Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys, not sure this is correct forum but here it goes.

    I'm thinking of going to uni (september 2011). Which at that time i'll probably be 22 (DOB 4/09/89)! i've just turned 21 and after having 2 years work experience and spending this summer working in America, i've decided Uni life is on the horizon.

    First question is, am i classified as a 'mature' student?

    Secondly, im hoping to study law. But with CDDD (english, economics, geography and general studies, in that order) i fear i don't have enough UCAS points? I believe i have 260 but not quite sure if i add AS to my A2 results.

    I also remember when leaving school that you needed a buzz word to sign up to UCAS. Obviously i'm not in school no more so how do i go about this?

    My other only concern is choosing what university. I cant find a search engine that will let me search by my grades.

    Sorry for all the questions guys but hope someone can help! I'm tottally clueless when it comes to all this stuff. If I only had a complete guide from start to finish.

    Thanks in advance,

    Kev
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    hello, I have some experience of this as i originally applied for law last year. You will struggle to find places at the best universities, so it might not be worth applying there, but with your grades and considerable work experience you could apply to decent unis like Nottingham Trent, especially if you would consider doing a joint law degree e.g law and criminology etc.

    Oh and technically anyone starting above 21 is classified as mature, but this doesn't make any difference to finance or anything else really until your over 25.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah, if you're over 21 you're classified as a 'mature student'.

    CDDD = 260 points but I think you'll need to check if the uni accepts General Studies as an A-level which may mean you only have 200 points. Whether or not you have the correct entry requirements will depend on the uni, so I'd e-mail them/check with the website.

    I'm not aware of any search engines which allow you to search by grades but you can find out entry requirements on the uni's website or using UCAS Course Search: http://www.ucas.ac.uk/students/cours.../2011searcheu/

    When you apply through UCAS you'll apply independently so you shouldn't need a buzzword.

    Hope this helps.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, you would be classed as a mature student. I'm applying for September 2011, I will be 23. Would you be willing to put off university for another year and do an Access to Law Course? In all honesty, with your grades, you may struggle to get a place at a decent uni.

    You can apply as an individual on UCAS, although you will have to contact your school for a reference.

    Hope this helps.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    Firstly, yes you would be classed as a mature student as you are starting uni when you will be 21/become 22

    For the UCAS search, I would suggest to avoid looking at unis for law in the top 20 (you can use ranking tables) and then you will find some out there. This is probably the hardest and longest bit but once it's done it's done :yep: (Yh your grades equal 260 UCAS points)

    You wouldn't need a buzz word, as you be applying as an individual. However, you could email your recent employer to give you a recent reference.

    If anything, email admission tutors of unis that you are interested in and then they could help you.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I suggest an access course or retake your A-levels. Law is not like medicine whereas employers aren't meant to discriminate between universities. If you're degree is not from a good law uni you will struggle to actually get work on a decent law firm relative to other graduates. Not saying it can't be done but it will be harder from a lower ranked course.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    If you can't get straight onto a course, you might want to consider a foundation course - which only requires moderate GCSEs grades. If you pass the foundation year, the university you did the foundation year with, will let you go onto a full course.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I don't know if this will apply to you as well, but I'm reapplying for 2011 entry after leaving my university and I'll be 21 when I start. I contacted my old sixth form and one of my old teachers agreed that I could apply through the school and he would provide me with a reference. Maybe you could consider doing this?

    I am unsure whether technically I am a mature student?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for all your help so far guys!

    Foundation course? Seems i have alot to learn. I know my grades arnt the best. At the time its safe to say studying wasn't my main priority hence giving uni a miss.

    Originally i wanted to do dentistry, would this be possible via a foundation course? I always thought you needed a science a-level, or even decent a-levels to go to university.

    Just so you all know, my 2 years work experience was within the construction industry as a project manager. So i cant see that helping much.

    My understanding was you chose 3 unis to goto, i just dont want to choose 3 and get rejected by them all.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    search using this site:

    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/

    just enter the course (eg: law, dentistry etc) and leave the uni textbox blank. you can order the results by average entrant ucas points.
    Offline

    1
    There will be loads of people in there 20's do there will be a lot of "mature" students
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kev_A_63)
    Originally i wanted to do dentistry, would this be possible via a foundation course? I always thought you needed a science a-level, or even decent a-levels to go to university.
    You'll need to see if there are any Dentistry foundation courses out there.
    Maybe you'll find these link useful:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki..._at_University
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Dentistry
    I would think you'd need science A-levels for Dentistry, it's quite competitive; as is Law which means they're more likely to require higher grades than most courses.

    My understanding was you chose 3 unis to goto, i just dont want to choose 3 and get rejected by them all.
    Most people can choose up to five universities for their course but for if you're applying for Medicine/Dentistry/Veterinary Medicine then the maximum is four for that individual course. Since you've already done your A-levels and aren't studying for any new qualifications, you'll either receive an "Unconditional" (you've been offered a place) or "Unsuccessful" (you've been rejected). Once you've received all your responses from the unis, you'll pick a 'Firm' choice which means you've accepted the offer to study at that uni.

    2011 is a competitive year to be applying to university unfortunately.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kev_A_63)
    Originally i wanted to do dentistry, would this be possible via a foundation course? I always thought you needed a science a-level, or even decent a-levels to go to university.

    My understanding was you chose 3 unis to goto, i just dont want to choose 3 and get rejected by them all.
    There are dentistry courses with foundations years, but they're aimed at people with good, non-scientific grades. I think your best option might be doing an appropriate Access to HE course, and then applying for dentistry with that.

    You pick up to five (or four dentistry, plus one non-dentistry.)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You've all been great help!

    I think i need to check all the links you guys have posted and take all your info and decide what course i actually want to do before advancing. Especially now it looks like im going to have to do an access/foundation course
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kev_A_63)
    You've all been great help!

    I think i need to check all the links you guys have posted and take all your info and decide what course i actually want to do before advancing. Especially now it looks like im going to have to do an access/foundation course
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Law_Degree

    Scroll halfway down, there's a list of unis and entry requirements. I think it's a bit outdated but it should give you a general idea :yy:
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kev_A_63)
    Hi guys, not sure this is correct forum but here it goes.

    I'm thinking of going to uni (september 2011). Which at that time i'll probably be 22 (DOB 4/09/89)! i've just turned 21 and after having 2 years work experience and spending this summer working in America, i've decided Uni life is on the horizon.

    First question is, am i classified as a 'mature' student?

    Secondly, im hoping to study law. But with CDDD (english, economics, geography and general studies, in that order) i fear i don't have enough UCAS points? I believe i have 260 but not quite sure if i add AS to my A2 results.

    I also remember when leaving school that you needed a buzz word to sign up to UCAS. Obviously i'm not in school no more so how do i go about this?

    My other only concern is choosing what university. I cant find a search engine that will let me search by my grades.

    Sorry for all the questions guys but hope someone can help! I'm tottally clueless when it comes to all this stuff. If I only had a complete guide from start to finish.

    Thanks in advance,

    Kev
    Check out the TSR Wiki - there are loads of articles in there about applying for university.

    You are classed as a 'mature' student but this does not really make any difference to entry requirements; at 21 you will be expected to offer much the same in terms of qualifications as anyone applying for entry at 18.

    In terms of your UCAS points, CDDD at A level gives you 260, as you say, and you can add in any points from an AS level you didn't carry on to A level. However, unis will specify, in a tariff (points) offer how many should come from A levels, and also whether General Studies is accepted.

    You can apply as an independent student so wouldn't need a buzz word, but you will need to find a referee who can comment on your academic ability.

    As your grades may be a bit low for the unis you might want to apply to (law is very competitive), you could consider whether to improve your position by further study of some kind - perhaps an OU module or something of that sort.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pugnacitas)
    search using this site:

    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/

    just enter the course (eg: law, dentistry etc) and leave the uni textbox blank. you can order the results by average entrant ucas points.
    That's a great site and exactly what I was after! However it seems some of the ucas entry points are wrong.

    Makes me wonder, if a university has an entry requirement of 280, could I apply with 260. Or is the law 280?

    Thanks again guys.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kev_A_63)
    That's a great site and exactly what I was after! However it seems some of the ucas entry points are wrong.

    Makes me wonder, if a university has an entry requirement of 280, could I apply with 260. Or is the law 280?

    Thanks again guys.
    No, they're not 'wrong' - the unistats site is not reporting standard offers or entry requirements. What it reports is the average actual UCAS score of the people who actually enrolled for a given course.

    For example, the standard entry requirement for history at Warwick is AABc - 380 points in total. However, the unistats figures show that the average UCAS score of those who enrolled was 460. For Edinburgh the comparable figures are 300/320 and 420+ respectively.

    So what the unistats lists provide you with is a sense of the gap between the stated typical offer and the actual grades achieved. Remember that many students have done general studies, but this may be excluded from the offers made. Also remember than an average is just that - so there will be plenty of people who got in with less than the average. In which case, if you meet the requirements of the typical offer, you are in with a chance.

    What I'd suggest you do is use the unistats site as a guide to identify the unis you should investigate further - but remember that the gap between the average actual grades and the basic entry requirements can be large.

    And, you can apply wherever you like - it's just that you won't be successful if you don't meet the requirements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for the info! You've all helped me immensely. Now I know where to start
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys - Stumbled upon another problem now, lol.

    I'm lookin at a courses in primary education now. After working in American with Children of the similar age i feel it's a suitable course that i'll be interestd in.

    However, i'm currently looking at 'Primary Education with QTS (X120)' which some unis are offering on the modular basis, or non-modular basis. And some seem to be 3 or 4 years.

    Why are some universities offering the same course code for 4 years whilst some are saying its a 3 year course? Same goes for modular and non-modular; what's best and what exactly does it mean?

    I've currently narrowed down 2 universities, bangor and bishop grosseteste, but am looking at more options.

    thanks again,
 
 
 

University open days

  1. University of Cambridge
    Christ's College Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Sep '18
  2. Norwich University of the Arts
    Undergraduate Open Days Undergraduate
    Fri, 28 Sep '18
  3. Edge Hill University
    Faculty of Health and Social Care Undergraduate
    Sat, 29 Sep '18
Poll
Which accompaniment is best?
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.