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    (Original post by darksolidus.snake)
    This might well be the case but most doctors I personally know treat patients and are not involved in research, I thought most of the research was carried out by medical scientists who might well have had a Doctor's Training but did not practice and went into research full time. If some one knows more about this can you please tell.
    As you're well aware, most of the research conducted in medicine today is on building the 'evidence base'. Almost every doctor is involved in some way from local audit through to conducting large multi-centre clinical trials. As you know, it's become a practically mandatory part of clinical training.

    While I don't know what the doctors that you 'personally know' do, I can tell you that all of the doctors that I personally know, and that's a few, have been involved in research at some level.
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    (Original post by kingstriker)
    Spoken with true ignorance, an attribute which hardly any doctors possess
    You'd be surprised...
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    (Original post by TomInce6666)
    Doctors get paid 100k after doing 15 years of training.

    Do you guys want to do 15 years before you can settle down with a house, a family?

    Working hours and being on call ruin lots of family life. A civil engineer can enjoy overseeing a project in the city and go home to his wife at 5pm. Often doctors dont.
    EXACTLY. They get paid a fair amount for the amount of time they put in! My dad's live is literally: Wake up, work, eat, sleep. I think for the amount of stress a doctor undergoes, they deserve every penny they get. :rolleyes: I suggest for all those people who think doctors get paid too much...next time you have a disease...don't go to the hospital.
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    (Original post by student777)
    ?? Have you actually talked to any doctors, or medical students, or anyone interested in a career in medicine? :facepalm2:

    If they really wanted the money, they would go into banking. More money, more quickly.
    true but only if you manage to fight off at least 10 other people for a place at a top uni, get a 2.1 or a 1st class degree and then somehow convince the employer that they should give you the job over hundreds of other applicants. :rolleyes:
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    I'm not sure. On the one hand I think a lot of doctors do deserve it - it's often a higly stressful and demanding job. You have to work hard to get there, and once you do the hours are long and you see difficult things every day. So maybe it's fair enough for some doctors. But GPs? I don't know. I guess it depends on what they're doing.

    The downside to being paid so much is that it encourages people who just want money and prestige to apply for medicine. It's one thing to be smart, quite another to have the right temperment. Offhand I can think of a few people who are just after the money.
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    (Original post by TomInce6666)
    Doctors get paid 100k after doing 15 years of training.

    Do you guys want to do 15 years before you can settle down with a house, a family?

    Working hours and being on call ruin lots of family life. A civil engineer can enjoy overseeing a project in the city and go home to his wife at 5pm. Often doctors dont.
    You're making it sound like doctors don't get paid during their 15 years of training. In reality, they would have an annual salary of at least 22k after their undergraduate studies. This figure would almost certainly be raised in the years ahead. By the time they reach the 15th year of their training, providing we are talking about a responsible individual who doesn't gamble away their savings, this person would be well into paying off their mortage for their first home if not completing it.
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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    By the time they reach the 15th year of their training, providing we are talking about a responsible individual who doesn't gamble away their savings, this person would be well into paying off their mortage for their first home if not completing it.
    How would they be paying off their mortgage, have you not seen how expensive it is to move house every year or two?
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    (Original post by Angela_Beth)
    I'm not sure. On the one hand I think doctors earn a little much: but at the same time it's often a higly stressful and demanding job. You have to work hard to get there, and once you do the hours are long and you see difficult things every day. So maybe it's fair enough for some doctors. But GPs? I don't know.

    I am sure that nurses should be paid more.
    What wages should nurses get? They aren't that badly paid.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    How would they be paying off their mortgage, have you not seen how expensive it is to move house every year or two?
    I'm not saying they would have definetly finished paying off their mortage by the 15th year. However, I would certainly be expecting anyone who's earning upwards from 22k to have at least paid off a hefty chunk of their mortage by their 10th or 9th year of full time employment (starting from foundation year 1 which is right after the undergraduate part of the training), considering as well that their annual salary would rise during this period.
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    I don't think Doctor's salaries are unreasonable at all, considering that a medical degree involves considerably more work than other degrees, the fact that they work on call and do very anti social hours, and the fact the GMC are now insisting every doctor is examined every 5 years on their fitness to practice which if they fail, they are out of a job and toally screwed!

    Plus they actually do something meaningful and save lives. Surgeons have incredible technical skill too.

    In the big picture, £100k a year is not that much compared to footballers who can "earn" that in a week for doing nothing at all.

    Considering the job they do, and the sheer amount of work they do to get where they are, I hardly see it as unreasonable that they are rewarded.
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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    I'm not saying they would have definetly finished paying off their mortage by the 15th year. However, I would certainly be expecting anyone who's earning upwards from 22k to have at least paid off a hefty chunk of their mortage by their 10th or 9th year of full time employment (starting from foundation year 1 which is right after the undergraduate part of the training), considering as well that their annual salary would rise during this period.
    You didn't understand, until you become a consultant Doctors move around the country depending on where the jobs are available. Hence people are loathed to buy a house in Exeter when a job may become available in Manchester.
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    (Original post by the666thmessiah)
    I agree. Doctors are like footballers; they shouldnt get as much as they do.
    Meh, it's your opinion, can't really argue against that.

    Officers in the military make life and death deicisions of at least 20 men per decision every day, but get a quarter of what most doctors get; plus im sure its harder to be an officer in the military than it is to be a doctor (you have to be smart AND fit AND alot more).
    Doctors are usually in charge of more than 20 patients. One FY1 doctor I know was responsible for 81 patients in a single day. Although the life/death situations that doctors are faced with are hardly ever like those on Holby City/Casualty, a single mistake by a doctor can result in the death of a patient or worse.

    Biomedical scientists and Chemists are the ones who discover and produce the medicines that Doctors ride the white horse on, so they effectively save alot more people than a doctor does in his lifetime.
    You make it sound as though every scientist in the world has discovered at least one thing which has led to millions of lives being saved. This is hardly the case, most of the 'discoveries' made by scientists are usually baby steps and rarely result in any massive changes to the healthcare system.

    Firemen risk their lives to save peoples lives, AND have to make life or death decisions; and their life is far more stressful.
    Unless if you have been a doctor and a fireman at some point, I highly doubt you are at liberty to say which is more stressful.

    As for scientists in further training, yes, I agree.. they also typically, all be it, indirectly, save more people than a doctor does.
    So yes, Doctors shouldnt get paid as much as they should... Hell the high pay is the reason 99% of doctors are doing what they are doing; few do it because they like the subject/apparent challenge/want to care for others.
    Well you clearly have no idea what medicine involves, so it would be best to stop pretending as though you can read the minds of every medical applicant/medic
    A very naive and ill-informed post at best :rolleyes:
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    My GP drives a brand-spanking new BMW M5.

    My communications engineering degree left me unemployed for 5 years.
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    (Original post by Organ)
    You didn't understand, until you become a consultant Doctors move around the country depending on where the jobs are available. Hence people are loathed to buy a house in Exeter when a job may become available in Manchester.

    Well my post was orginally intended to 'renal' who only suggested house prices as the problem for doctors 'settling down' with a home.

    I admit that I didn't know that doctors would be moved around the country, mainly because I have never heard of this in my experiences with the NHS and from talking to medicine applicants. Frankly, I find this a bit strange because surely the aim of this 'training' period is to get doctors upto the required standard, so isn't it disruptive to the learning process?

    So how long would each 'job' last ?
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    (Original post by E_jackie_late)
    My GP drives a brand-spanking new BMW M5.

    My communications engineering degree left me unemployed for 5 years.
    How old is he/she and what area are you in?

    Sorry about the unemployment by the way
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    Doctors surely do NOT get paid that amount. About under £50,000 per annum.
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    (Original post by NoFunnyBusiness)
    I suggest for all those people who think doctors get paid too much...next time you have a disease...don't go to the hospital.
    I suggest for all those people who think bankers get paid too much...next time you need financial services...don't go to the bank.
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    (Original post by 1992LP)
    I don't think Doctor's salaries are unreasonable at all, considering that a medical degree involves considerably more work than other degrees, the fact that they work on call and do very anti social hours, and the fact the GMC are now insisting every doctor is examined every 5 years on their fitness to practice which if they fail, they are out of a job and toally screwed!
    After a post doc a scientist has put similar effort in.

    Plus they actually do something meaningful and save lives. Surgeons have incredible technical skill too.
    So the guy who made the meaningless transistor and changed civilization as we know it or the guy who gave us meaningless electricity or small things like making our lives easier through better mobiles with more functionality are doing meaningless work. Give me a Break.

    In the big picture, £100k a year is not that much compared to footballers who can "earn" that in a week for doing nothing at all.
    No one except Gary Neville thinks that footballers are worth it. We are talking about scientists here.

    Considering the job they do, and the sheer amount of work they do to get where they are, I hardly see it as unreasonable that they are rewarded.
    Again other jobs like designing bridges or circuits require continuous inovative thinking and hard work for which extra hours are not even paid. Its the BMA's excellent negotiation skills after 2003/2004 that has made Doctor's contracts so lucarative.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    As you're well aware, most of the research conducted in medicine today is on building the 'evidence base'. Almost every doctor is involved in some way from local audit through to conducting large multi-centre clinical trials. As you know, it's become a practically mandatory part of clinical training.

    While I don't know what the doctors that you 'personally know' do, I can tell you that all of the doctors that I personally know, and that's a few, have been involved in research at some level.
    The clinical trials and various drugs which Doctors test , are those created by doctors or medical scientist. From what doctors told me it seemed they observed and recorded the effects of the drug but the drugs and equipment themseleves are designed by scientists after input from the doctors. It is a mutual relationship with one party getting all the monetary reward.
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    (Original post by kim.gordon)
    We should pay politicians more, they're the ones giving the teachers the pay rise.
    Or we should pay the unemployed more. They scare people away into becoming politicians who give teachers a pay rise who teach doctors.
 
 
 
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