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    Ooh...big mistake from the teacher to share it without your permission. At best, naivety, at worst, a potential breach of the Data Protection Act 1998.

    This is because:
    A) It contains personal information - potentially sensitive personal information;
    B) The teacher did not get written agreement from you to share it.

    If you wanted to escalate it, you may want to ask your teacher to set out (in writing) how the disclosure of a sensitive & confidential document did not breach the above-mentioned Act.
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    Tell your teacher piss off - you did it on your own, she's there to help you, not you to help her. Lazy cow.
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    (Original post by Reformed2010)
    Right and my passport will be seen by more than a dozen of people in my life time. As will my driving licence, Birth certificate, utility bill and debit card. Difference is they are seen by people who need to see them, nothing more and nothing less. They still remain private documents, as they are only seen by those immediately concerned. You can have something private but still have millions of people use it, look at private property. I can have a house and allow a member of public to rent it, it is still my private property. Private is defined by self-ownership and some ones personal statement is in private hands.
    Big difference - I can't use your personal statement to steal your identity or money. I could with anything listed above, which is why they are treated confidentially.

    I did my PS early to hit the early UCAS deasline and I shared my personal statement around, and the college used it to help other students - its not about copying content, it's about getting an idea of the the of things to write about and how to present it. There were absolutely no issues with plagiarism or any of the other nonsense people on this thread are going on about.

    As long as the teacher is sensible, and allows people to read it and then takes it back, rather than distributing copies, there shouldn't be any issue.
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    It's personal in that it's a statement about you as a person. It is no means private at all - it will be read by at least 10 admissions staff, probably more.
    If it contains information that can identify a living person & is stored in a structured filing system, the Data Protection Act applies. Institutions storing such personal information are responsible for storing & processing such information in a manner that is compatible with the Data Protection Principles as set out in the Act.

    Those people of whichever institutions that view that personal information will need to have a reasonable justification for viewing or processimg that information e.g. For the purposes of assessimg/processing an application for university. Anyone who does not have a reasonable justification for viewing that information should not be viewing it.
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    (Original post by Reformed2010)
    Right and my passport will be seen by more than a dozen of people in my life time. As will my driving licence, Birth certificate, utility bill and debit card. Difference is they are seen by people who need to see them, nothing more and nothing less. They still remain private documents, as they are only seen by those immediately concerned. You can have something private but still have millions of people use it, look at private property. I can have a house and allow a member of public to rent it, it is still my private property. Private is defined by self-ownership and some ones personal statement is in private hands.
    This^^^

    The law underpins who can & cannot view personal information as per my earlier posts. The Information Commissioner takes a very dim view of any organisation that breaches information security laws.
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    I let other people read my personal statement, but since the best statements are tailored for your course, I was fine sharing it with my best friend (he was applying for the same course but I trust him implicitly) and other friends who were taking other courses.
    However she shouldn't share it with the class. It's for you to share with who you want, at your discretion, to help someone else with their style, not their content. If she does it without your permission punch her in the face, or report her.
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    Something I think a lot of people in this thread have overlooked-

    From the OP:
    and now wants my permission to share it with the class,
    Nothing has been handed out yet. Permission has merely been asked.
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    Noooooo
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    (Original post by Silent Man)
    Oh for heaven sakes. Unless you put something really embarrassing or something, why do you care. In fact I'd be quite smug that the teacher would want to use mine to show how a PS should be.

    If you've already put it on UCAS, the others can't copy. If they did, they will get in trouble, not you.

    EDIT- Wait, have you already finished your UCAS? If not, then I understand. Because someone could copy it and then finish their application before you.
    It's nothing to do with whether anything is completely embarrassing or not. If the OP has not given consent it should not have been shared. End of.

    The likelihood that the OP can be identified by the information in the statement alone (as well as method of processing & storing) means tjat the Data Protection Act would apply.

    In the Whitehall jungle, any application form or appraisal has the heading: "Restricted when completed" on them. The same should apply with personal statements for university. The headmaster or responsible officer of the institution that allows such potential breaches of information rights legislation is treading on very thin ice given the powers that the Information Commissioner has. (http://www.ico.gov.uk)
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    If it contains information that can identify a living person & is stored in a structured filing system, the Data Protection Act applies. Institutions storing such personal information are responsible for storing & processing such information in a manner that is compatible with the Data Protection Principles as set out in the Act.

    Those people of whichever institutions that view that personal information will need to have a reasonable justification for viewing or processimg that information e.g. For the purposes of assessimg/processing an application for university. Anyone who does not have a reasonable justification for viewing that information should not be viewing it.
    Yeah, but no-one has viewed it, and only will view it with the OP's permission. And if the OP gives permission then DPA doesn't apply.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    It's nothing to do with whether anything is completely embarrassing or not. If the OP has not given consent it should not have been shared. End of.

    The likelihood that the OP can be identified by the information in the statement alone (as well as method of processing & storing) means tjat the Data Protection Act would apply.

    In the Whitehall jungle, any application form or appraisal has the heading: "Restricted when completed" on them. The same should apply with personal statements for university. The headmaster or responsible officer of the institution that allows such potential breaches of information rights legislation is treading on very thin ice given the powers that the Information Commissioner has. (http://www.ico.gov.uk)
    I have been registered with the ICO for a project I have been working on for a number of years. Despite their alleged powers, they seriously cannot find their ass with a map.
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    (Original post by Stefan1991)
    Simply, just say no. It's your intellectual property. If people use it in their personal statements, if you find out you can sue them.
    It's more likely to be a data protection issue than an intellectual property on, though I take where the sentiment comes from.
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    Yeah, but no-one has viewed it, and only will view it with the OP's permission. And if the OP gives permission then DPA doesn't apply.
    Correct - and that's what the OP has to consider.
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    I have been registered with the ICO for a project I have been working on for a number of years. Despite their alleged powers, they seriously cannot find their ass with a map.
    As an aside, they've been under-resourced for years & tend to focus on the bigger fish - big companies, government departments & large institutions.

    However, the generic point remains: teachers should not be sharing personal statements if you have not given your consent. In the grand scheme of things, such applications should be kept confidential. That's a spook's take.
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    I would honestly say no. It might be a kind thing and all but if they copy you, it might end up being you getting rejected from universities.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    It's more likely to be a data protection issue than an intellectual property on, though I take where the sentiment comes from.
    I thought data protection had more to do with the personal details of the OP, the personal statement seems more like a creative work owned by the OP and copyrighted.
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    (Original post by Reformed2010)
    What does personal mean to you? To me and the majority of others, it kind of entails a sense of privacy and self-ownership. It is called a personal statement, not a impersonal statement for a reason. A teacher has a no authority to show a pupil's statement to another pupil.

    Tell the teacher to stop, if not report him or her.
    The meaning of "personal" is different from that of "personal statement". It does not necessarily entails a sense of privacy as for 1 big fat reason - you are meant to advertise yourself through a PS to a university or a job, considering he fills in relevant information thats surely directed to a subject matter that the OP apples rather than of high personal value that requires privacy.
    The teacher did not use authority yet, especially with the fact that she asked permission and not produce it flatly without asking the OP.
    Just 'cause it's called blackboard doesnt mean its black. stupid.
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    (Original post by Jordan656)
    Big difference - I can't use your personal statement to steal your identity or money. I could with anything listed above, which is why they are treated confidentially.

    I did my PS early to hit the early UCAS deasline and I shared my personal statement around, and the college used it to help other students - its not about copying content, it's about getting an idea of the the of things to write about and how to present it. There were absolutely no issues with plagiarism or any of the other nonsense people on this thread are going on about.

    As long as the teacher is sensible, and allows people to read it and then takes it back, rather than distributing copies, there shouldn't be any issue.
    1. The fact that you can't steal my identity does not stop the personal statement from being a private document. Something can be private and not treated confidentially, like private land.

    2. Yes I am aware what I listed are extremes. However if a teacher took my diary, is that both not private and a personal document? there are no dangers of stealing my identity. So simply being able to steal an identity is not the soul factor in judging the 'morality' of publicising a personal document.

    3. Its not about copying the content? there is absolutely no risk of plagiarism? and you can speak for everyone I take it? I knew plenty of people who did in my college. I am known to be pretty idealistic, but you just stated no student in Britain would or have plagiarise a personal document, come on now...

    4. It is an issue.

    At the end of the day, its all about respect and professionalism. Something a teacher is suppose to embody. You may think what the teacher has done is harmless, and on the grand scales of things it is!. My teachers always asked my permission before they copied and handed out my essays to the class. I never once told them they should ask me before. But guess what? its called something...

    R E S P E C T. Find out what it means to me!
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    Say no.

    You'll never see most/any of them again anyway.

    Do tell them to have fun at london met on results day though when you ship off to oxbridge/the russell group.
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    Is your teacher dizzy blud?
 
 
 
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