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    Basically I've got bad bad GCSE grades. Do I explain why I got them in my personal statement or should I email the admission people and explain?

    Not sure, what to do?
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    Get your teacher to put it in your reference and possibly email too - but definitely not in the PS!
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    I think this is supposed to be explained by your referee.
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    depends, how bad are we talking, and what are you planning to apply for?
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    (Original post by JamesLanek)
    Basically I've got bad bad GCSE grades. Do I explain why I got them in my personal statement or should I email the admission people and explain?

    Not sure, what to do?
    Your PS should be positive. It is generally better for this sort of information to come from your referee. Further information should be provided by email to the uni only if they ask for it, or if it is such a complicated story that your reference can't cover it.
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    (Original post by booooom)
    depends, how bad are we talking, and what are you planning to apply for?
    Let me put it this way, it's Bad as in it was below Cs. I'm hoping to study History.


    (Original post by Minerva)
    Your PS should be positive. It is generally better for this sort of information to come from your referee. Further information should be provided by email to the uni only if they ask for it, or if it is such a complicated story that your reference can't cover it.
    The thing is my referee doesn't know me that well.

    I'm tempted to just write a normal positive PS, allow the referee to write up a usual standard reference and privately email the universities I'm applying too and explain why my GCSE grades were bad.

    Would that be a good idea? Or do universities hate students emailing them?
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    (Original post by JamesLanek)
    Let me put it this way, it's Bad as in it was below Cs. I'm hoping to study History.




    The thing is my referee doesn't know me that well.

    I'm tempted to just write a normal positive PS, allow the referee to write up a usual standard reference and privately email the universities I'm applying too and explain why my GCSE grades were bad.

    Would that be a good idea? Or do universities hate students emailing them?
    Anyone could email a university and say 'my GCSE results were bad because....'. The problem is that without confirmation from an independent source, no uni is going to take that too seriously. And, of course, it needs to be a legitimate reason - eg illness, difficult family circumstances. If it's just that you dossed around until it was too late, the only way you can deal with that is by emphasising the progress you made at AS.

    Incidentally, if you got Ds or less in English Language and/or Maths you should bear in mind that many universities (and employers) require Grade Cs in both as a minimum. Therefore, you would be well advised to organise early resits if you need to do so.

    If you don't think your referee knows you well enough to back up what you might want to say, your best bet is to contact the universities direct and ask them what sort of evidence they would want to see.
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    (Original post by Minerva)
    Anyone could email a university and say 'my GCSE results were bad because....'. The problem is that without confirmation from an independent source, no uni is going to take that too seriously. And, of course, it needs to be a legitimate reason - eg illness, difficult family circumstances. If it's just that you dossed around until it was too late, the only way you can deal with that is by emphasising the progress you made at AS.

    Incidentally, if you got Ds or less in English Language and/or Maths you should bear in mind that many universities (and employers) require Grade Cs in both as a minimum. Therefore, you would be well advised to organise early resits if you need to do so.

    If you don't think your referee knows you well enough to back up what you might want to say, your best bet is to contact the universities direct and ask them what sort of evidence they would want to see.
    Well I'm now 21 and a few years ago I retook my English and Maths GCSE and got B in both. They were the only ones I was allowed to retake.

    My GCSE grades were so poor that I was not allowed to do any of the GCSE retake programs. Which in turn meant that I wasn't allowed to do my A levels. I'm currently doing Intensive A levels simply because the entry requirement was more lenient. I wanted to do the normal A level course, but was not allowed to.

    I did poorly in my GCSEs because I gave up. I wasn't interested in going to school any more. No coursework was ever submitted and I didn't want to do the exams, but the teachers made me, even though I never revised once. I mean, it wasn't like I just missed on getting Cs and just got Ds or something. I got those bad bad grades for simply turning up and writing something down.

    The thing is, the unis might wonder why on earth did I get those poor grades. Was I not academically capable? The answer is no, I just gave up. I didn't try. Or they might wonder, why didn't he retake his GCSE? Again, like I said earlier, I simply was not allowed.

    I mean, I could prove to the unis that I wasn't allowed to retake my GCSEs properly by showing them the entry requirement of the colleges for their GCSE retake programmes.

    So, should I still email them and give my reasons, once my UCAS application is sent off?
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    (Original post by JamesLanek)
    Well I'm now 21 and a few years ago I retook my English and Maths GCSE and got B in both. They were the only ones I was allowed to retake.

    My GCSE grades were so poor that I was not allowed to do any of the GCSE retake programs. Which in turn meant that I wasn't allowed to do my A levels. I'm currently doing Intensive A levels simply because the entry requirement was more lenient. I wanted to do the normal A level course, but was not allowed to.

    I did poorly in my GCSEs because I gave up. I wasn't interested in going to school any more. No coursework was ever submitted and I didn't want to do the exams, but the teachers made me, even though I never revised once. I mean, it wasn't like I just missed on getting Cs and just got Ds or something. I got those bad bad grades for simply turning up and writing something down.

    The thing is, the unis might wonder why on earth did I get those poor grades. Was I not academically capable? The answer is no, I just gave up. I didn't try. Or they might wonder, why didn't he retake his GCSE? Again, like I said earlier, I simply was not allowed.

    I mean, I could prove to the unis that I wasn't allowed to retake my GCSEs properly by showing them the entry requirement of the colleges for their GCSE retake programmes.

    So, should I still email them and give my reasons, once my UCAS application is sent off?
    OK, in those circumstances I would just put in the GCSEs you did get, and then have a one-liner in your PS about lacking motivation at that time. If you are doing well with the intensive A level course then you have real evidence that you have learned from this and moved on to a more positive place.
 
 
 
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