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'Furness 'super-school' excludes 380 pupils' in its first year. Watch

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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Yes it is. Rules are there for a reason. Break them and prepare for consequences. Children who do not follow these rules are not learning the life lessons of respect and abiding by rules.
    But should we be teaching children blind obedience?
    Look up Milgram's obedience study as an example of how dangerous obedience is.
    I think kids should be taught to obey rules when necessary, but also to be able to decide whether the rule really is there for a reason. I hate the idea of petty rules which make no difference to education, as long as a child isn't behaving dangerously or disruptively, why should they be punished?
    Why are we punishing kids for the colour of their school bag and why aren't we encouraging them to learn?
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    (Original post by Circadian_Rhythm)
    Yay lots of Cumbrians around today
    We come out of the woodwork occasionally :p:.
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    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    I'm not advocating rule breaking. It's the mode of punishment that is ridiculous. In an attempt to create strict discipline they have lost sight of what school is actually for: learning.
    Yes they are learning rules are there for a reason.
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    (Original post by vixen23)
    But should we be teaching children blind obedience?
    Look up Milgram's obedience study as an example of how dangerous obedience is.
    I think kids should be taught to obey rules when necessary, but also to be able to decide whether the rule really is there for a reason. I hate the idea of petty rules which make no difference to education, as long as a child isn't behaving dangerously or disruptively, why should they be punished?
    Why are we punishing kids for the colour of their school bag and why aren't we encouraging them to learn?
    Because it's a slippery road. Eventually they are all over the place when they break the small rules. Society will collapse.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Yes they are learning rules are there for a reason.
    Ah, but that's the crucial point. What reason is there behind dictating the colour of a back pack other than to make all the pupils look the same?
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Yes they are learning rules are there for a reason.
    And the reason for percentage of black on their shoes is...
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    this is brilliant op

    my kids are going to that school. its not hard to buy a black bag. they will learn how to when exculded

    34% means its a very bad school in a horrible area
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    (Original post by M_E_X)
    And has the school improved since then? Do you think this school can improve?
    Oh definitely. The year after mine (this year) got 40% and I feel it will continue to improve. At it's lowest the pass rate was at 20% and our school was in special measures until my final year when it got taken over by a charity called Ark and made into an academy. They literally had more money then sense and ploughed it into us by getting new teachers, new buildings - the whole shebang. I feel envious of the current year 7's because they are gonna have an amazing education. They're realy piling on the pressure to all years to set good habits in them early so they do well 5 years down the line on their GCSE's. I think the school just can't wait till the current year 9's (the last batch from the old shool) leave . Then it's like a clean slate and you have students who have been with the school since year seven and they are hopefully going to do amazingly.

    I heard the academy is going to become selective now too. In fact this charity has now taken over nearly all local schools so the entire area hopefully will flourish.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Because it's a slippery road. Eventually they are all over the place when they break the small rules. Society will collapse.
    I believe 'slippery slope' is an argumental fallacy.

    Also, well educated kids with multicoloured backpacks aren't half as likely to collapse society as unqualified clones.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Because it's a slippery road. Eventually they are all over the place when they break the small rules. Society will collapse.
    Stop speaking ********.

    Schools are meant to be for learning. How about the kids learn that clothing doesnt change a person? That head teacher will be the type of bloke that spends two months of wages on a suit hoping that it will make him better at his job.
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    (Original post by LazyWorseThanInfidel)
    this is brilliant op

    my kids are going to that school. its not hard to buy a black bag. they will learn how to when exculded
    If the school was doing well then I don't think people would criticise the rules quite so much, but the fact that they are spending time dictating the colour of bags instead of actually teaching seems slightly strange. I'd welcome a parent's perspective though . The Evening Mail isn't always the most reliable and most of the parents commenting on the website are there because they have a problem with the school.
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    (Original post by vixen23)
    And the reason for percentage of black on their shoes is...
    Can't be going school with your latest blue/red/yellow creps can you :dontknow:
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Because it's a slippery road. Eventually they are all over the place when they break the small rules. Society will collapse.
    Society would collapse if we didn't break the small rules from time to time.
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    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    If the school was doing well then I don't think people would criticise the rules quite so much, but the fact that they are spending time dictating the colour of bags instead of actually teaching seems slightly strange. I'd welcome a parent's perspective though . The Evening Mail isn't always the most reliable and most of the parents commenting on the website are there because they have a problem with the school.
    teaching children who do not want to be taught is foolish and this is what this school is doing

    because they have to

    oh so maybe they should just go on teaching like they have done for the past 30 years and get 34%?

    or they could discipline

    why dont you go on work experience in a crap school and watch the teachers struggle because the kids are allowed to act however they want
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    (Original post by LazyWorseThanInfidel)
    teaching children who do not want to be taught is foolish and this is what this school is doing

    because they have to

    oh so maybe they should just go on teaching like they have done for the past 30 years and get 34%?

    or they could discipline

    why dont you go on work experience in a crap school and watch the teachers struggle because the kids are allowed to act however they want
    I don't need to go on work experience in one, I went to a school that is considered 'crap' (although I disagree) and the teachers certainly didn't win the attention of the children by telling them they couldn't choose what back pack to wear. The good teachers got the attention of the pupils through authority, but also by actually respecting the children. But the change in regime has made results worse, not better. Granted, the improvement might not be apparent straight away. Just because a minority of the children think that they can misbehave, it doesn't mean every child should be subjected to pointless rules. How is wearing a black back pack going to make an uninspired kid more interested? Good teaching and an environment that has limits without suffocating the kids has to be a better alternative, surely?
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    (Original post by vixen23)
    But should we be teaching children blind obedience?
    Look up Milgram's obedience study as an example of how dangerous obedience is.
    I think kids should be taught to obey rules when necessary, but also to be able to decide whether the rule really is there for a reason. I hate the idea of petty rules which make no difference to education, as long as a child isn't behaving dangerously or disruptively, why should they be punished?
    Why are we punishing kids for the colour of their school bag and why aren't we encouraging them to learn?
    This exactly.....
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    34% makes it one of the worst in the country doesnt it?
    nope. there are a lot of schools that get less then 34%.
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    (Original post by vixen23)
    But should we be teaching children blind obedience?
    Look up Milgram's obedience study as an example of how dangerous obedience is.
    I think kids should be taught to obey rules when necessary, but also to be able to decide whether the rule really is there for a reason. I hate the idea of petty rules which make no difference to education, as long as a child isn't behaving dangerously or disruptively, why should they be punished?
    Why are we punishing kids for the colour of their school bag and why aren't we encouraging them to learn?
    Permit children to decide whether a rule is there for a reason? I'm sorry but that is just absured! What happens when they decide that the legal drinking age is there for no reason? Or the drink drive laws? Not to mention any number of other laws that already seem to be ignored with impunity!

    Young people need to learn that the rules DO serve a purpose, they ensure that everyone in the school knows the expected standard - backing this up with a sanction reinforces the point. Seemingly trivial rules are there to set the standards and the tone of the school; when these standards are enforced consistently, everyone knows what is expected of them. Where consistent responses are not in place, you only need one person to get away with breaking a rule and others will follow suit - it send the message that respecting the authority of the teacher and the rules they lay down is optional.

    Where is lack of respect with regard to 'trivial' matters, a lack of respect on more serious matters tends to follow.
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    (Original post by Fat-Love)
    Oh definitely. The year after mine (this year) got 40% and I feel it will continue to improve. At it's lowest the pass rate was at 20% and our school was in special measures until my final year when it got taken over by a charity called Ark and made into an academy. They literally had more money then sense and ploughed it into us by getting new teachers, new buildings - the whole shebang. I feel envious of the current year 7's because they are gonna have an amazing education. They're realy piling on the pressure to all years to set good habits in them early so they do well 5 years down the line on their GCSE's. I think the school just can't wait till the current year 9's (the last batch from the old shool) leave . Then it's like a clean slate and you have students who have been with the school since year seven and they are hopefully going to do amazingly.

    I heard the academy is going to become selective now too. In fact this charity has now taken over nearly all local schools so the entire area hopefully will flourish.
    Hmm, that kind of ruins the test - if the school is selective we can't really get a fair gauge of how effective this sort of schooling is. Fact is though, in the first year it did absolutely disastrously.

    I suspect that student intake at the school will fall sharply: poor results combined with overbearing rules, I would not go there nor send my children there.
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    (Original post by Emmie3303)
    I don't need to go on work experience in one, I went to a school that is considered 'crap' (although I disagree) and the teachers certainly didn't win the attention of the children by telling them they couldn't choose what back pack to wear. The good teachers got the attention of the pupils through authority, but also by actually respecting the children. But the change in regime has made results worse, not better. Granted, the improvement might not be apparent straight away. Just because a minority of the children think that they can misbehave, it doesn't mean every child should be subjected to pointless rules. How is wearing a black back pack going to make an uninspired kid more interested? Good teaching and an environment that has limits without suffocating the kids has to be a better alternative, surely?
    did you know that schools in britain used to be good in the early 20th century and mid 20th? now they are a fricking mess. thanks to this nicey nicey crap. first they stopped the cain. now schools even have no shouting policies thanks to this junk research into how to educate kids best. its not even the schools fault, its the unemployed parents who do not bring up their kids with discipline. private schools are good because the kids are brought up well.
 
 
 
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