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UK to Have the Worlds Most Expensive Degrees Watch

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    When the Browne review is announced in a few weeks, it is expected to recommend that the cap on student tuition be lifted. A study by the UCU has found that UK already has the 4th most expensive public university degrees of any developed country.

    A fee rise would make our public degrees the most expensive in the world.

    Link to original OCED research if anyone thinks the UCU has been selective.

    EDIT: Yes, this research does exclude american private universities. If the private sector were included, then the fees would be considerably higher in the US. However, the two are not comparable since private unis are not directly taxpayer subsidized, whereas all bar one of our universities are. Therefore, the UK will have the highest tax subsidized degrees in the world.

    It is also worth pointing out that private does not automagically mean better. UC Berkley, UCLA, University of Michigan, University of Texas, University of Wisconsin Madison and the college of William and Mary are all public. Wheras the University of Pheonix, Liberty 'these fossils are only 5 thousand years old' University and life university are all private. Good universities can be found in either category.
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    (Original post by spidergareth)
    When the Browne review is announced in a few weeks, it is expected to recommend that the cap on student tuition be lifted. A study by the UCU has found that UK already has the 4th most expensive public university degrees of any developed country.

    A fee rise would make our public degrees the most expensive in the world.

    Link to original OCED research if anyone thinks the UCU has been selective.
    In America, I thought some colleges cost upwards of $50,000 USD pa. I can't believe a fee increase here would take them above that level?

    The UK has a fee cap which many countries does not. In America, the top unis charge huge fees and the other unis charge much lower fees. You can't really just take an average fee paid, because with our fee cap system you can get a fantastic education from a top uni for a reasonable price, whereas in other countries you 'get what you pay for'.

    e: I think tuition fees should be higher, I would happily pay upwards of £10,000 per year for my degree, but maybe some people studying 'micky mouse' degrees at micky mouse unis would reconsider. This would make the good degrees even more valuable.

    e: one problem with the data already is that it only looks at the public universities in, say, America. Most of the top unis are private, and charge higher fees. In the UK all the unis, even the very top ones, are public.
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    as long as the help available for fees rise in line with them....I see nothing wrong with higher fees.....

    I daresay it would stop mickey mouse degrees as most people will not get themselves in c. £40-50K debt for a degree in "women studies"
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    In all fairness, someone has to be most expensive.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    In America, I thought some colleges cost upwards of $50,000 USD pa. I can't believe a fee increase here would take them above that level?

    The UK has a fee cap which many countries does not. In America, the top unis charge huge fees and the other unis charge much lower fees. You can't really just take an average fee paid, because with our fee cap system you can get a fantastic education from a top uni for a reasonable price, whereas in other countries you 'get what you pay for'.

    e: I think tuition fees should be higher, I would happily pay upwards of £10,000 per year for my degree, but maybe some people studying 'micky mouse' degrees at micky mouse unis would reconsider. This would make the good degrees even more valuable.

    e: one problem with the data already is that it only looks at the public universities in, say, America. Most of the top unis are private, and charge higher fees. In the UK all the unis, even the very top ones, are public.
    You are right to raise this, and the private degrees are in another table at the bottom. I think public institutions in the US have a fee cap, I may be wrong though.
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    Total mistake, they're just going to force more science grads into finance. Such a mistake. Sometimes I think it's such a shame that such great minds are wasted on finance. But aside from the US our fees are actually pretty expensive if you look into it. Most EU nations have free or almost free university education. Same with abroad, just look at Australia, they pay around the same as us perhaps slightly less depending on exchange rates.
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    Firstly, thats misleading as many of the worlds most expensive unis are not publicly funded.

    Secondly, wow, British unis are usually ranked highly, so its no surprise that they are expensive.
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    (Original post by spidergareth)
    You are right to raise this, and the private degrees are in another table at the bottom. I think public institutions in the US have a fee cap, I may be wrong though.
    Well the comparison is pretty much pointless, really. Our fee cap has the effect of 'averaging out' all the fees from all the unis. In America, some of the unis (public) have a fee cap, but then there are lots of private ones who charge what they like. All the best unis are private.

    If our fees were, say £10k pa, people would still get excellent value for money by going to Oxbridge, ICL, etc, compared to what they would have to pay at Harvard and other top US private schools. It is the people who go to the micky mouse unis and do micky mouse degrees who would start to get bad value for money - but the question is, do we want to subsidise them forever? I don't.

    (Original post by Ewan)
    Total mistake, they're just going to force more science grads into finance. Such a mistake. Sometimes I think it's such a shame that such great minds are wasted on finance. But aside from the US our fees are actually pretty expensive if you look into it.
    I am going to be a science grad and I want to go in to finance - why is that a "waste"? If fees were a lot more, or even a lot less, I don't think it would sway my career path at all: I want to do what I find interesting.
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    It says England..
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    I don't think they'll raise it, at least I hope they don't.
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    I don't think it's that expensive compared to US schools. But hey I'm looking at it as an international applicant plus I'm rich :gangster:
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    (Original post by SophiaKeuning)
    It says England..
    urgh. I totally forgot about that.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    I am going to be a science grad and I want to go in to finance - why is that a "waste"? If fees were a lot more, or even a lot less, I don't think it would sway my career path at all: I want to do what I find interesting.
    Perhaps you're an exception to the rule but if they started paying people working in IBD 20k pa as oppose to almost 70k pa now for graduate positions you wouldn't get many people doing it. Suffice to say very few graduates go into finance because it's 'interesting'.

    Personally I really don't understand how they can justify a fee rise. I'd love to see a breakdown of their costs. The amount of face time you get at UCL is absolutely shocking.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    In America, I thought some colleges cost upwards of $50,000 USD pa. I can't believe a fee increase here would take them above that level?

    The UK has a fee cap which many countries does not. In America, the top unis charge huge fees and the other unis charge much lower fees. You can't really just take an average fee paid, because with our fee cap system you can get a fantastic education from a top uni for a reasonable price, whereas in other countries you 'get what you pay for'.

    e: I think tuition fees should be higher, I would happily pay upwards of £10,000 per year for my degree, but maybe some people studying 'micky mouse' degrees at micky mouse unis would reconsider. This would make the good degrees even more valuable.

    e: one problem with the data already is that it only looks at the public universities in, say, America. Most of the top unis are private, and charge higher fees. In the UK all the unis, even the very top ones, are public.
    :yep:

    And it's insanely expensive for a student to read in a better university out of their state (as in, in a different region of the USA) even at a public uni. But I admit a lot of scholarships are available as they have significant endowments.
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    I want to bash the face of everyone that says 'mickey mouse degree' in with a fire extinguisher.
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    Well the comparison is pretty much pointless, really. Our fee cap has the effect of 'averaging out' all the fees from all the unis. In America, some of the unis (public) have a fee cap, but then there are lots of private ones who charge what they like. All the best unis are private.

    If our fees were, say £10k pa, people would still get excellent value for money by going to Oxbridge, ICL, etc, compared to what they would have to pay at Harvard and other top US private schools. It is the people who go to the micky mouse unis and do micky mouse degrees who would start to get bad value for money - but the question is, do we want to subsidise them forever? I don't.
    UC berkley certainly is'nt. I know the difference between private and public results in huge difference in cost but 2/3 of american students study at publicly funded institutions. The comparison is still perfectly valid.

    Not all private unis are the 'good ones' that don't do the mickey mouse degrees. They are still around, and people still pay for them.
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    They were talking of raising the cap to somewhere around £7-10K. I have no problem with paying that money to go to a top institution, as long as it doesn't get prohibitively expensive and there are always government loans.
    I think the point at which people restricted as to what university they can go to by their financial background is simply wrong. As long as the government can loan me the money I need to complete my degree, I don't mind paying £50k back at the end.
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    With this increase in tuituon fees for English students, will Scottish students still get free university education paid for by English taxpayers? If so I might have to skip univesity and become a pyscopath.
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    (Original post by Ewan)
    Perhaps you're an exception to the rule but if they started paying people working in IBD 20k pa as oppose to almost 70k pa now for graduate positions you wouldn't get many people doing it. Suffice to say very few graduates go into finance because it's 'interesting'.

    Personally I really don't understand how they can justify a fee rise. I'd love to see a breakdown of their costs. The amount of face time you get at UCL is absolutely shocking.
    The salaries offered in IBD (and finance as a whole, and indeed any career) are a reflection of supply and demand for the skills and people needed in those roles. If they offered less salary, of course less people would apply, and if they offered more salary then more people would apply.

    That's not really relevant to the discussion though, I don't think that increased tuition fees would lead more people in to finance, nor do I see why this is a "waste" of their intellect? I think the average IBD worker will have a lot more impact than the average science grad does in their job (most of which are in non-graduate jobs, remember, and even those that are do relatively boring work, in my opinion).



    Here is a simple justification for a fee rise: the government is short of money. I get good value for money at StAs, I get lots of "face time", excellent resources, access to top lecturers and researchers. This varies by university and by subject (eg most honours historians here have ~4 lectures per week, I have ~16, plus labs).


    (Original post by concubine)
    I want to bash the face of everyone that says 'mickey mouse degree' in with a fire extinguisher.
    Why? We all know what it means, and they are relevant to the discussion here.

    (Original post by plopplop)
    With this increase in tuituon fees for English students, will Scottish students still get free university education paid for by English taxpayers? If so I might have to skip univesity and become a pyscopath.
    Probably . They do want independence though, honestly! (they don't, the Scots are laughing all the way to the bank)
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    In this case, applying to America might not be a half-bad idea afterall.
 
 
 
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