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Anyone ever noticed that anytime you read about/see someone with grade AAA, its science subjects? What does this tell us about science subjects? Watch

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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    Just out of interest, how did you fare in Arts subjects in school?
    My degree is classified as a 'Master of Arts'. :wink2:
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    No, it's because all the losers study those courses who do nothing but study.
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    (Original post by fist of the south star)
    I'm doing Philosophy, English Literature and Maths and I'm predicted AAA plus an A in further maths AS.
    If possible I would've taken classics and latin as well, confident I could've gotten A predictions in them as well.
    Year 13 btw
    Thanks for that, extremely pertinent and non-egotistic, very valuable knowledge.
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    a third of candidates got an ''a star'' in FM?

    If that was true for every subject, people would be saying a levels are too easy, and rightfully so.

    Obviously only the best mathematicians take FM, but even still-does it not make anyone else question the exam system when in a course of study 33.3% of candidates get A* (whether it be maths or whatever, that seems too high- i thought the system was set up such that A* was a distinct thing for unis to use to identify the very 'top candidates'- how can they do this when they see FM on your CV and see A* - might they think 'well a third of people get a* in it anyway' what i mean is, it takes away the uniqueness and impressiveness of it if a third get a*- anyone agree??)
    It's true for FM. FM is difficult but people taking it tend to be maths whizzes. Unless they introduce A**, there's nothing they can do. There's less variance in FM because people who are C-standard give or take a grade don't tend to sit the exams.

    edit: apart from me :P


    (Original post by Organ)
    Both Biology and Chemistry A-level require long essay writing in the exam.
    Do they? Not in my experience they don't:p: Do you mean coursework?
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    Maybe it's only people doing science subjects that feel the need to project their results to people who don't care?
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    (Original post by Architecture-er)
    No - because FM is exactly that, Further Maths. To get onto the course you need to have displayed exemplary skill in Maths, it's like saying X% of students in the top 5 universities of the country get firsts, ergo firsts aren't good.
    I know what you mean ie only the best mathematicians do FM.

    But even still i think the system is a bad system heres why:

    Imagine you are an admissions staff member/employer and you are looking for a small number of people who are the very very very top mathematicians of all a level students. you would go for all those who got A* in fm, wouldnt you?

    But that is still a large number of people(because of the fact a third of people doing it get A*), and i do know that its a more uncommon a-level ie only a minority of top maths people do it.

    (In my opinion, (just my opinion, im not sure if anyone would share it) a levels should be set up such that no more than a third get grade A and A* should be for the top 5-10% in any subject.)

    Even if it is FM, if they adjusted its difficulty/or did whatever to make it such that 5-10% get A* then it would be better for the selection problem i described above.

    I do take on board what you mean:

    I said a third getting A* took away the uniqueness/specialness of the A* grade.
    You said it didnt as only top math people do fm.

    I know, but if 5-10% got A*, a third got A or higher, it would be a better system in my opinion.
    I should add that if my system was in place, a levels wouldnt be equal in ucas points/equal in regard ie a C in fm would get more points than say a B in another science.

    Maybe i written a load of rubbish, but its just an opinion, do you see what i mean at all??
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    Well considering the primary determinants of ones grade is the ability to regurgitate knowledge dictated by the exam board with the exam technique specified and not dissent from the framework they deem necessary, it seems probable 'science' subjects are generally easier to prepare for. Exam technique is barely necessary in sciences, objective fact is all that's needed for the grades for the vast majority of questions, irrespective of structure or style of prose.

    As for the difficulty of the subject content itself, i think it's largely dependent on the individual.
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    Well, I took English lit AS. I suppose you cannot get more Artsy than that. Personally, I think that English Lit AS is quite a bull-shize subject. Analysing texts felt like drawing blood from stones. You have to write about so much bull-shize about what an author might have possibly intended to convey through whatever literary technique. seemed so artificial.

    Some people on the course would write paragraphs cloaked in eloquent english that actually amounted to zilch. When reading a friends essay I asked him what particular sentences meant and he would often say he didn't know, but they sounded nice. He got an A* at the end of A2.

    Students of English are allowed to be so vague and waffly and aren't penalised. The essays students write are often always boring as hell.

    Because so many students are allowed to bull-shize so excessively in arts exams, they do it. It seems to me that the more you bull-shize in these exams the more points you score and the higher your grade. Arts subjects require less intelligence than science ones, just an ability to write quickly and also some verbal diarrhoea.
    Exam mark schemes can be very prescriptive, stifling creativity. So As in arts subjects correspond less to natural intelligence and more to fulfilling the criteria of the mark scheme and an ability to talk endlessly (girls can talk endlessly-hence why they do better). last point was a joke btw-don't tar and feather me.

    Though science subjects, on the other hand, require less raw problem solving ability than they used to, at least they are not point blank about bull-shize.

    I got A* in maths, further maths, physics. An A in econ-a complete bull-shize subject at A-level, and an a in as English.


    my post is so colourful it could get an A* in art a-level. Modern art at its finest.
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    i did maths, politics and economics, two of which are essay subjects and got A*A*A*. I know people that did no science subjects and got A*A*AA and other equivalents, really not a very true statement
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    [QUOTE=methusaleh][COLOR="Navy"]

    Students of English are allowed to be so vague and waffly and aren't penalised. The essays students write are often always boring as hell.

    I beg to differ I had whole pages of English and History Highlighted for waffle less marks were awarded for the overall content and I often had to redo essays 3 times if considered too waffly. Emphasis was always placed on getting to a point using Literary evidence
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    (Original post by samisnothere)
    tells us that the people taking science are, most of the time, devoted and hard working
    Deffinatly.
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    What a lot of people seem to be forgetting is that exam success is largely down to knowing what the examiners want, and good results aren't always indictive of intelligence.
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    (Original post by microfatcat)
    Do they? Not in my experience they don't:p: Do you mean coursework?
    No, Biology Unit 5 has a big essay at the end, as does Salters Chemistry.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    This has been debated before.

    Maby because all the sciences have a certain logic behind them, so if you excell at one you are likely to at the others.

    EG: There are 4 sciences including Maths, and 5 including Further. But are there 5 essay subjects? Not really, not with the same underlying connection.

    Im not saying the sciences are the hardest A levels, but I think its hard for anyone to judge unless they have done both sets.
    History, English Lit, Religious Studies, Classic Civ., and Modern Foreign Language or Drama & Theatre Studies
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    That's nice. I have three sciences and three arts subjects at A- or AS-level, and I disagree with your opinion... so tell me, what makes your experience universally valid? You happen to have found one subject easier than another; that doesn't mean that said relative 'ease' of subjects is definitive.
    I never said it was universally valid, it's a subjective opinion.

    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    I was unaware of this. However, I assume they are questions that involve mainly including facts, rather than asking your opinion on the importance of the appendix (for example) in humans?
    Yes, compared to a subject like history. Although Biology requires linking between different units and so on.
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    English Lit AS is quite a bull-shize subject. Analysing texts felt like drawing blood from stones. You have to write about so much bull-shize about what an author might have possibly intended to convey through whatever literary technique. seemed so artificial.
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    cos we scientists r kool ! lol nah i guess it's down to the genuine interest and dedication to the subject....and dat we r kool!
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    (Original post by wilson_smith)
    Well considering the primary determinants of ones grade is the ability to regurgitate knowledge dictated by the exam board with the exam technique specified and not dissent from the framework they deem necessary, it seems probable 'science' subjects are generally easier to prepare for. Exam technique is barely necessary in sciences, objective fact is all that's needed for the grades for the vast majority of questions, irrespective of structure or style of prose.

    As for the difficulty of the subject content itself, i think it's largely dependent on the individual.
    I agree.
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    I know what you mean ie only the best mathematicians do FM.

    But even still i think the system is a bad system heres why:

    Imagine you are an admissions staff member/employer and you are looking for a small number of people who are the very very very top mathematicians of all a level students. you would go for all those who got A* in fm, wouldnt you?

    But that is still a large number of people(because of the fact a third of people doing it get A*), and i do know that its a more uncommon a-level ie only a minority of top maths people do it.

    (In my opinion, (just my opinion, im not sure if anyone would share it) a levels should be set up such that no more than a third get grade A and A* should be for the top 5-10% in any subject.)

    Even if it is FM, if they adjusted its difficulty/or did whatever to make it such that 5-10% get A* then it would be better for the selection problem i described above.

    I do take on board what you mean:

    I said a third getting A* took away the uniqueness/specialness of the A* grade.
    You said it didnt as only top math people do fm.

    I know, but if 5-10% got A*, a third got A or higher, it would be a better system in my opinion.
    I should add that if my system was in place, a levels wouldnt be equal in ucas points/equal in regard ie a C in fm would get more points than say a B in another science.

    Maybe i written a load of rubbish, but its just an opinion, do you see what i mean at all??
    I do, but if you look at it from the perspective of a FM student - the grades they attain testify to their intelligence, not how well they do compared to other people in that year (some who may have had resits). What you're talking about is addressed to some extent with UMS marks, where grade boundaries are set so that approximately the same percentage of people each year (nationally) get the top grades. However to totally dictate the grades based on your ranking amongst your peers may falsely represent your competence, either for better or worse, so it can't happen.
    When people look at FM %'s I imagine they look at them in the context of the Maths %'s - and if the grades of the normal Maths are well-tuned then they can be assured that the FM students have been well-vetted and are all very good Mathematicians.
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    This has been debated before.

    Maby because all the sciences have a certain logic behind them, so if you excell at one you are likely to at the others.

    EG: There are 4 sciences including Maths, and 5 including Further. But are there 5 essay subjects? Not really, not with the same underlying connection.

    Im not saying the sciences are the hardest A levels, but I think its hard for anyone to judge unless they have done both sets.
    I did two sciences and history and I have to say history was by far the easiest out of them! I put bare minimum effort into it and spent most of my revision time studying the sciences.
 
 
 
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