient survival figures could improve to a substantial degree without the developments in science. That still goes for today; doctors need to phone in to the transplant lab before they know whether to transplant. Cut out the scientist's role and doctors are back to having lots of patients die. So in regards to transplantation, it's very much equal between surgeons and scientists.

    Science and medicine rely on each other. Medicine can't go it alone. Too often these threads degrade into belittling each other's jobs, which is utter nonsense.
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    (Original post by the666thmessiah)
    I agree. Doctors are like footballers; they shouldnt get as much as they do.

    Officers in the military make life and death deicisions of at least 20 men per decision every day, but get a quarter of what most doctors get; plus im sure its harder to be an officer in the military than it is to be a doctor (you have to be smart AND fit AND alot more).

    Biomedical scientists and Chemists are the ones who discover and produce the medicines that Doctors ride the white horse on, so they effectively save alot more people than a doctor does in his lifetime.

    Firemen risk their lives to save peoples lives, AND have to make life or death decisions; and their life is far more stressful.

    As for scientists in further training, yes, I agree.. they also typically, all be it, indirectly, save more people than a doctor does.
    So yes, Doctors shouldnt get paid as much as they should... Hell the high pay is the reason 99% of doctors are doing what they are doing; few do it because they like the subject/apparent challenge/want to care for others.

    Surely, firemen, chemists and scientists should be paid more, not doctors paid less...
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    (Original post by darksolidus.snake)
    Don't give this as a reason for you wanting to become a Doctor in the interview.
    Don't worry, most things I was going to say in this thread have been covered by other TSR users!
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    (Original post by Organ)
    I know a doctor, who after six years of medical school and two years of foundation training, and has taken numerous post-graduate exams - he is now aged 30 and is on around £32,000 ~ do you know the wages of doctors, or are you just going off Holby City?



    You don't have to be that smart, my mate is going in with AS levels. The number of people in the country who can complete officer training is much higher than those who can complete medical training. Your post doesn't even make sense 'least 20 men per decision every day' :wtf: If your going to make some **** argument, at least chink together the braincells to form coherent sentences. Although with your levels of critical thinking, I can understand that being a challenge.



    Most doctors could be firemen, most firemen couldn't be doctors.



    You know that do you?
    +rep

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