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    In college for my Alevel i used to take notes in class but then would have a separate notebook at home where I would take notes from official textbook. Because there is so much to cover at med school i was wonderinf if anyone could give me advise on the best way to note-take and also how to prepare yourself for january exams? Thanks
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    (Original post by panjabiflower)
    In college for my Alevel i used to take notes in class but then would have a separate notebook at home where I would take notes from official textbook. Because there is so much to cover at med school i was wonderinf if anone could give me advise on the best way to note-take and also what the best way to prepare yourself for january exams? Thanks
    Annotate the handouts given in lectures with key points but try to focus your energy on what is being said.

    Its concepts that you need to learn in medicine - not raw facts.
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    Annotate you handouts as much as possible because even if you think it's obvious and you will remember what the lecturer said - a few months later, when exams come along, you wont remember what was said in the lecture at all.

    I don't know if you will have enough time to take notes from textbooks - there's an awful lot of reading. I prefer just to read the books (but some people do make extensive notes from their books). It just depends how you learn.
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    Look up the Cornell method, or alternatively spider diagrams. Also lots of colours and pictures. It helps in your understanding as you are having to process it to draw it versus just copying things down verbatim.

    For exams, the best thing I find is to practise the method (EMI/essays/short answers) etc. as well as things like quizes. Sometimes at the end of the chapter of a textbook, they'll be a section with questions on that you can use.
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    (Original post by Lantana)
    Look up the Cornell method, or alternatively spider diagrams. Also lots of colours and pictures. It helps in your understanding as you are having to process it to draw it versus just copying things down verbatim.

    For exams, the best thing I find is to practise the method (EMI/essays/short answers) etc. as well as things like quizes. Sometimes at the end of the chapter of a textbook, they'll be a section with questions on that you can use.
    Have you had exams already after 1 month 1 day?
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    (Original post by King Newt)
    Have you had exams already after 1 month 1 day?
    I've done a degree before :p: So unfortunatly I've had to do exams before now, albeit it not at my current university -yet!
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    Oh! That's ok then!! Would have been a pretty harsh med school to have done exams already!
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    print off the lectures and just annotate any extra note-worthy information under the appropriate slide. quite a lot of people here spend the entire lecture simply copying the slides on the screen....it's just like wtf are you doing

    if you're ultra keen you can invest in a decent voice recorder and have all your lectures backed up (i don't do this...). so when it comes to revision you can play back everything the lecturer said in case you missed anything in your notes.
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    Read or listen > understand > use spider diagrams to consolidate.

    After the first week at med school I never made notes again. As was said above, you must learn and understand the concepts and you can't do this by just writing down a lecture or copying out of a book!
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    With a pen and paper?
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    Print off lecture handouts beforehand (some lecturers are nice and print these off for you for the lecture). Pay attention in lectures. Annotate lecture slides. Revise from these (whichever way suits your revision style). You'll prob miss some info mentioned in the lecture but the main points will be on the slide anyway.

    You can be a little keen by going to the library afterwards and adding in extra info from relevant books, but tbh the stuff you need to know/probably will be assessed on will be on the handout anyway.

    Waste of time bringing in a laptop IMO. Recording lectures/watching lecture recordings on Blackboard can be useful if it was a particularly complicated one, but for standard lectures, you're probably overcomplicating things going home and listening to them all over again.
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    my method is failing.. going to try these!
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    One thing I'd definitely recommend is to read up on your lectures beforehand, they'll be worth so much more to you and you'll find yourself learning more rather than just copying and/or snoozing in the corner. Wish I did it more, it'd have made end of year exams less stressful... maybe...
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    I now bring my laptop because sometimes I find that the lecturer speaks too fast and I end up missing out important points that he or she says. I found that it has helped a lot and saved me a lot of time as last year I took a notebook in or just annotated my slides. Prior to exam I re-typed all my notes because my writing is too messy, so by typing them up now - i save a lot of pain and time re-typing my lectures before exam. I find that I don't need to dedicate much brain power to typing as I type quite fast and well so I can spend more energy on focussing on what the lecturer is talking about than busy scribbling down notes and possibly missing out more important points. I never took notes from the textbook but I had friends who pretty much re-wrote the textbook. It depends how you study. I can study from the textbook just by simply reading it through and do not require to write any points down. And btw there's quite a lot of reading to get through as well and I know people were struggling re-writing a bunch of textbooks. So if you are the type who re-write textbooks/like taking notes from it - start your reading now (which you should be doing either way), but most people like to leave it right before exams. I learned the hard way (cramming all recommended reading into 5 weeks + studying lecture notes) :eek: - never again - toughest/most stressful 5 weeks ever.
 
 
 
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