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Can I still be sociable even though i'm not living at campus? watch

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    #1

    I'm looking to make friends and go out my comfort zone to be sociable and experience Uni as much as I can, but I've got a dilemma.

    I'm living at home, Uni is around 1hr 30m to get there so I need to take that into consideration when I head home.
    Will I be at a disadvantage to those who live on campus and get to know each other as they're with other peers all the time and I and can't react to events e.g. 'fancy a drink' when i'm already home or on the way home which gives me -1 points for each 'friend-building' event I turn down, hopefully you get what I mean.

    This is what i'm quite worried about that It'll become a generic go to lectures come home sit on PC and that's that.

    Any advice/anyone been in this situation?
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    Not going to lie, it will be harder, yes, than someone who lives in halls. But, you don't have to miss out on everything. If you think the latest a lecture will ever finish is 6 which gives you two and half hours of socialising to be home at a decent time. Plus, if you make good friends on your course who live on campus, there'll always be somewhere for you to crash if you ever wanted to stay a night.
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    i feel the same, im finding it hard to make friends as im living at home. people seem to know each other from what iv seen so far. ive tried adding people on facebook but they seem to be less interested in being friends a they already have freidns from halls. im starting to worry
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    Why couldn't you live in halls? The travel fees alone will be costly.
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    It will be harder, yes, but that shouldn't stop you from socialising with people on your course.

    You'll be able to join societies (very good idea for meeting people with similar interests).

    The main people you won't be able to socialise with are obviously those that you would live with in halls if you were to live in halls, but it's not the end of the world.

    If you want to badly enough then you'll find ways around the problems

    Have you started uni yet out of interest?
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    No starting monday
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    Don't worry about it too much.

    You'll be fine
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    What's the point in Uni if you're not going to be independent.
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    (Original post by rebecca_george)
    What's the point in Uni if you're not going to be independent.
    Don't understand that comment.

    It's more financially secure & substantially less to live at home.
    Usually it's 1 hr journey and next year my course will be even closer as it's in central london.
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    I live at home in Sheffield and study in Huddersfield. I shan't lie and say that going out on the spur of the moment is easy - but friends tend to offer their sofas if it looks like it's getting late, and there's plenty of time to socialise during the day. Unless you like going out every night (For me once a week is a busy social life) then you should be fine.
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    I thought my college 30 mins away was a pain to get to everyday!!
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    (Original post by rebecca_george)
    What's the point in Uni if you're not going to be independent.
    Um to get a degree?!
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    I think initially it will be harder but in years 2+ most poeple tend to live out anyway
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    I had the same issue in first year. Now come second year I've realised the way around it is to get involved with societies. I got involving with one sport and have made quite a few friends. As for going out you don't have to go out every single night and if you make the effort even just to stick around for about an hour and 1/2 at the pub with them every week you'll become friendly pretty soon. Remember not to get too bogged down with loaaaads of societies, I'd say one sport/something physical and one other society (something that might tie in with your course or an action group/volunteering or something) would be good for people living at home. I also stress not to chicken out at the first meeting because you didn't like what was going on. Stick it out, at least try to attend every session for a month and max 1 social for like 1 1/2 a week to get to know people properly. If after the first month you feel overwhelmed, you could cut the number of your attendances down according to the demand of your course, speak to the main members and ask if e.g. you could attend one training session instead of say twice a week if this is what you need at the time, because hopefully you will have by then secured some good friendships and it won't be so necessary to bust a gut keeping up with the people living in halls. It is true that it would be good to have a good friend who lives in a student house or halls who if you decided to stay out later would let you crash at theres and not have to risk travelling home if its pretty late. If you don't have one of these like I say just once a week at pub for an hour and a half will get you friendly with people.
    Good luck .
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    It's going to be slightly more difficult, yes. But, there are ways around it:

    You can socialise during the day, rather than in the night. If you make friends in lectures, and it seems that every Wednesday you finish at 12, get your new friends to go for food somewhere. Not all socialising at Uni needs to occur in the hours of darkness.

    If you make some really good friends, you can always ask to crash at their place. Whenever friends from home would come to Cardiff, we'd always put them up on our floor. Had I met people living at home rather than in halls or a student house, I'd probably have offered them the couch for the night.

    You also don't need to go out on every occasion. Once you explain your situation to people, I'm sure they'll be 'understanding' of the fact that you can't make every single night out.


    I currently live at near the end of the bus line in Pavia. It's an hour's walk into town, and 15minutes by bus. Buses stop at 9pm. Considering this part of town is practically the 'green belt', if nobody from this University residence (or the one next to it) is going out, I turn down plans. I don't mind walking back alone at 2am, but it's really not something I'd do every night. People understand when we leave early, or when we don't turn up, because to them it's a long way to come just for a few drinks. Essentially, it should be the same for you - people should think "Oh, an hour and a half; that's a long way. Yeah, if you have to go, don't worry about it"

    Good luck with it though. Just make the occasional attempt, and it should be fine
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    Another thing is when you know people better, maybe once or twice you could crash at theirs
 
 
 
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