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Anyone ever noticed that anytime you read about/see someone with grade AAA, its science subjects? What does this tell us about science subjects? watch

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    :lolwut: I don't know how anybody could insinuate that sciences or mathematic subjects are easy.

    And i'm not even doing them.
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    That they like to work.
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    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    So, while I worked my arse off writing essays on Neville Chamberlain, the House of Lords, post-Franco Spain, and dystopian fiction...students of science can just learn that M=DV and know that it will never change.
    A-Level sciences really aren't a matter of memorising formulae though. Many are actually given to you - at A-Level it's often not very apparent which formula (or formulae) you need to use, or even what data you need to calculate in order to answer the question. The questions are intentionally designed to test application of knowledge (and whether you actually understand the concepts) rather than memory

    Memorising works for GCSE, but good luck with that strategy at A-Level
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    Hi all

    Anytime i ever read about or meet someone with AAA or higher in A-levels, its always sciences and maths subjects.
    Is this just my experience, or have other people here found the same? Ie anytime you hear about someone getting AAA or more its always sciences

    If this isnt just my experience in life, what does this tell us about sciences and maths at a-level(or maybe not confined to a-level)??

    Could it be that sciences and maths are easier to do well in than arts subjects, therefore its always science/math people getting AAA or more????

    Im interested to hear what people have to say

    (note:when i read the newspapers around results time or read peoples results in the TSR sig for example, AAA people are nearly always science and maths, rarely Eng/languages/arts people- has anyone else noticed this??)


    Note:i study sciencey a levels myself

    Edit: people are starting to compare science with things like media /drama
    Talk about media/drama/'soft subjects' etc if you want, but I was meaning that i never hear of people as many getting AAA in traditional arts subjects like english/languages/history compared to sciences

    :facepalm:

    OR that hard working and more intelligent people do the maths and science subjects. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    I have heard that biology is the dodgy one out of all the sciences :p:
    Believe me, it really is. Soooooo wish i'd done further maths instead.
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    I thought it would be obvious that people keen on sciences are hardworking; they are not 'fun' subjects unless you are very dedicated.
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    (Original post by rebecca_george)
    I thought it would be obvious that people keen on sciences are hardworking; they are not 'fun' subjects unless you are very dedicated.
    Sorry but Chemistry = fun
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    (Original post by brendan.)
    Well, i don't think it makes them any easier, they just tend to do them because they are good at them, and interested in them. They can hardly be considered as easy, as they wouldnt be considered by unis as strong A Levels otherwise. Arts is more of a, if you're good at it, you're good at it; and if not, you're not. And i think some people take arts subjects thinking that its easier to do, and then they don't put their all in, and do worse.
    But its not to say you can only be good at sciences or arts. I take Sciences, and then French. And admittedly I'm better at sciences, but I'd still say I'm pretty strong in French. And I'm pretty good at art too, I done really well in GCSE Art. :nod: Lmao, I was so proud.
    Aaand, remember sciences are more common, so you're bound to hear of people doing really well in them.
    I totally agree.
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    I got A*A*A in Biology, Economics and English Lit...I wouldnt say that was all science subjects... :rolleyes:
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    ...that clever people take them?
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    (Original post by bloomblaze)
    Hi all

    Anytime i ever read about or meet someone with AAA or higher in A-levels, its always sciences and maths subjects.
    Is this just my experience, or have other people here found the same? Ie anytime you hear about someone getting AAA or more its always sciences

    If this isnt just my experience in life, what does this tell us about sciences and maths at a-level(or maybe not confined to a-level)??

    Could it be that sciences and maths are easier to do well in than arts subjects, therefore its always science/math people getting AAA or more????

    Im interested to hear what people have to say

    (note:when i read the newspapers around results time or read peoples results in the TSR sig for example, AAA people are nearly always science and maths, rarely Eng/languages/arts people- has anyone else noticed this??)


    Note:i study sciencey a levels myself

    Edit: people are starting to compare science with things like media /drama
    Talk about media/drama/'soft subjects' etc if you want, but I was meaning that i never hear of people as many getting AAA in traditional arts subjects like english/languages/history compared to sciences
    You just named my subjects :grin:.

    Maybe it's because science and maths subjects tend to have definite answers, whereas getting As in things like English and History is dependent on you having good analytical and writing skills. Perhaps it's easier for a good student to succeed at sciences, whereas a good student could still fall down when doing arts subjects? It doesn't necessarily mean that one is easier than the other; they just require different skills and approaches.
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    i haven't noticed this
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    People who study three science subjects are a biased population. They are more likely to be good at science, and that is why they chose them. If you are less intelligent, want to do some A levels, but are not particularly good at anything, then you will choose to do more arts based subjects. These are the people who get lower grades in them.
    If you want to compare how difficult the science subjects are, compared to other subjects, then you would have to pick a mixed population of people who were studying both arts and science subjects, and compare the difference in grades that they achieved in the respective subjects. If you did this, then you would probably find that they didn't do any better in the science subjects, and I think they would actually do slightly worse, as there is less room for blagging.
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    I study English and got AAA. Admittedly one was Media, but the other two were Geography and English Language. Hardly considered soft subjects.

    So no, I've never really noticed people with higher A levels on do Maths & Sciences - the people on my course are similar to me.
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    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    Well, at the risk of sounding like a ****, I actually feel pretty good knowing that I managed AAAA with four subjects from Humanities (which the OP thinks are difficult, based on the relative ease of sciences?), and which didn't include a single 'joke' subject -- unless you class Gov&Pol as a joke?

    Seriously - the only reason you can see higher grades more frequently in sciences isn't down to the relative ease of them, but due to the fact that sciences are formula based. So, while I worked my arse off writing essays on Neville Chamberlain, the House of Lords, post-Franco Spain, and dystopian fiction...students of science can just learn that M=DV and know that it will never change.

    I will admit, it is a lot harder to learn formula after formula and fact-upon-fact for Chemistry, Biology, Physics and Maths; maybe more so than writing an opinion-based essay. However, to answer the original question in the title:

    It tells us that sciences are easier to revise for, but not necessarily easier in terms of content and the amount of knowledge needed. Humanities are harder to revise for, but require little to no in-depth knowledge of the subject so any idiot can attempt (and fail) to do them well.
    This. And I am a science student.

    Although I have a great respect for people who study the Humanities, purely as Science is based on logic, and 'yes' or 'no' questions, while Humanities is more about how you can express your own opinions in a way that an examiner would like.
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    I think it depends on what sort of person you are and what are your strengths and weaknesses..

    Here are my predicted grades..
    eng lit: A
    physics: C
    chemistry: D

    And i studied harder for the science subjects...:P
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    (Original post by Organ)
    Chemistry is miles harder than Geography and History. They are a joke in comparison.
    Maybe you just suck at Chemistry.
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    (Original post by Planar)
    Maybe you just suck at Chemistry.
    Oh, I don't doubt
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    (Original post by Jordan H)
    This. And I am a science student.

    Although I have a great respect for people who study the Humanities, purely as

    Science is based on logic, and 'yes' or 'no' questions,

    while Humanities is more about how you can express your own opinions in a way that an examiner would like.
    Wrong. And wrong again.
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    If you knew the reliability of how exams are marked, you wouldn't even bother with arts A levels.

    A test was carried out in English Literature two years ago. A candidate produced two identical exam papers, by completing one then copying the other. One copy was marked by examiner A, the other by examinier B.

    Examiner A awarded an A.

    Examiner B, awarded a C.

    Examiner A was English, Examiner B was from India. Examiner A was able to understand the candidates interpretation of satire, whereas examiner B couldn't. Hence the A grade.

    English exams are so subjective. They should be marked internally by teachers who understand the candidates writing style and interpretation.
 
 
 
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